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by Charlotte Smith,Jacqueline M. Labbe
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Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Charlotte Smith,Jacqueline M. Labbe
  • ISBN:
    1551112132
  • ISBN13:
    978-1551112138
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Broadview Press (September 19, 2002)
  • Pages:
    587 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1863 kb
  • ePUB format
    1704 kb
  • DJVU format
    1156 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    395
  • Formats:
    rtf lrf mbr txt


In The Old Manor House (1794), Charlotte Smith combines elements of the romance, the Gothic . Jacqueline M. Labbe is a Reader in the Department of English and Comparative Literary Studies at the University of Warwick

In The Old Manor House (1794), Charlotte Smith combines elements of the romance, the Gothic, recent history, and culture to produce both a social document and a compelling novel. A property romance, the love story of Orlando and Monimia revolves around the Manor House as inheritable property. Labbe is a Reader in the Department of English and Comparative Literary Studies at the University of Warwick. She is the author of The Romantic Paradox: Love, Violence, and the Uses of Romance, 1760-1830 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2000).

Author:Charlotte Smith. We appreciate the impact a good book can have. - Theresa M. Kelley, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

In The Old Manor House (1794), Charlotte Smith combines elements of the . Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers.

In The Old Manor House (1794), Charlotte Smith combines elements of the romance, the Gothic, recent history, and culture to produce both a social document and a compelling novel. A "property romance," the love story of Orlando and Monimia revolves around the Manor House as inheritable property.

By implication, Smith's novel is revealed as an extension of-rather than a mere reflection of-the contemporaneous debates that are so well represented in the scholarly apparatus.

The Old Manor House book. Orlando needs to keep in favour with Mrs. Rayland, but he can only do this at the expense of his relationship with Monimia; and vice-versa.

IN an old Manor House in one of the most southern counties of England, resided some few years since the last of. .

IN an old Manor House in one of the most southern counties of England, resided some few years since the last of a family that had for a long series of years possessed i. of their lives surrounded them, and Mrs Barbara the eldest, and Mrs Catharine the youngest, died single – one at the age of seventy, and the other at that of sixty-eight: by which events the second, Mrs Grace, saw herself at the advanced age of sixty-nine sole inheritor of the fortunes of her house, without any near relation, or indeed any relation.

Peterborough, Ont. : Broadview Press. Labbe, Jacqueline . 1965-. inlibrary; printdisabled; trent university;. Kahle/Austin Foundation. Sony Alpha-A6300 (Control).

Smith signed herself "Charlotte Smith of Bignor Park" on the title page of Elegiac Sonnets, claiming the role of.

Smith signed herself "Charlotte Smith of Bignor Park" on the title page of Elegiac Sonnets, claiming the role of gentlewoman. Nicholas Turner encountered financial difficulties upon his return to England and he was forced to sell some of the family's holdings and to marry the wealthy Henrietta Meriton in 1765. Although Charlotte Smith later argued against slavery in works such as The Old Manor House (1793) and Beachy Head, she herself benefited from the income and slave labour of Richard Smith's plantations, and assisted in the family business that her husband had abandoned by helping Richard Smith with his correspondence.

by Charlotte Turner Smith.

In The Old Manor House (1794), Charlotte Smith combines elements of the romance, the Gothic, recent history, and culture to produce both a social document and a compelling novel. A “property romance,” the love story of Orlando and Monimia revolves around the Manor House as inheritable property. In situating their romance as dependent on the whims of property owners, Smith critiques a society in love with money at the expense of its most vulnerable members, the dispossessed.

Appendices in this edition include: contemporary responses; writings on the genre debate by Anna Letitia Barbauld, John Moore, and Walter Scott; and historical documents focusing on property laws as well as the American and French revolutions.