Download Shine Shine Shine fb2

by Lydia Netzer
Download Shine Shine Shine fb2
Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Lydia Netzer
  • ISBN:
    1250007070
  • ISBN13:
    978-1250007070
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    St. Martin's Press; 3rd Printing edition (July 17, 2012)
  • Pages:
    320 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1440 kb
  • ePUB format
    1214 kb
  • DJVU format
    1798 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    350
  • Formats:
    txt mobi lrf mbr


Robots, motherhood, death, and true love. NYT Notable Book ue books I have ever read.

Robots, motherhood, death, and true love. People Magazine "People's Pick  . ue books I have ever read. The audio version gives its perfect life from the inside and outside of people, through Joshilyn Jackson and music, original music, that says what words can't tell us. I'll write more about it somewhere else, but I had to get this down here, right now, before I busted open with the spiritual force that only comes with waking up.

Shine Shine Shine is a nove. ut "Shine, Shine, Shine" could easily refer to Netzer's writing abilities, the way she handles the craft of storytelling, and the way her novel captures and holds the reader's attentio. etzer is a master storyteller

Shine Shine Shine is a nove. etzer is a master storyteller. She leads the reader through a landscape full of beauty and charged with pitfalls, actual and emotional, while holding your eyes to the page, and your fingers itching to turn to the next page.

The opening lines of Lydia Netzer’s first novel, Shine Shine Shine, read like a cyber-alloy of astrophysical and metaphysical poetry - imagine Wordsworth recast by Carl Sagan. It’s tempting to arrange them as a stanza

The opening lines of Lydia Netzer’s first novel, Shine Shine Shine, read like a cyber-alloy of astrophysical and metaphysical poetry - imagine Wordsworth recast by Carl Sagan. It’s tempting to arrange them as a stanza: Deep in darkness, there was a tiny light. Inside the light, he floated in a spaceship. It felt cold to him, floating there. Inside his body, he felt the cold of space. The he in the lyric is Maxon Mann, a tall, brave and sexy (if geeky) Nobel Prize-winning scientist, not quite 30 years old, who builds robots that can cry, dream, laugh and make other robots.

A debut of singular power and intelligence, Shine Shine Shine is a unique love story, an adventure between worlds, and a stunning novel of love, death, and what it means to be human.

Author: Lydia Netzer. Publisher: St. Martin’s Press, New York, 2012. A debut of singular power and intelligence, Shine Shine Shine is a unique love story, an adventure between worlds, and a stunning novel of love, death, and what it means to be human. Shine Shine Shine is a New York Times Notable Book of 2012.

Shine Shine Shine is a New York Times Notable Book of 2012. LYDIA NETZER was born in Detroit and educated in the Midwest. She lives in Virginia with her two home-schooled children and math-making husband. When she isn't teaching, reading, or writing her next novel, she plays the guitar in a rock band.

A debut unlike any other, Shine Shine Shine by Lydia Netzer is a shocking, searing, breathless love story, a gripping portrait of modern family, and a stunning exploration of love, death and what it means to be human

A debut unlike any other, Shine Shine Shine by Lydia Netzer is a shocking, searing, breathless love story, a gripping portrait of modern family, and a stunning exploration of love, death and what it means to be human. Sunny Mann has masterminded a perfect life for herself and her family in a quiet Virginia town.

Shine Shine Shine breaks free of the gravitational pull of traditional romantic clich�s. The Washington Post "Lydia Netzer's luminous debut novel concerns what lies beneath society's pretty surfaces Sunny's congenital hairlessness, her husband's remoteness, their son's autism. What makes it unexpectedly moving is how skillfully Netzer then peels back those layers, finding heartbreaking depth even in characters who lack ordinary social skills.

A New York Times Notable Book!

"Over the moon with a metaphysical spin. Heart-tugging…it is struggling to understand the physical realities of life and the nature of what makes us human….Nicely unpredictable…Extraordinary." ―Janet Maslin, The New York Times

When Maxon met Sunny, he was seven years, four months, and eighteen-days old. Or, he was 2693 rotations of the earth old. Maxon was different. Sunny was different. They were different together.

Now, twenty years later, they are married, and Sunny wants, more than anything, to be "normal." She's got the housewife thing down perfectly, but Maxon, a genius engineer, is on a NASA mission to the moon, programming robots for a new colony. Once they were two outcasts who found unlikely love in each other: a wondrous, strange relationship formed from urgent desire for connection. But now they're parents to an autistic son. And Sunny is pregnant again. And her mother is dying in the hospital. Their marriage is on the brink of imploding, and they're at each other's throats with blame and fear. What exactly has gone wrong?

Sunny wishes Maxon would turn the rocket around and come straight-the-hell home.

When an accident in space puts the mission in peril, everything Sunny and Maxon have built hangs in the balance. Dark secrets, long-forgotten murders, and a blond wig all come tumbling to the light. And nothing will ever be the same.…

A debut of singular power and intelligence, Shine Shine Shine is a unique love story, an adventure between worlds, and a stunning novel of love, death, and what it means to be human.

Shine Shine Shine is a New York Times Notable Book of 2012.


Paster
I have a love/hate relationship with SHINE SHINE SHINE. There are parts of this book that make me want to raise my hand in the air like I just don't care and shout for joy at the pure wonderfulness of the purity of the theme of removing masks and being who we are--and others' acceptance of our mask removal. That is so fantastically wonderful that I want to hug Lydia and tell her that she is pure genius. Sunny's baldness is a blatant metaphor without being in-your-face. I love it.

But I just don't understand why authors feel such a need to be so obscene and vile with the language. This story could be beautiful--without the language. I realize that this is a personal preference, but it took away from the power of the story for me. Why does the f-word have to be used? Why do young people always have to be so horny? Whatever happened to young people just being young people? Maybe I'm naive and more young people have sex than I am aware of or was ever aware of when I was growing up, but why is the sex between Sunny and Maxon when they were teens so important to the story??? Without it, I GOT that they BELONGED to one another and nothing could change that--including years apart.

Normally, I don't mind the time shifts where we start in the present and go back in time and so on and so forth, but this just got out of hand. There are quite a few flashbacks that are completely unnecessary unless it's actually the current time stories that are completely unnecessary.

So, does Maxon make it home, by some grand NASA miracle??? Or is that wishful thinking as he's running out of air again????

I liked SHINE SHINE SHINE, but I didn't like it. I liked it enough to say that I'm glad I read it and considering the fact that it is my understanding that Lydia Netzer wrote the first draft during NaNo, I admire her and the story from that perspective even more. One of these days, I'll do something with one of my NaNo manuscripts and maybe Lydia will return the favor and read mine. :) I'll recommend the book to others, certainly. I just wish I didn't have to wade through the language and the sexual content. Not all modern readers "enjoy" that in the books they choose.
LONUDOG
** spoiler alert ** Hm, I know I'm not the first to say I'm not real sure what to say about this book, nor am I the first to say that it is very unique. And of course, like so many others, that is something I really like about this book.

HOWEVER, the synopsis I originally read did not do me any justice because the book I read didn't follow through as...interesting in terms of pace. Sure the characters are very interesting and I love the overall story of their nerd love. I'm a bit of a nerd myself so I liked her inclusion of equations and descriptions of their "strange" interactions with each other. This book was great in the sense that it highlighted a relationship that you don't see all the time, if ever and is not one you're going to get to see behind the curtain so-to-speak in real life.

That said to say the book is sci-fi, and about astronauts and space is very misleading; this may give the reader the sense that this is really a book about going into space in a more active sense than what really occurs. Maxxon, the husband (who may be autistic), is a genius who goes into space but those scenes are very muted and not very interesting. Instead you end up feeling like the story is more about Sunny and more about their relationship than anything to do with Maxon colonizing the moon using his super robots. It's kind of like those previews you see for movies with a lot of crazy CGI then when you watch the movie you find out that all the good parts were in those previews and there was little more to witness.

To cut my review short I think this book would have been better served being a novella rather than a 336 page novel, although I read the kindle edition. I don't ever consciously quit a book otherwise I would have given up. Reading this for me seemed to take forever and I couldn't wait to stop to be honest. Then when the book did come to an end there was really no conclusion and certainly not a climax. I don't know if she plans a sequel to this but, no offense, I wasn't interested enough to read another installment like this, way too drawn out. There were many, many scenes that held my attention and I did like Sunny quite a bit and Lydia is a good writer but the story rambles on a lot to where those scenes and moments that got my attention quickly get worn out. And this happens a lot. What happened to me as well was that there's so much going on in this story with the characters' personal lives which is really well developed and the flashbacks to their childhood together, that you wind up waiting and waiting to reach a peak or for the story to turn and twist and do something more than just be interesting and unique. You wait for something to happen and it never really does.

So I loved the ingredients of this book but the overall recipe was very watered down without much punch or kick even though we get teased into thinking their will be, even from a romantic sense nothing is delivered. What does Sunny's new baby really look like, is she bald like Sunny? Does Maxxon ever make it home? Is Bubber, their autistic son, better off his medication overall? Does he improve? Now that Sunny has gone on to stop wearing her wig will she stop trying to be the cliche perfect housewife? Will she and Maxon's relationship grow and blossom now? Do these characters grow? What happens with Les Weathers now that we see he was losing his mind a bit? Does Maxon give up his dream to colonize the moon? (I ask these but unless a sequel was written very differently I couldn't bear this again to want to find out, took too long when I have so many other things to do.) The flashbacks are insightful but also drawn out and there isn't really too much extra to gain from them other than the couple's backstory which is well put together, touching, unique.

Sometimes I liked reading this, a lot of times it felt super slow and not worth the time. Unique story for sure, too long. Interesting, original characters, too much time in their head. Great idea, I don't think it was executed as well as it could be. But from a technical stand point it was written pretty good.

Thanks.
eLPy
Adorardana
Sunny Mann is a young woman who has been hairless from birth. To fit in better with her affluent friends, she never goes out in public without her false eyebrows, lashes, and an appropriate wig. Then her wig flies off in a car accident, and she vows never to put it on again. The accident seems to have jostled her senses a bit, because she also decides to take her autistic son Bubber off his meds, despite the fact that he has been evicted from his pre-school. To complete her renunciation of the artificial, she allows hospital staff to remove her mother from life support. And did I mention that she’s pregnant? Her husband Maxon’s life, on the other hand, revolves around the artificial—artificial intelligence, that is. Maxon, whom Sunny has known since childhood, is a high-functioning autistic savant and a Nobel-prize-winning robotics scientist. While Sunny is stripping down her tumultuous life in Virginia, Maxon is on his way to the moon. The mission’s cargo module contains robots that will build more robots from materials on the moon, to pave the way for human colonization. In other words, the Manns are not your typical family, but they grapple with very typical issues—guilt, anxiety, humiliation, marital strife, and indecision over what to bring to the neighborhood crafts bazaar. Dark secrets eventually come to light, but overall this is not a dark novel. It does indeed shine, as do its characters, who refuse to see themselves as victims of their afflictions. Sunny and Maxon are both strong individuals who never seem to doubt their ability to cope.