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by Emile Zola,Francis J. Reynolds
Download Jean Gourdon's Four Days (French Classics) fb2
Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Emile Zola,Francis J. Reynolds
  • ISBN:
    1595691227
  • ISBN13:
    978-1595691224
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Mondial (January 1, 2009)
  • Pages:
    108 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1639 kb
  • ePUB format
    1606 kb
  • DJVU format
    1541 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    304
  • Formats:
    docx rtf lit doc


Jean Gourdon's Four Days is a short novel by French author Émile Zola. Translated by Francis J. Reynolds.

Jean Gourdon's Four Days is a short novel by French author Émile Zola. Jean Gourdon's Four Days deserves to rank among the very best things to which Zola has signed his name. Jean Gourdon's Four Days was originally published in 1874 as Les Quatre Journees de Jean Gourdon, and was included in the collection of short fiction entitled Nouveaux Contes à Ninon. E-Book: ePUB, 16,400 words, average reading time 1 hour, 20 min. Unabridged full version.

Jean Gourdon's Four Days book. mile François Zola was an influential French novelist, the most important example of the literary school of naturalism, and a major figure in the political liberalization of France. More than half of Zola's novels were part of a set of 20 books collectively known as Les Rougon-Macquart.

Jean Gourdon's Four Days book

Jean Gourdon's Four Days book. Start by marking Jean Gourdon's Four Days as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The Four Days of Jean Gourdon" (Les Quatre Journees de Jean Gourdon; 1874, in: Nouveaux Contes a Ninon) deserves to rank among the very best things to which Zola has signed his name

The Four Days of Jean Gourdon" (Les Quatre Journees de Jean Gourdon; 1874, in: Nouveaux Contes a Ninon) deserves to rank among the very best things to which Zola has signed his name .

LibriVox recording of International Short Stories Volume 3: French Stories by Francis J. 20 - Jean Gourdon's Four Days Part 3 by Émile Zola download. 21 - Jean Gourdon's Four Days Part 4 by Émile Zola download. 22 - Baron de Trenck by Clémence Robert download.

VARIOUS ( - ) and Francis J. REYNOLDS (1867 - 1937). The third book of a three volume anthology of international short stories, we now turn to French stories. Jean Gourdon's Four Days Part 2 by Émile Zola. Authors include Honoré de Balzac, Voltaire, Guy de Maupassant, Victor Hugo and more. Compiled and translated by Francis J. Summary by Lynne Thompson.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Francis J Reynolds books . 3. Jean Gourdon's Four Days. International Short Stories - French.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Francis J Reynolds books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. Showing 1 to 30 of 72 results.

JEAN GOURDON'S FOUR DAYS By Emile Zola. BARON DE TRENCK By Clemence Robert. Upon learning that France had lost a battle on French soil, the young duke felt the blood mount to his face, giving him a horrible feeling of suffocation. THE PASSAGE OF THE RED SEA By Henry Murger.

Compiled by francis j. JEAN GOURDON'S FOUR DAYS By Emile Zola. A PIECE OF BREAD By Francois Coppee. THE ELIXIR OF LIFE By Honore de Balzac. THE AGE FOR LOVE By Paul Bourget.

"The Four Days of Jean Gourdon" (Les Quatre Journees de Jean Gourdon; 1874, in: Nouveaux Contes a Ninon) deserves to rank among the very best things to which Zola has signed his name. It is a study of four typical days in the life of a Provençal peasant of the better sort, told by the man himself... --- In the first of these it is "Spring": Jean Gourdon is eighteen years of age, and he steals away from the house of his uncle Lazare, a country priest, that he may meet his coy sweetheart Babet by the waters of the broad Durance... Next follows a day in "Summer," five years later; Jean, as a soldier in the Italian war, goes through the horrors of a battle and is wounded. This episode, which has something in common with the "Sevastopol" of Tolstoy, is exceedingly ingenious in its observation of the sentiments of a common man under fire... The "Autumn" of the story occurs fifteen years later. Jean and Babet have now long been married. They are rich, healthy, devoted to one another, respected by all their neighbours; but there is a single happiness lacking - they have no child. Only now, when the corn and the grapes are ripe, this gift also is to be theirs... The optimistic tone has hitherto been so consistently preserved, that one must almost resent the tragedy of the fourth day. This is eighteen years later, on a Winter's night: The river Durance rises in spate... --- It is impossible to give an impression of the charm and romantic sweetness of this little masterpiece. It raises many curious reflections to consider that this exquisitely pathetic pastoral, with all its gracious and tender personages, should have been written by the master of Naturalism, the author of "Germinal" and of "Pot-Bouille" ("Piping Hot!"). (Edmund Gosse)

Dynen
Jean Gourdon’s Four Days is a novella by Emile Zola. It was originally published in 1874, and was included in the collection of short fiction entitled Nouveaux Contes à Ninon. About 80 pages in length, the story is divided into four chapters. Each is a day in the life of the title character, a common farmer who resides along the Durance River in Provence. Each day takes place in a different season, beginning with Spring, and each represents the four seasons of a man’s life, from boyhood to old age. Although the days are spaced decades apart, these brief glimpses are enough to give the reader an understanding of the arc of this man’s life in its entirety.

Although perhaps a little more Romantic than his renowned Rougon-Macquart series of novels, Les Quatre Journées de Jean Gourdon, as it’s titled in French, is nonetheless a brilliant example of Zola’s mature Naturalistic style. He depicts the natural landscape of Gourdon’s homeland and the intricate details of his everyday life with vivid clarity, which allows the reader to intimately inhabit this character’s world. Yet despite the lucid imagery, there is an ambiguous universality to this man’s life that can be applied to the life of any human being. The quadripartite structure of the story allows Zola to write about four of his favorite subjects: love, war, agriculture, and death. Though this is a depiction of ordinary life, ordinary lives are often punctuated by extraordinary events, and Gourdon’s is no exception. Zola draws parallels between the arc of an individual’s life and the eternal life cycle of nature, granting a dignity and gravity to the existence of the common man. The result is incredibly life-affirming and poignant. At least, this is true of the first three chapters.

On the fourth day, some stumbling blocks arise. The problem with the book’s final section is that it’s almost identical to another novella Zola published in 1880, which I had previously read. Finding the same narrative here again in only slightly altered form was somewhat disappointing. I’m not going to give the name of this other work of short fiction because the title of the piece would reveal a plot spoiler. The occurrence that takes place in both works is handled much better in the exceptional work of 1880. In the life of Jean Gourdon, it just feels out of place, an unfortunate departure from the tone of the overall story. Even if I had not read that other work, and had not been aware of the redundancy, I still think the effect of the final chapter would have been jarring. This incongruity prevents Jean Gourdon’s Four Days from rising to the level of masterpiece, but nevertheless, this is still a great piece of literature. It’s not one of Zola’s absolute best, but certainly a successful effort, and one that any true fan of Zola should read.
Qutalan
A description of four days in a man's life, accompanied by the seasons. Which is...so trite, really. Granted, the details of the life of a common man is somewhat interesting, but pairing it with such an overdone allegory really mars the subject, for me. And perhaps it wouldn't be so bad to have the allegory if it was just in the background, but it is there, being discussed by the main characters, how man has his spring, summer, fall, and winter, and it's just shoved in your face.

I won't say avoid this piece, but I wouldn't think of it when recommending stories to anyone.