Download Bring Me His Ears fb2

by Clarence E. Mulford
Download Bring Me His Ears fb2
Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    Clarence E. Mulford
  • ISBN:
    1417924098
  • ISBN13:
    978-1417924097
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Kessinger Publishing, LLC (May 23, 2004)
  • Pages:
    360 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1122 kb
  • ePUB format
    1840 kb
  • DJVU format
    1189 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    866
  • Formats:
    mobi docx lrf mbr


Clarence Edward Mulford was born on February 3rd, 1883 in Streator, Illinois. Boyd shrugged his shoulders. Father set his heart on me becoming his junior partner, and to passing his work over to me when he was ready to retire

Clarence Edward Mulford was born on February 3rd, 1883 in Streator, Illinois. Father set his heart on me becoming his junior partner, and to passing his work over to me when he was ready to retire. Two generations of surgeons, is his boast; and in me he hoped to make it three. Against that, the West needs men! Those Oregon-bound wagons bring tears to my eyes.

By CLARENCE E. MULFORD. Printed in the United States of America.

By CLARENCE E. Chapter I. Hawkens' gun store. Hawkens' gun store

By CLARENCE E. The tall, lanky Missourian leaning against the corner of a ramshackle saloon on Locust Street, St. Louis, Missouri the St. Louis of the early forties turned his whiskey marked face toward his companion, a short and slender Mexican trader, sullenly listening to the latter's torrent of words, which was accompanied by many and excitable gesticulations. The Missourian shook his head in reply to the accusations of his companion. But he was on thee boat weeth us!" exclaimed the other. An' you lose heem lak.

Early 1840’s and the West is opening up. Wagon trains are headed to the Oregon Territories and Texas is still an independent republic. Tom Boyd is pushed into a Santa Fe street by the Mexican governor of New Mexico

Early 1840’s and the West is opening up. Tom Boyd is pushed into a Santa Fe street by the Mexican governor of New Mexico. Boyd slaps the man’s face and runs for his life.

Bring Me His Ears book. Clarence Edward Mulford was the author of Hopalong Cassidy, written in 1904. This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original  . He wrote it in Fryeburg, Maine, United States, and the many stories and 28 novels were followed by radio, feature film, television, and comic book versions. Clarence was born in Streator, Illinois. He died of complications from surgery in Portland, Maine. He set aside much of his money from his book for local charities. Other books in the series. Hopalong Cassidy (1 - 10 of 27 books). Books by Clarence E.

Tom reluctantly shook his head. It would only reopen the old bitterness and lead to further estrangement.

dim old shop and the noisy, bustling city beset him strongly, despite his years of a life unfitting him for the hardships of the prairies and mountains. Being able to read Greek and Latin was no asset on the open trail; although schoolmasters would be needed in that new country. I know how you feel, Mr. Boyd. Have you seen your father since you landed?" Tom reluctantly shook his head.

He set aside much of his money from his books for local charities. Bring Me His Ears (1922).

His biographer, Francis Nevins, characterized Mulford's writing as "rooted in Victorian convention  . He set aside much of his money from his books for local charities.

Clarence E. Mulford (3 February 1883 – 10 May 1956) was the author of Hopalong Cassidy, written in 1904. He wrote it in Fryeburg, Maine, United States, and the many stories and 28 novels were followed by radio, feature film, television, and comic book versions, often deviating significantly from the original stories, especially in the character's traits. While many of his stories depicted Cassidy and other men of the Bar-20 ranch, he also wrote novels (and short stories) of. other Westerners, starting with Johnny Nelson in 1920

By Clarence Edward Mulford. Hopalong Cassidy's Rustler Round-Up; Or, Bar-20. By Clarence Edward Mulford.

By Clarence Edward Mulford. The Coming of Cassidy-And the Others.

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.

Daizil
Clarence Mulford was just a very good writer. He obviously did his research into travel on the Missouri and overland to Santa Fe, NM. But his writing style is what makes his books so great.
Dianazius
A good western about new Mexico and Texas. There struggles and how Texas began their independence.
The_NiGGa
good read
Antuiserum
The story was a bit tedious at times and the vernacular hard to follow sometimes, as well. Overall, the plot was good and the storyline was compelling. The overall disposition of Armijo was somewhat disappointing though it did show some mercy which is often excluded. The language was appropriate to most ages while the style was not simplistic.
Unsoo
the Real Hoppy
Silverbrew
Great Mulford read. I love all his novels.
santa
much different than his hopalong series
Bring Me His Ears is a Clarence Mulford novel from 1922, and is written in a style few will enjoy in this day and age. Sometimes it is hard to follow and understand what Mr. Mulford is saying, especially so, because he uses "western" venacular to its extreme. An example, "Thar!" he said, explosively. "Hyar we air,an' we ain't a-goin' on ag'in till we kin see th' channel. No, sir, not if we has ter stay hyar a week!" Phonetically spelled words and chopped off words are in nearly every sentence in the dialogue. The copy I am taking this review from, I have owned for more than 30 years; it is a Thrilling Novels published by Popular Library in 1930's, abridged to speed the action. It measures 5 1/2 by 7 1/2 inches and runs 128 pages. The story involves Tom Boyd who finds himself rescuing Patience Cooper from Manuel Armijo, tyrant governor of New Mexico, who wanted revenge after Patience had rebuffed his advances. The time period for this book is the 1840's before the Mexican-American war when Santa Fe was still under Mexican rule. It is a good enough story and plot line, and has some excellent description of steam boat travel and caravan travel at the time. Had Mr. Mulford only written Hopalong Cassidy and Bar 20 novels it would have been enough to secure his place in publishing history, but his other work is just as good and acceptable reading. Glad he wrote other things.