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by William Peter Blatty
Download Legion: A Novel from the Author of The Exorcist fb2
Genre Fiction
  • Author:
    William Peter Blatty
  • ISBN:
    0765327139
  • ISBN13:
    978-0765327130
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Tor Books; First edition (February 1, 2011)
  • Pages:
    336 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Genre Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1499 kb
  • ePUB format
    1484 kb
  • DJVU format
    1776 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    406
  • Formats:
    mobi lrf doc rtf


The Exorcist is a 1971 horror novel by American writer William Peter Blatty.

The Exorcist is a 1971 horror novel by American writer William Peter Blatty. The book details the demonic possession of eleven-year-old Regan MacNeil, the daughter of a famous actress, and the two priests who attempt to exorcise the demon. Published by Harper & Row, the novel was the basis of a highly successful film adaption released two years later, whose screenplay was also written and produced by Blatty, and part of The Exorcist franchise.

An Academy Award winner for his screenplay for The Exorcist, Blatty is not only the author of one of the most terrifying novels ever written, but, paradoxically, also cowrote the screenplay for the hilarious Inspector Clouseau film, A Shot in the Dark.

The author, William Peter Blatty, was a graduate of Georgetown University and knew well the world of Jesuit priests. For my money, he did a marvelous job of delving into their humor, their disappointments, and their loneliness

The author, William Peter Blatty, was a graduate of Georgetown University and knew well the world of Jesuit priests. For my money, he did a marvelous job of delving into their humor, their disappointments, and their loneliness. And when he takes a tortured soul like Damien Karras, a priest who is also a brilliant psychologist, and puts him in a room with Satan, wel. et's just say things get really interesting.

William Peter Blatty. To my brothers and sisters, Maurice, Edward and Alyce, and in loving memory of my parents. Moreover, the house on Prospects Street does not exist, nor does the reception room of the Jesuit residence halls as I have described it.

Электронная книга "Legion: A Novel from the Author of The Exorcist", William Peter Blatty

Электронная книга "Legion: A Novel from the Author of The Exorcist", William Peter Blatty. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Legion: A Novel from the Author of The Exorcist" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Legion is a 1983 horror novel by American writer William Peter Blatty, a sequel to The Exorcist. It was adapted into the movie The Exorcist III in 1990, and is part of The Exorcist series. Like The Exorcist, it involves demonic possession. The book was the focus of a court case over its exclusion from The New York Times Best Seller list.

There’s no other explanation for some of the things the Communists did.

And as stepped ashore, there met him a man from the city who was possessed by demon. any times it had laid hold of him and he was bound with chain. ut he would break the bonds asunde. nd Jesus asked him, What is your name? And he answered, Legion. JAMES TORELLO: Jackson was hung up on that meat hook. There’s no other explanation for some of the things the Communists did. Like the priest who had eight nails driven into his skull.

Strangely William Peter Blatty took his last breath three days later. RIP for the author, he dished out some chilling stories

Just in time for the 40th anniversary of The Exorcist - Legion, a classic. Just in time for the 40th anniversary of The Exorcist - Legion, a classic tale of horror, is back in print! A young boy is found horribly murdered in a mock crucifixion. Strangely William Peter Blatty took his last breath three days later. RIP for the author, he dished out some chilling stories. We all remember the bizarre and relentless Lieutenant Kinderman from the original story.

William Peter Blatty, the author whose best-selling book The Exorcist  . William Peter Blatty was born on Jan. 7, 1928, in Manhattan to Peter and Mary Blatty, immigrants from Lebanon.

William Peter Blatty, the author whose best-selling book The Exorcist was both a milestone in horror fiction and a turning point in his own career, died on Thursday in Bethesda, Md. He was 89. The cause was multiple myeloma, his wife, Julie Blatty, said. In praising his 1963 novel, John Goldfarb, Please Come Home!, a Cold War spoof that Mr. Blatty later adapted for the screen, Martin Levin of The New York Times invoked the humorist S. J. Perelman, one of Mr. Blatty’s literary idols; Mr. Blatty, he said, writes like Perelman run amuck.

From the author of The Exorcist -- Legion, a classic tale of horror, is back in print!

A young boy is found horribly murdered in a mock crucifixion. Is the murderer the elderly woman who witnessed the crime? A neurologist who can no longer bear the pain life inflicts on its victims? A psychiatrist with a macabre sense of humor and a guilty secret? A mysterious mental patient, locked in silent isolation?

Lieutenant Kinderman follows a bewildering trail that links all these people, confronting a new enigma at every turn even as more murders surface. Why does each victim suffer the same dreadful mutilations? Why are two of the victims priests? Is there a connection between these crimes and another series of murders that took place twelve years ago―and supposedly ended with the death of the killer?

Legion is a novel of breathtaking energy and suspense. But more than this, it is an extraordinary journey into the uncharted depths of the human mind and the most agonizing questions of the human condition.

The answers are revealed in a climax so stunning that it could only have been written by the author of The Exorcist―William Peter Blatty.


Velellan
If you have a short attention span or a lack of patience, the ramblings and endless pontificating by Lt. William Kinderman in the first parts will probably get on your nerves fast, but if you’re a fan of William Peter Blatty and The Exorcist, you’ll stick with it because you know it’s going somewhere. I had the paperback once upon a time and never read it. I found a “gently-used” hardcover at a discount price on Amazon (my new hobby) and consumed it in only a few days. Oddly enough, William Peter Blatty passed away while I was in the middle of reading it.

Kinderman was a character who fascinated me in The Exorcist, so I thoroughly enjoyed this novel. He’s on the trail of a killer who’s supposed to be dead. Or is he? I won’t rehash the plot, since it’s difficult to do without giving spoilers. Let’s just say there may be a connection to the Reagan McNeil possession of the first novel and leave it at that.

This was also the basis of Exorcist III, a film I had never seen. I watched it immediately after finishing the book. As with The Exorcist, the novel is much better, without the interference of Hollywood, as you get with the movie. The character of Dr. Vincent Amfortas is integral to the story but never seen in the movie; Dr. Temple is more watered-down and less of a chauvinistic pig in the film, etc.

Unlike Exorcist III, Legion is less horror and more philosophical. It made me think about and question things, and I can only attribute that to a fine job by this author. May he rest in peace.
Rleyistr
This book, the sequel to "The Exorcist ", is not your typical horror story with blood and guts. It is more of a thinking person's horror story, or psychological horror at its best. Blatty is an excellent story teller and brings back a few characters from "The Exorcist " in this story of a series of gruesome murders that we soon learn is directly related to events surrounding the exorcism of a young girl that took place in the area several years prior. Just like the film version of this story, "The Exorcist III", this book has you questioning the mysteries of life, death, and the spiritual world. Blatty is in rare form here and truly keeps the writer captivated with his incredible ability to enrapture, entertain, and, yes, creep out.
Efmprof
The Exorcist Legion is not. That's probably the best way to start. While The Exorcist is linear and focused, Legion is trying to do more than it is capable of and it results in a fairly unfocused, mildly rambling read. Now, don't get me wrong, William Peter Blatty is a phenomenal writer but this is falls slightly short for me. Let's take the antagonist for example. In the Exorcist, it's very clear who is stirring up trouble. While its form and exact nature are not explicitly discussed right from the start, it's pretty clear what the McNeils are dealing with. In Legion, its more convoluted which could have made for a very frightening scenario but unfortunately the author chooses to only briefly illuminate its origins, its motivations, its methods about 75% of the way through and when he does - its compelling sure - but its too little too late. Instead Blatty chooses to devote more time than is necessary to the protagonist, and not the protagonists journey in the story, but just the protagonist pontificating on all manner of unnecessary thoughts. While I understand its a device to demonstrate the thoughtfulness of the story's main character, it comes off as rambling and does nothing to really advance the story. In the end, this was just too much of a slog through the main character's ruminations on life and the metaphysical and the supernatural and not enough horror. And for that, I can say it's ok but that I would not recommend this book. After the Exorcist, this book will do nothing but let you down.
Usishele
Legion is a sequel of sorts to William Peter Blatty's most famous novel, the Exorcist. It takes place ten years after the events that occur in the Exorcist and begins with a series of gruesome murders apparently perpetrated by a serial killer thought to have been killed ten years earlier. The protagonist is Bill Kinderman, an eccentric, brilliant police detective trying to reconcile the facts of this case while contemplating the paradox of human cruelty, suffering and evil in a world created by a loving God. At times exasperating in his constant, sometimes-inner, often spoken-out-loud monologue, Kinderman discovers that evil and good are opposite sides of the same coin and human suffering is the necessary result of the creator's decision to give birth to an imperfect world.
While I had expected a riveting horror/thriller, Legion gave me something entirely different, as the murders became essentially the backdrop to a discussion about the nature of man, God and his angels and demons.
Wizer
I re-read The Exorcist just before reading it's "sequel" Legion. It really is not a sequel by any means, but rather a book that shares characters with the former mentioned novel. This is a fantastic read with an eloquent writing style and deep philosophical discussions. The story is engrossing and captivating as is the main character. I disagree with what one reviewer intimated here; the philosophical digressions are in no way distractions and are in fact what makes this novel great. Mr. Blatty is a fantastic and unique writer whose wisdom and experience bleed through every page. This novel made me question long standing beliefs, things for which I thought I stood on firm ground. I truly and thoroughly enjoyed this read.
Welahza
It was good to go back and visit original characters from the Exorcist novel. But this book is long drawn out and not very dramatic. A few surprises await the reader. But it's nothing like the Exorcist at all

I read this because of the author and my liking of the Exorcist. But was left bored and filled by this book. Good luck