Download Last Empress fb2

by Alexandra O'Karma,Anchee Min
Download Last Empress fb2
Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Alexandra O'Karma,Anchee Min
  • ISBN:
    1428143521
  • ISBN13:
    978-1428143524
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Recorded Books; Unabridged edition (March 20, 2007)
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1839 kb
  • ePUB format
    1527 kb
  • DJVU format
    1731 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    416
  • Formats:
    rtf azw docx txt


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The Last Empress Audiobook. Anchee Min (Author), Alexandra O'Karma (Narrator), Recorded Books (Publisher) & 0 more.

Anchee Min. Houghton mifflin company. Books by anchee min. Red Azalea. For information about permission to reproduce selections. from this book, write to Permissions, Houghton Mifflin Company, 215 Park Avenue South, New York, New York 10003. Visit our Web site: ww. .The last empress, Anchee Min. p. cm. ISBN-13: 978-0-618-53146-2.

In Min's first book, EMPRESS ORCHID, Alexandra O'Karma portrayed a 17-year-old concubine whose feisty temperament gained her entrance to the bed of the emperor and put her in a powerful position

In Min's first book, EMPRESS ORCHID, Alexandra O'Karma portrayed a 17-year-old concubine whose feisty temperament gained her entrance to the bed of the emperor and put her in a powerful position. Now Empress Tzu Hsi, who is based on a real-life nineteenth-century figure, is middle-aged, and O'Karma's voice portrait is mature and weary. This makes more and more sense as Empress Orchid ages and faces nonstop personal and political stresses. She gives up the man she loves, sees her birth son die, and discovers her adopted son's weakness

Written by Anchee Min. Narrated by Alexandra O'Karma. The Last Empress is the story of Orchid’s dramatic transition from a strong-willed, instinctive young woman to a wise and politically savvy leader who ruled China for more than four decades

Written by Anchee Min. The Last Empress is the story of Orchid’s dramatic transition from a strong-willed, instinctive young woman to a wise and politically savvy leader who ruled China for more than four decades. In this concluding volume Min gives us a compelling, very human leader who assumed power reluctantly and sacrificed all to protect those she loved and an empire that was doomed to die. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Publisher: Recorded Books AudioReleased: Jan 1, 2007ISBN: 1436102405Format: audiobook.

In a nutshell, Empress Orchid sweeps readers into the heart of the Forbidden City to tell the fascinating story of a young concubine who becomes China’s last empress. Min introduces the beautiful Tzu Hsi, known as Orchid (based on the real-life Empress Dowager Cixi), and "weaves an epic of a country girl who seized power through seduction, murder, and endless intrigue. When China is threatened by enemies, she alone seems capable of holding the country together.

The Last Empress book. See a Problem? We’d love your help. The last decades of the nineteenth century were a violent period.

Anchee Min The Last Empress The second book in the Empress Orchid series, 2007AUTHOR'S NOTE All of the characters in this book are based on real people

Anchee Min The Last Empress The second book in the Empress Orchid series, 2007AUTHOR'S NOTE All of the characters in this book are based on real people. I tried my best to keep the events the way they were in history. I translated or transcribed the decrees, edicts and newspaper articles from the original documents. All of the characters in this book are based on real people. The seclusion, he said, would help him concentrate. Ying-t'ai was a paradise that had long been unoccupied. w causeway and a drawbridge. The pavilion had marble terraces dropping straight into the water, with canals spanned by pretty bridges between them. In the summer the surrounding lakes were covered by flotillas of green lotus. By August large pink flowers would shoot up from the green mats. The views were astonishing. When the restoration work started, I was asked to rename the.

All of the characters in this book are based on real people

Anchee Min. The Last Empress. The second book in the Empress Orchid series, 2007. As coregent with Empress Nuharoo until her son's maturity, Empress Orchid was at the beginning of a long and tumultuous reign that would last into the next century. 1. Mother's eyes were closed when she died.

Narrated by Alexandra O'Karma. The last decades of the nineteenth century were a violent period in China's history, marked by humiliating foreign incursions and.

The last decades of the nineteenth century were a violent period in China's history, marked by humiliating foreign incursions and domestic rebellions and ending in the demise of the Ch'ing Dynasty. The only constant during this tumultuous time was the power wielded by one woman, the resilient, ever-resourceful Tsu Hsi -- or Empress Orchid, as readers came to know her in Anchee Min's critically acclaimed, best-selling novel covering her rise to power. The Last Empress is the story of Orchid's dramatic transition from a strong-willed, instinctive young woman to a wise and politically savvy leader who ruled China for more than four decades. In this concluding volume Min gives us a compelling, very human leader who assumed power reluctantly and sacrificed all to protect those she loved and an empire that was doomed to die.

ᵀᴴᴱ ᴼᴿᴵᴳᴵᴻᴬᴸ
After devouring Empress Orchid in a single day, I found myself struggling to battle through this turgid sequel, which came as a surprise given that I had expected that as Min's main character moved toward consolidating power, her story would become more dramatic.

That may have been true of history, but not in this fictional recounting of the life of Tzu Hsi, aka Yehonala, or Orchid, the Manchu girl who becomes a concubine, then an Empress, then de facto dictator of China at the time of Queen Victoria. As the book opens, Orchid has buried her husband and must, alongside her fellow Empress, try to prevent the seizure of power by those who will try to destroy her infant son. Then she must tackle the bigger challenge of ruling the vast empire, as it comes under constant siege from Western powers. It's a two-front war that she is doomed to lose -- if she spends the time and attention that she needs to on running the empire's affairs, she can't spend it on the upbringing of the young Emperor who will take over the throne when he reaches his majority. The result is a series of tragedies that could have made for great dramatic fiction.

Alas... Min's narrative reads more as if Yehonala is recounting historical fact, with occasional bursts of dialogue to remind us that we're reading fiction. It's a lot of interior monologue, as well, a device that worked better in the first book when Yehonala's challenges were of a more domestic nature (how to bring herself to the attention of the Emperor, for instance.) Perhaps the problem is simply that the issues that the Empress had to deal with were so numerous and complex that it was impossible to do justice to them? In any event, Min, who has proved her ability to craft a gripping novel elsewhere, failed to deliver on this one.

As other reviewers have noted, it's rare to see a relatively positive portrayal of Yehonala, but Min makes a compelling case for viewing the empress as a victim of her times and circumstances, caught between warring factions and with limited room to manoeuver. In so many cases, it's hard to see how she could have acted differently, and the historical record of those actions is certainly open to the interpretation that Min ascribes to them, even if the mainstream view is a far less charitable one.

The real strengths of this novel lie in Min's command of the telling detail -- Yehonala's scroll paintings, retouched by her teacher; the freezing cold and scarcity of wood one winter; the horrors of her flight from the European invasion of Beijing after the Boxer Rebellion. In contrast to the first book, however, these are overwhelmed by sometimes tedious details of endless negotiating with court figures such as Prince Kung; one of these political battles began swiftly to feel very much like another.

Recommended only to die-hard fans of Empress Orchid, who should prepare for a disappointment.
Kata
I usually read a book within a couple of days but I put this one down repeatedly and came back to finish it more than once. The characters are not well developed and I really didn't care what happened to any of them one way or the other. Another problem was the sheer volume of new characters being thrown into the mix which just led to confusion. The actions of the characters in the book seemed weak and because of a lack of connection to the reader it became redundant. Person XYZ is fired, re-hired, shamed, sent back to his homeland, asked to return. Rinse and repeat.

A great deal of the book was spent trying to detail the intricacies of the political situation of the time period. So much so that it took over the entire last 3/4ths of the book and made it a very boring read. It began to read as a badly written historical novel w/o the correct historical data. Definitely not one of the author's finer novels.
Kigabar
Well done. This is a really good, and very entertaining piece of historical fiction. The breath and scope of its massive historical and cultural insights are fantastic for anyone desirous of obtaining an in-depth, rather than superficial view, of Chinese government, administration, culture and politics of a very interesting period in Chinese history. It does this in a surprisingly entertaining way. It is very well written, and deserves accolades as an excellent offering of a really enjoyable, well-crafted story providing a genuine look beneath the commonly misunderstood surface.
Frlas
I found this book to be very interesting reading. It was such an easy way to learn so much about the history of China and its emperors and empresses around the turn of the last century. If you like history told from a personal slant, this is a great read. I did also read the first book, "Empress Orchid" and found that it was a little bogged down in detail, but did lay the groundwork for this book. They can be read independently of each other though and I found this one to be much more interesting than the first book.
Mavegar
The first book Min writes about Tzu Hsi is better. But I guess there is no way around including the many historical characters with a maze of Chinese names that were difficult to keep apart. A more probable look at life in The Forbidden City gives a much more humane picture of who The Last Empress really was.
Keath
A sad tale in history of what its like to be an Empress.
Helldor
Being a fan of historical fictions, I enjoy reading books covering the recent centuries of China's rulers. With so much controversy surrounding the Dragon Empress, any book about her is bound to be interesting.

However this book, in addition to providing a lot of interesting information, provides the material in a very digestible narrative so that you never lose track of names, events, and locations.
This is a continuation of the story of Empress Orchid; the last Empress of China. In this sequel, the storyline continues from where Empress Orchid left off. This book contains a vast amount of politics regarding the opening of China to the western world, interwoven with Orchid's continuing struggle to maintain herself as Empress, then Regent, then Empress again during the upheaval in the Chinese Imperial Court.

For anyone who likes Chinese history, as I do, this is a very good book.

Carol M.