Download Earthly Powers fb2

by Anthony Burgess
Download Earthly Powers fb2
Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Anthony Burgess
  • ISBN:
    1609450841
  • ISBN13:
    978-1609450847
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Europa Editions; Reissue edition (December 4, 2012)
  • Pages:
    656 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1785 kb
  • ePUB format
    1248 kb
  • DJVU format
    1576 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    409
  • Formats:
    doc docx lrf lit


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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. which meshes the real and personalised history of the twentieth century' - Martin Amis.

Let us then put on the mask of distinguished immoral author. His archbishship awaits. And he opened the heavy door which led straight into the airy upper salon.

CHAPTER 1. It was the afternoon of my eighty-first birthday, and I was in bed with my catamite when Ali announced that the archbishop had come to see me. "Very good, Ali," I quavered in Spanish through the closed door of the master bedroom. Let us then put on the mask of distinguished immoral author. At my age I could, can, take any fierce amount of light and heat, and both these properties of the South roared in, like a Rossini finale in stereophony, from the open and unshuttered casements.

Earthly Powers is a panoramic saga of the 20th century by Anthony Burgess first published in 1980

Earthly Powers is a panoramic saga of the 20th century by Anthony Burgess first published in 1980. It begins with the "outrageously provocative" first sentence: "It was the afternoon of my eighty-first birthday, and I was in bed with my catamite when Ali announced that the archbishop had come to see m.

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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. An exploration of the very essence of power centers on two men who represent different types of earthly power-one an eminent novelist and well-known homosexual.

She had been led to the marriage bed, no question of it, too early. The warm wet brown eyes of Professor Michael Breslow could not leave her alone, even at the dinner table senior

She had been led to the marriage bed, no question of it, too early. The warm wet brown eyes of Professor Michael Breslow could not leave her alone, even at the dinner table senior. They had met in no context of higher education, unless the term could be applied to the readings by distinguished writers held at the Poetry Centre on Lexington Avenue. Ann had been taken by a girl friend to hear a very drunk American poet of the Black Mountain school slobber unintelligible verses, and, taking coffee after, she had met Professor Breslow.

In all ways, a remarkable book - Paul Theroux A hellfire tract thrown down by a novelist at the peak of his powers The Times Enormous imagination and vitality - a huge book in every way Sunday Times Burgess is the great postmodern storehouse of British writing-an important experimentalist; an encyclopaedic amasser, but also a maker of form; a playful comic, with.

Earthly Powers (1980) was Burgess’s attempt to write a novel that could display his literary artistry, the intention being .

Earthly Powers (1980) was Burgess’s attempt to write a novel that could display his literary artistry, the intention being something he compares to Ford Madox Ford’s desire when he set out to write The Good Soldier (1915). The novel tells the story of Kenneth Toomey, a homosexual author who is reminiscing about his life.

Enormous imagination and vitality - a huge book in every way". A hellfire tract thrown down by a novelist at the peak of his powers".

Kenneth Toomey is an eminent novelist of dubious talent; Don Carlo Campanati is a man of God, a shrewd manipulator who rises through the Vatican to become the architect of church revolution and a candidate for sainthood. Enormous imagination and vitality - a huge book in every way". In all ways, a remarkable book". More from this Author.

In Earthly Powers Burgess created his masterpiece. At its center are two twentieth-century men who represent different kinds of power—Kenneth Toomey, a past-his-prime author of mediocre fiction, a man who has outlived his contemporaries to survive into, bitter, luxurious old age, living in self-exile on Malta; and Don Carlo Campanati, a man of God, eventually of church revolution and a candidate for sainthood beloved Pope, who rises through the Vatican as a shrewd manipulator to become the architect.

Through the lives of these two modern men Burgess explores the very essence of power in a narrative that spans from Hollywood, to Dublin, Nairobi, Paris, and beyond.


Umsida
A great book, a terrible electronic edition. This was not transcribed, it was scanned and not proofread or given any further editing. The word "tuan," for instance (Malay, meaning "gentleman" or "sir" or some such honorific) is sometimes rendered as "tuan," sometimes as "twin." This is just the tip of the iceberg, too -- letters are rendered as numbers, words and phrases are run together without punctuation or spacing, and many lines are totally unreadable. Because Burgess's prose is very much his own, translating these scanning errors into something that makes sense is often impossible. I've read the book several times in its hard-cover print edition and was able to figure some of this out, but not by any means all.
Gaxaisvem
Burgess writes 700 pages that are never dull, In style and plot. It is a challenging mix of lofty religious, moral and artistic concerns combined with at times brutally frank descriptions low life excesses. Its narrator Ken Toomey is a wealthy, if mediocre writer, who because of his homosexuality is at odds with the Catholic church whose traditions he otherwise respects more than the other central character Father Don Carlo Companati who eventually becomes pope. Both are capable of great heroism as well as colossal excess. Their stories intertwine with major events of the 20th century. Earthly Powers length, thematic depth and language make it a demanding read. If you are looking for heroic figures, you won't find them here. If, on the other hand, you like satirical swipes at some modern artistic, religious, sexual and historical golden calves, there is much to enjoy..
Nilarius
First of all, I've loved this book for years and have read it many times. I'm quite familiar with its content.

Therefore, I was glad to see a Kindle version. Until I started to read it.

Obviously, nobody proofreads Kindle books. At one point, the characters ate something called "coq au yin." A black trumpet player in a Paris nightclub is referred to as a "genuine fig." (Imagine my consternation at being distracted by the idea of a giant piece of fruit playing trumpet in a nightclub.)

The piece de resistance in this horrendous editing, however, has to be the part about the Arian heresy, which, according to the Kindle version, was proposed by a cleric known as "Anus." I had always thought the man's name was Arius.
anneli
One of Anthony Burgess's best. How can a book that opens with "...I was in bed with my catamite when Ali announced that the archbishop had come to see me" fail to deliver the goods, and he did -- a complex plot involving the pope, the protag's own convoluted life, and Italy at mid-century. It's worth re-reading just for the writing.
JoJolar
I know, sadly, that we must expect ebooks to be shoddily prepared. I dream of the day when ebooks will be proofread as thoroughly as print books are. That said, I was shocked at the number of errors in this text -- especially considering that this is a very important book from one of the most important British authors of the latter half of the 20th century.
Androwyn
The Kindle version is riddled with errors in translation from print to electronic media. This is especially bad when reading Burgess because he delights in using esoteric language. When using Kindle one can easily look up these obscure words in the dictionary, but not if they are misspelled, Therefore the reader can never tell if the word in question is totally obscure or merely misspelled. Otherwise yet another brilliant book by Burgess.
Opithris
I've always loved his books from the weird to the outlandish, but this is by far his best and most complete work. It shows his mastery of plot and intricate character relationships. I highly recommend it if you're willing to put the time in how large it is.
Dry wit and a convoluted plot.