» » Am I Not A Man? The Dred Scott Story

Download Am I Not A Man? The Dred Scott Story fb2

by Mark L. Shurtleff
Download Am I Not A Man? The Dred Scott Story fb2
Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Mark L. Shurtleff
  • ISBN:
    1935546007
  • ISBN13:
    978-1935546009
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Valor Publishing; 1st edition (November 3, 2009)
  • Pages:
    534 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1431 kb
  • ePUB format
    1621 kb
  • DJVU format
    1597 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    660
  • Formats:
    azw mobi txt lrf


Am I Not a Man? book. His courageous life story is worthy of praise and recognition. Author Mark L. Shurtleff spotlights Dred Scott in this engaging historical novel based on fact, Am I Not a Man?

Am I Not a Man? book. Shurtleff spotlights Dred Scott in this engaging historical novel based on fact, Am I Not a Man? The Dred Scott Story. With a powerful storyline and compelling characters, this story of adventure, courage, love, hatred, and friendship parallels the history of the American nation-from the long night of slavery to the narrow crack of dawn that would ultimately lead to the freedom and equality of all men.

AG Shurtleff opens our eyes to a man who risked it all. A book not to be missed. The storyline is educational and tender, and the topics of the Constitutional guarantees of liberty are again passion-points in America.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 503-507)

Includes bibliographical references (pages 503-507). Dred Scott's inspiring and compelling true story of adventure, courage, love, hatred, and friendship parallels the history of this nation from the long night of slavery to the narrow crack in the door that would ultimately lead to freedom and equality for all men.

Shurtleff, a white author, never lets us forget these black men and women were human beings. He shows the reader that Dred and his wife, Harriet, were loving, caring people

Dred Scott's inspiring and compelling true story of adventure, courage, love, hatred, and friendship parallels the history of this nation from the long night of slavery to the narrow crack in the door that would ultimately lead to freedom and equality for all men"-Cover, p. 2.

2 people like this topic. It's free and anyone can join.

Mark Shurtleff’s new novel, Am I Not A Man? The Dred Scott Story, tell the story of a landmark case in constitutional support for slavery. Dred Scott, his wife and two daughters (one of whom was born in free territory) were taken to a free territory by their master. The legal precedent at the time was once free, always free -if a master took a slave to a free state/territory, they were considered freed, and if they returned to a slave state, they must be released.

Falling to his knees, Dred cried, Ain t I a man? Dred answered his own question by rising and taking his fight to the . From the Inside Flap: An illiterate slave, Dred Scott, trustedin an all-white, slave-owning jury to declare him free.

I am a man. God made us both. Am I Not a Man? by Mark L. Shurtleff. I Am a Man!" has been used as a title for books, plays, and in music and film to assert the rights of all people to be treated with dignity "I Am a Man!" was a foundational reference in Derek DelGaudio's theater show "In & Of Itself. DelGaudio created 1,000 "I AM" cards, each with a different descriptor.

Последние твиты от Mark L. Shurtleff (Shurtleff). Founder Shurtleff Law Firm (UT CA). Former 3 term Utah Attorney General. Author of Dred Scott novel otAMan?. On the night of 10/6/19 Mindy Worley & I were outside the haunted LaLaurie Mansion in New Orleans. Mindy took pics of the 2nd floor. Later we noticed that drapes in 2 windows were parted.

An illiterate slave, Dred Scott trusted in an all-white, slave-owning jury to declare him free. But after briefly experiencing the glory of freedom and manhood, a new state Supreme Court ordered the cold steel of the shackles to be closed again around his wrists and ankles. Falling to his knees, Dred cried, "Ain't I a man?" Dred answered his own question by rising and taking his fight to the U.S. Supreme Court. Dred ultimately lost his epic battle when the Chief Justice declared that a black man was so inferior that he had "no rights a white man was bound to respect."Dred died not knowing that his undying courage led directly to the election of President Abraham Lincoln and the emancipation proclamation.Dred Scott's inspiring and compelling true story of adventure, courage, love, hatred, and friendship parallels the history of this nation from the long night of slavery to the narrow crack in the door that would ultimately lead to freedom and equality for all men.

Xig
This book is very inspirational. It shows the true determination of a hard working human-being fighting to be free and respected as an equual man. For a fair opportunity for himself and family.
No man woman nor child should have to live life unjustly. "Am I Not A Man?'---The Dred Scott Story is powerful. I had been led to this book by an associate who could not put it down when he read it and would not lend it out to be read----so I purchased my own and feel the same as he. It's a keeper. Thank you for the excellent newness and delivery of my book.
Faulkree
Good history book.
Worla
A pivotal time and place in the history of the US. AG Shurtleff opens our eyes to a man who risked it all.
A book not to be missed. Buy one for yourself and one for a friend for summer reading!
Daron
Book had problems in the printing process. Some chapters were duplicated while other chapters were left out. Vendor did offer to refund the cost of book and shipping. The author of the book actually sent me an autographed copy. Great Book that everyone of all ages should read.
LoboThommy
No
Arcanefire
"AM I NOT A MAN?" the first novel by Utah's Attorney General, Mark L. Shurtleff, is generating a substantial amount of buzz, and for good reason. The author's research about Dred Scott's life, and the era in which he lived, is phenomenal, particularly as it's observed through the prism of his battle to escape slavery using the American judicial system. The storyline is educational and tender, and the topics of the Constitutional guarantees of liberty are again passion-points in America. For these reasons and many others, "AM I NOT A MAN" is an important book that should be on our shopping lists this year.

Most school children have had some introduction to the man for whom the infamous Supreme Court ruling, "The Dred Scott Decision," is named, but Mark L. Shurtleff's exhaustive research transforms a vague history lesson into a powerful example of hope, courage, and dignity under fire, reminding us why that landmark Supreme Court case was required text. The highest court's ruling, "that a black man was so inferior that he had no rights a white man was bound to respect," chills us today, highlighting the dangerous consequences that occur when men bend the Constitution to achieve an agenda.

Dred Scott was born a slave named Sam Blow, but his life was a montage of extraordinary experiences, propelled by a mind and heart that could never be enslaved. He was connected to the most important events and people of his day, and his battle to hold the legal system's "feet" to the Constitutional "fire" drew the entire nation's attention. Underlying the precedent-setting legal chronicle is the simple, tender story of a man seeking what every person seeks--love, a family, self-determination. For years, Dred fought to prevent his family from being split apart, and to spare his young daughters from the brutality and debasing abuse subjected upon most female slaves. With the help of his white benefactors, and after years of suffering, Dred won his fight and achieved his dream of freedom, but his victory was short-lived when his case was overturned on appeal. Following more years of delay and further appeals, Dred's case was heard before the United States Supreme Court, where the justices' decision was not made to uphold the law as much as it was intended to calm the gathering storm. It failed on all counts, stripping away the Scotts' freedom, denying all Negroes the standing afforded to other Americans, providing the platform upon which Abraham Lincoln rose and escalating the call to war.It is a painful saga.

Truly, "AM I NOT A MAN?" is more than a biography. It is a sweeping panorama of American history, and Dred is in the thick of it. I regret that no historical notes were included in this book. I would have loved to follow Mr. Shurtleff's leads for further study, and to draw the line where the history ends and the fictionalized portions exist.

For example, a painful exchange occurs between fellow slave owners, Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, over the immoral compromise they had each accepted in order to secure passage of the documents needed to establish and maintain the United States--the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution. The great irony is that these "definers of American liberty," are discussing their regret over the institution of slavery as they arrive at the Blow family plantation the night Dred "Sam Blow" Scott was born a slave. Mr. Shurtleff delivers a fascinating literary moment, but I would have loved knowing where fiction and fact met during that exchange. Another curious connection exists between Dred and his boyhood friend, Nat Turner, the slave whose murderous revolt would spell agony for slaves across the map. Again, historical notes would help separate the extraordinary facts from the fascinating fiction.

Let me note, however, how extraordinarily exhaustive Mr. Shurtleff's research is. During the five years I've conducted the research for my Free Men and Dreamers series, I've covered many of the issues, places and people that fill "AM I NOT A MAN?" Mere weeks ago, I returned to Point Comfort where Dred Scott fought during the War of 1812, and then, as I read Shurtleff's account of that battle, I was impressed with the care and attention to detail the author took with this small chapter in Dred Scott's life. That level of historical integrity permeates the work.

"AM I NOT A MAN?" is not an easy read--literally or emotionally. In his effort to incorporate all the wonderful history he has uncovered, the author frequently becomes a historian instead of a novelist, shifting time periods and interjecting long passages of fascinating background info that slow the read for those who come merely seeking a historical novel. Emotionally, the story is painful and graphic in places, perhaps necessarily so, but parents should be advised before handing the book to a younger reader.

None of these issues trump the value or importance of this book. It is a painful story that chronicles the best and worst in man, compelling the reader to place themselves in the shoes of Dred Scott or his brave benefactors. We leave determined to seek and defend liberty at any cost, and that's what makes "AM I NOT A MAN?" one of the most important books I've read this year, and a novel I highly recommend.

Hardcover: 534 pages
Publisher: Valor Publishing Group; 1st edition (November 3, 2009)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1935546007
ISBN-13: 978-1935546009
Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 1.8 inches
Styphe
Am I Not A Man? The Dred Scott Story by Mark L. Shurtleff

This awesome debut by Mark Shurtleff, Utah's Attorney General, goes deep into telling the story of Dred Scott, the little 5'4" giant of a man. Dred was born Sam Blow on a Virginia Plantation, but when his brother dies, he takes on his name. Dred, even though he is a slave and is treated very badly at times, he treats others with a humbling dignity missing today. Early in his young life, he is asked of his owner, a doctor, to go out in the middle of a river, to stake a squatter's claim and he almost drowns, but has a total change in his life that changes him for good. During his early years, he was friends with Nat Turner, but because of his odd behavior, he didn't stay friends long and Nat ended by taking another path than Dred, as Dred was a very spiritual man, could quote scripture beter than some who could read. When Dred and a former owner were down on a riverbank, he overheard people shouting to Winfield Scott, Commander, "Great Scott." Dred liked the sound of the words and the man, so from then on, he went as Dred Scott.

When the love of his early life, Sarah, gets sold at an auction, it totally devastates him, but later, he does find the woman who loves him the way a wife should and that is Harriet, who was raised on a plantation and treated as one of the family. She and Dred had two girls, Eliza, known as Gypsy Girl and Lizzie. When Dr. Emerson, who Dred worked for, died, his widow took him to court. She had mistreated him terribly, much worse than her husband had. Dred had moved from a slave state to a free state with Dr. Em erson, so if you return to a slave state, you were considered free as the saying went "Once Free, Always Free." When Dred won his ca se in the lower courts, he was happy, but the decision was reversed, so he decided to sue at the highest level The Supreme Court and lost. It was a landmark case, and was the reason Abraham Lincoln was our 16th President, that if not for Dred Scott, Abraham Lincoln would not have been our President.

One of the things I really liked about this moving story was the bantering back and forth between Jefferson and Madison. And, when Dred gets so excited when he learns to "spell" his name in Morse Code. What an experience that must've been for him!!! Since I've had my ARC for awhile and have discussed this book and Dred Scott with friends and family, it has surprised me how many people do not know much about our Country and its history. And, for this, I'm sad. For those who read my review who have never heard of Dred Scott or his case, please do yourself a HUGE favor and read this most important story. I knew about Dred Scott, but learned so much and came away touched to have learned what a great man he was. No man should be abused the way he and hundreds of thousands of blacks were treated. We are all created by God as equal men and women, regardless of color. Mark, hats off to you!!!

Forever Friends Rating A HUGE 5 Stars by Teri
Until Next Time, See You Around The Book Nook.

Valor Publishing Group
Pub. Date: 3 November 2009
ISBN: 978-1-835546-00-9
534pp