Download Shadows of Death fb2

by H.P. Lovecraft
Download Shadows of Death fb2
Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    H.P. Lovecraft
  • ISBN:
    0345483332
  • ISBN13:
    978-0345483331
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Del Rey (October 25, 2005)
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1304 kb
  • ePUB format
    1747 kb
  • DJVU format
    1755 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    398
  • Formats:
    mbr azw doc lrf


The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear. is fear of the unknown. Praise for. H. p. lovecraft. Lovecraft’s fiction is one of the cornerstones of modern horror. Lovecraft has yet to be surpassed as the twentieth century’s greatest practitioner of the classic horror tale. Lovecraft’s influenced people as diverse as Stephen King and Colin Wilson, Umberto Eco and John Carpenter.

His writing appeared in some of his era’s most famous pulp magazines, but as no book of his work was published in his lifetime, Lovecraft died in relative poverty and obscurity

Часто встречающиеся слова и выражения. His writing appeared in some of his era’s most famous pulp magazines, but as no book of his work was published in his lifetime, Lovecraft died in relative poverty and obscurity. Since his death he has been recognized as one of the most influential cult horror writers of the twentieth century. His influence on American horror can be detected in the work of Stephen King, Anne Rice, Clive Barker, and many others.

Shadows of Death book. Descend into the nerve-shattering realm of America’s master of horror, H. Lovecraft–to a dank place where gloomy maelstroms await the unwary, where the unnatural is surpassed only by the unspeakable, and where all pleasure is perverse. All you can lose is your sanity.

Read "Shadows of Death Terrifying Tales by H. Lovecraft" by .

Howard Phillips Lovecraft (US: /ˈlʌvkræft/; August 20, 1890 – March 15, 1937) was an American writer of weird fiction and horror fiction

Howard Phillips Lovecraft (US: /ˈlʌvkræft/; August 20, 1890 – March 15, 1937) was an American writer of weird fiction and horror fiction. Born in Providence, Rhode Island, he spent most of his life there, and his fiction was primarily set against a New England backdrop. He died of cancer at the age of 46.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

That was the first I ever heard of shadowed Innsmouth. Any reference to a town not shewn on common maps or listed in recent guide-books would have interested me, and the agent’s odd manner of allusion roused something like real curiosity

That was the first I ever heard of shadowed Innsmouth. Any reference to a town not shewn on common maps or listed in recent guide-books would have interested me, and the agent’s odd manner of allusion roused something like real curiosity. A town able to inspire such dislike in its neighbours, I thought, must be at least rather unusual, and worthy of a tourist’s attention.

The Disciples of Death's Shadow is a fictional organization in the CthulhuTech pencil-and-paper roleplaying game by Wildfire LLC. The Disciples of Death's Shadows is an organization which is secretly devoted to Nyarlathotep. They are mainly based in North Africa, the Middle East, and parts of Central Asia but has a presence throughout the world

Terrifying Tales by H. Lovecraft

Terrifying Tales by H. Lovecraft-to a dank place where gloomy maelstroms await the unwary, where the unnatural is surpassed only by the unspeakable, and where all pleasure is perverse. Featuring an introduction by Harlan Ellison.

Descend into the nerve-shattering realm of America’s master of horror, H. P. Lovecraft—to a dank place where gloomy maelstroms await the unwary, where the unnatural is surpassed only by the unspeakable, and where all pleasure is perverse. Take a chance . . .  all you can lose is your sanity. The Doom That Came to Sarnath—The magnificent city had wealth beyond measure, but no riches could save it from a ghastly day of reckoning. The Shunned House—He vowed to rid the odious structure of the brooding horror that clung to it, but evil would not go gently. The Dream Quest of Unknown Kadath—Desperate to understand his tormenting vision, one man begins a forbidden and nightmarish journey. The Tomb—The old Hyde family crypt held a gruesome attraction for a boy, until he communed with the dead and learned their secrets. The Shadow Out of Time—The quest to understand the devouring force that once possessed a scholar leads a man to the other side of the world, where all will be revealed in one hideous, unholy night. Plus eleven other macabre tales of pure terror!

Hanad
I just return'd to this collection because Harlan Ellison's recent death made me want to reread his Introduction. I met Mr Ellison when ye Nebula Awards came to Seattle, and he was very kind to me, a lovely and decent gent indeed. I did not know then that he shared my love for Lovecraft's weird fiction. In ye introduction he quotes the words he wrote when invited by The Library of America to blurb their edition of Lovecraft's TALES that had been edited by Peter Straub: "H. P. Lovecraft was, is, and very likely will ALWAYS be, the irregularly beating heart of darkness of American fantastic literature." The charm of this wee pb edition is that it presents such a varied selection of Lovecraft's work. Ye Contents is:
Introduction by Harlan Ellison
"The Shadow Out of Time"
"The Festival"
"Celephais"
"The Tomb"
"The Shunned House"
"Polaris"
"The Other Gods"
"The Strange High House in the Mist"
"What the Moon Brings"
"The Doom That Came to Sarnath"
The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath
Early Tale
The Beast in the Cave
The Alchemist
Poetry and the Gods
The Street
The Transition of Juan Romero
Fragments
Azathoth
The Descendent
The Book
The Thing in the Moonlight

Many critics have concluded that "The Shadow Out of Time" is Lovecraft's best story, and rereading it again in this edition has reminded me of its excellence and originality. But among those tales that are regarded as Lovecraft's "lesser" efforts, there are a number of which I am peculiarly fond. In this book, I always return to the section called "Fragments", and I am glad to find therein "The Thing in the Moonlight", a story by J. Chapman Miske that incorporates portions of a letter Lovecraft wrote to Donald Wandrei on 24 November 1927. Because this was never meant by Lovecraft to be number'd among his tales, some editors have refused to include it in their editions of HPL's Complete Fiction. However, I find that portion that is decidedly penned by E'ch-Pi-El to be extremely cool and effective, and I am always glad to see some editor include it. One curious aspect of this pb edition is that no editor is listed by name, unless I missed it.

This is the second in this series publish'd by Del Rey. To ye best of my knowledge, no editor is listed. If you have a chum who has not yet discover'd the weird fiction of H. P. Lovecraft, Esq., this wee volume wou'd prove an excellent introduction to the Dreamer of Providence.
Haracetys
The literary attachment to ancient times in which people like us had a great feast as the eldritch greener undersea idol resumes what we no longer see where a marshy shore has a detestable water-lizard.
Shaktiktilar
Lovecraft notoriously relies on mood rather than piddling concerns like dialogue or plot, so it's perhaps not surprising that his longer works falter. That's particularly true in this collection, which contains the mind-numbingly dull "The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath," which left me longing for a Lovecraft/Nightmare on Elm Street crossover wherein I could send Freddy Krueger after Randolph Carter to finish the meandering bastard off once and for all.

The other issue with this particular collection is that most of the tales, like the aforementioned horror that is "The Dream-Quest", are set in worlds totally of Lovecraft's fevered imagining, which seem to sport a lot of showy lapidary work but not much else. Characters move through strange realms as if there were a spotlight upon them, illuminating only what they approach without ever giving any kind of clear view of the world as a whole (or why all the realms seem so hung up on decorative stone work). Frankly, the author's work is more effective when he brings this kind of nebulous feeling to a more familiar setting, like his storied New England. That breeds horror; the other just breeds the desire for a roadmap, a good flashlight, and possibly a fence who deals in lapis.

Still, if for no other reason this collection is worthwhile for the inclusion of the three page short "The Book," which is utterly delightful for taking the concept of books changing your life and turning it on its head and giving it tentacles. Sadly, this book fails to pack the punch of that story's worm-riddled tome.
Fearlesssinger
A good collection of short stories by Lovecraft, building to a climax with The Dream-quest of Unknown Kadath. There are a few unfinished works at the end that feel tacked on, but one of his early short stories: The Beast in the Cave is one my personal favorites.
Zieryn
Good, cheap collection of some of Lovecraft's best stories, including The Shadow Out of Time, The Tomb, and the Dream Quest of Unknown Kadath.