Download Pale Horse Coming fb2

by Stephen Hunter
Download Pale Horse Coming fb2
Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Stephen Hunter
  • ISBN:
    0671035460
  • ISBN13:
    978-0671035464
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Pocket Star Books; First Edition edition (December 1, 2002)
  • Pages:
    594 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1779 kb
  • ePUB format
    1943 kb
  • DJVU format
    1139 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    621
  • Formats:
    mobi rtf lit txt


Hunter is Robert B. Parker on steroids. Mickey Spillane with a thesaurus.

Hunter is Robert B. He writes crime like no one before him. -The Denver Post. Virtually un-put-downable gothic chiller. Classic hard-boiled fictio. .Features some of Hunter’s best writing. Violent Screen: A Critic’s 13 Years on.

Pale Horse Coming (. ISBN 0-684-86361-8) is a novel by Stephen Hunter published in 2001. It is his second book in the series featuring the character of Earl Swagger. Sam Vincent, an attorney, is hired by Davis Trugood, a Chicago lawyer to verify the death of the Trugood's client's manservant in Thebes, Mississippi, a desolate shantytown cut off from civilization and surrounded by swampland and seemingly impenetrable piney woods

Pale Horse Coming, featuring Stephen Hunter’s beloved sniper heroes Earl and Bob Lee Swagger, the first of eleven Swagger thrillers from the Pulitzer Prize-winning author.

Pale Horse Coming, featuring Stephen Hunter’s beloved sniper heroes Earl and Bob Lee Swagger, the first of eleven Swagger thrillers from the Pulitzer Prize-winning author. A smooth-talking Chicago lawyer comes to chat with Sam Vincent, the former prosecutor of Polk County, Arkansas, about a dangerous subject-a big prison for violent black convicts near Thebes, Mississippi, up the Yaxahatchee River from Pasagoula. Thebes seems to have dropped out of the Union-letters and phone calls go unanswered, and the lawyer has questions that need answers. Would Sam-an ex-lawman, a white.

Stephen Hunter's book, PALE HORSE COMING, is the second book in his Earl Swagger series, following HOT SPRINGS. Like the first book, I listened to the abridged audiobook read by Jay O. Sanders. The plot gets tangled from the beginning, but I trust Hunter's writing implicitly

Stephen Hunter's book, PALE HORSE COMING, is the second book in his Earl Swagger series, following HOT SPRINGS. The plot gets tangled from the beginning, but I trust Hunter's writing implicitly. I may be confused for a while out of the blocks, but by the end of the race I know he'll put all his cards on the table and I'll know everything. Part of the excitement of this book is trying to figure out everything that's going on behind the scenes.

Stephen Hunter ned the cardboard box flat. He had very little room to move, not without disturbing his hands and somehow altering the tension on the ribbon which, if he had figured this thing out correctly, could release the firing pin of what had to be an M1 Pull Firing Device, or something similar, which would allow the spring-driven striker to plunge forward against whatever primer was i.

Earl Swagger, the gritty WWII-vet hero of Hunter’s bestselling thriller Hot Springs, is back in this virtually un-put-downable gothic chiller about unspeakable evil in the murky Mississippi bayous

Author: Stephen Hunter. Earl Swagger, the gritty WWII-vet hero of Hunter’s bestselling thriller Hot Springs, is back in this virtually un-put-downable gothic chiller about unspeakable evil in the murky Mississippi bayous. In 1951, five years after the conclusion of Hot Springs, straight arrow ex-county prosecutor Sam Vincent tells Earl - his trusted friend and former investigator, now a sergeant in the Arkansas state police - that he has been hired by a Chicago attorney to travel to Thebes, a mythic prison camp in the remote backwaters of Mississippi to verify the death of a black.

Awesome book for the Stephen Hunter Fans. This book is rivoting and keeps your interst.

He has been reading the book constantly ever since it arrived, he cant put it down, he says it grabs you from the first page. He says probably the best book by Hunter that he has read and he has loved all his books. Awesome book for the Stephen Hunter Fans. A book you cant put down once you start, unfortunately over five hundred pages so most people would have to put the book down.

Pale Horse Coming, featuring Stephen Hunter’s beloved sniper heroes Earl and Bob Lee Swagger, the first of eleven Swagger thrillers from the Pulitzer Prize-winning author.The time is 1951. A smooth-talking Chicago lawyer comes to chat with Sam Vincent, the former prosecutor of Polk County, Arkansas, about a dangerous subject—a big prison for violent black convicts near Thebes, Mississippi, up the Yaxahatchee River from Pasagoula. Thebes seems to have dropped out of the Union—letters and phone calls go unanswered, and the lawyer has questions that need answers. Would Sam—an ex-lawman, a white man and a Southerner—agree to go up there and find out what he can? The ex-prosecutor takes on the job, but first he goes to see his old friend Earl Swagger, and tells him that if he isn’t back in a week, Earl is to come looking for him. When Sam vanishes into the mists and swamps around Thebes, Mississippi, Earl packs his gun, explains to a distraught Junie that duty is duty and a promise is a promise, and sets off for Thebes, Mississippi to track his friend down. Soon enough, Earl—who approaches Thebes and its sinister prison with the stealth of a good Marine on a recon mission—realizes that something very strange indeed is going on there, that the prison is more than just a place that chills the blood of even the most hardened convict, that in fact the whole town of Thebes is hiding a secret—and it’s a place where people disappear all too easily, particularly inquisitive strangers, for whom burial in the swamps follows torture.

Gamba
Stephen Hunter is the king of a niche that no one knew existed until he came along.
Hunter, the film critic for the Washington Post, knows more about rifles and ammunition than any man on earth, and will go on for page after page of muzzle velocities, sighting ribs, minute-of-angles, gun barrel alloys, and neck turned rounds until you admit it.
His heroes, the Swagger clan of Arkansas, routinely take apart entire squads of bad guys. Earl is deadly with fists or guns but doesn't need the guns unless he's taking on a dozen or more, while son--and master sniper--Bob Lee Swagger relies on his trusty and ever-present sniper rifle.
There is always the sense in Hunter's work that the narrative is barely tethered to reality, but, as in his last novel, Hot Springs, his writing skills and his inclusion of historic figures and factual accuracy manage to hold the line and keep the reader turning the pages. PALE HORSE COMING, however, slips its moorings, lifts off like a weather balloon over Roswell, and drifts right off into space.
Set in the 50s, this is Big Earl's show. Somewhere deep in the swamps of the Mississippi bayou (what would the world do without Mississippi when we need some really bad white guys) is Thebes State Prison, filled with the worst bunch of killers, spree killers, and serial killers known to man.
The problem is that the guys running the prison are even worse. The way Earl knows they are worse, see, is that they are mean to the killers, plus, when Earl breaks into the prison, they are mean to him. I know, I know, it is a little odd to break into prison, but take it up with Earl.
Anyway, Earl's job-you know he will accept it or there wouldn't be a book-is to see that justice is done by killing all the prison officers and freeing the criminals. Of course, that means the killers will be set free on the citizens of Mississippi, but that doesn't bother Earl, because his family lives in Arkansas.
So what Earl does is recruit some guys who no one ever heard of, but who are famous in the world of gun magazines (the fact that some of them are almost a hundred years old doesn't make any difference to Earl), plus Audie Murphy (don't ask me, the only reason I can figure is that Audie is dead so you can say anything you want about him and not get sued).
Since Audie is a rich, famous, movie star living in a big mansion with beautiful women surrounding him, you might think he would not be interested in risking his life in a swamp to help some guy from Arkansas he has never heard of kill a bunch of state employees. You are not Earl, though.
By now, Earl is no longer just a guy who can beat up anyone in a fight or kill whole platoons of armed men, he has become wiser than Dr Laura and Dr Phil put together. He just looks at Audie and says, "you're not happy are you?" Audie is so shocked that someone has finally been smart enough to see just how bad he has it, being a movie star and all, that he immediately throws it all over to go kill people with Earl.
Well, a bunch of stuff happens and events finally become so confused that Earl tells everyone how Billy the Kid took part in the Johnson County War, an event that occurred 30 years after Billy was shot dead by Pat Garrett, and in Wyoming, which has to be at least 1,000 miles from New Mexico.
"This is all just one big misunderstanding," Earl says at one point. My thoughts exactly.
Redfury
Stephen Hunter's book, PALE HORSE COMING, is the second book in his Earl Swagger series, following HOT SPRINGS. Like the first book, I listened to the abridged audiobook read by Jay O. Sanders.

The plot gets tangled from the beginning, but I trust Hunter's writing implicitly. I may be confused for a while out of the blocks, but by the end of the race I know he'll put all his cards on the table and I'll know everything. Part of the excitement of this book is trying to figure out everything that's going on behind the scenes. I had most of it, but Hunter is a master storyteller that threw some surprises and curves my way.

Before I get into the book, I want to talk about Jay O. Sanders's reading. I found the man absolutely amazing in both books I've listened to. Sanders has an ear for Southern dialect and thinking that's unparalleled. Growing up in Oklahoma as I have, I know when people are affecting the local accent without truly knowing it. Sanders talks the talk like a native. He should. He was born in Austin, Texas. His rendition of Earl Swagger is fantastic and I truly hope he does more of Stephen Hunter's books. He's a good fit for the series, just as Will Patton is a good fit for James Lee Burke's novels.

It's 1951 and Earl Swagger is an Arkansas State Trooper in this one. His friendship with Sam Vincent, an attorney, that compels him to action. Sam has been hired by a Chicago attorney named Davis Truegood to find out exactly what happened to an inmate of Mississippi's infamous Thebes prison farm. Sam's journey through the backwoods country is deftly portrayed and comes to life in Sanders's narration. The modern world (relatively speaking) drops away in a short time and the atmosphere becomes grim and threatening.

In no time at all, Sam arrives in Thebes and begins asking the wrong kinds of questions. Generally those are the ones that end with a question mark, and even thinking them aloud can get you into trouble. The trouble with the small town sheriff oozes with menace, then things turn even more nasty when Sam realizes he can't just walk away from the situation and let it go. After he returns in the still of the night to get some paperwork so he can start an investigation, the sheriff frames him for murder.

By this point I was totally immersed in the story. I knew that Earl Swagger was going to saddle up and rescue his friend. That's what a Marine Corps first sergeant who was awarded the Medal of Honor in Guadalcanal does. And Earl does it in fine fashion. Unfortunately, the rescue goes sour and he's left behind when Sam makes his escape.

For weeks Earl is held at the prison, and he's treated unmercifully. The warden's favorite guard, a hulking goliath called Big Boy, tortures Earl to find out who he really is. Earl sticks to his story that he's just a man named Jack Bogash who was scouting land to lease for deer hunting. This part of the novel kept reminding me of the Paul Newman movie, COOL HAND LUKE -- only a lot meaner.

Eventually, though, Earl finds a means to escape. And when he does, he promises to return to the prison and destroy it, burn it to the ground and not leave a stick standing. If you've read and enjoyed HOT SPRINGS, you know that a man like Earl Swagger is fully capable of exacting such a terrible promise.

I listened to the novel during several hours of a recent road trip, and I was clinging to every word. The images played through my mind like a movie, and they marched inexorably on to a fine and righteous vengeance. If you like strong male action-adventure novels, PALE HORSE COMING is a great one.

The action, the tough-guy dialogue, the reprehensible villains, and the atmosphere of the backwoods Mississippi of the 1950s is awesome. This book would make a good movie, and now that Hollywood has discovered the Swagger family (Bob Lee Swagger in SHOOTER starring Mark Wahlberg), I can only hope that someone realizes that another great movie franchise would be about Earl Swagger.

Stephen Hunter's main career focus has been on being a film critic. He's noted for being a demanding viewer, first for THE BALTIMORE SUN then for THE WASHINGTON POST. So far he's written seven novels about the Swagger family. The newest, THE 47th SAMURAI, hits the bookshelves on September 11, 2007 and stars Bob Lee in a story that ties back to Earl's days in World War II.
Uylo
When I was about 9 I read The Scarlet Letter; I recall how offended I was that anyone would make a person go through such public humiliation. I was very strongly offended by the inhumanity of some (too many) of my fellow humans. The next book that affected me so strongly was Jerzy Kozynski's The Painted Bird, again a story about how inhumane humans can be, only this time there was a very strong physical element involved in the cruelty. Now comes Pale Horse Coming comes along and encompasses not only the emotional but also the physical aspects of cruelty but also the morally righteous response to it by Earl Swagger. The one factor of the book that I found to be too fantastic was the inclusion of well known gun aficionados as characters; I think Earl could have gathered some of his former Marines and some of his fellow LEO's to address the issue, much as he did by bringing in his old buddy-arranged helicopter insertion/extraction. Still, an excellent read and adds to the strength of my moral compass.
Taun
This is the kind of story that grips me and won't let go. It's a novel--yes--but it is cobbled together from true tales of the inhumane treatment of African American men and how Caucasian Americans continued slavery in the form of prisons where we incarcerated black men (and we continue to do so) because they were black men. It's exciting, with a thrilling one of those, "Yes, we're only 6 men, but let's take that hill" battles as an ending.