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by Francis Bacon
Download Essays fb2
Essays & Correspondence
  • Author:
    Francis Bacon
  • ISBN:
    1406892408
  • ISBN13:
    978-1406892406
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Echo Library (May 6, 2009)
  • Pages:
    108 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Essays & Correspondence
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1290 kb
  • ePUB format
    1868 kb
  • DJVU format
    1275 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    598
  • Formats:
    azw doc txt lit


Places of Perswasion and Disswasion. Seene and Allowed (1597) was the first published book by the philosopher, statesman and jurist Francis Bacon.

Places of Perswasion and Disswasion. The Essays are written in a wide range of styles, from the plain and unadorned to the epigrammatic. They cover topics drawn from both public and private life, and in each case the essays cover their topics systematically from a number of different angles, weighing one argument against another.

essays francis bacon cv3 librivox. I downloaded it expecting it to discuss his scientific theories. Instead it is what I would call a book full of advice about everything from gardening to politics. If you want to learn about Bacon's scientific theory read the Novum Organum.

Essays or Counsels Civil and Mora.

xcvii The Epistle Dedicatory. Essays or Counsels Civil and Mora.

Francis Bacon's Essays. To the Duke of Buckingham. Of Unity in Religions.

THE MODERN STUDENT'S LIBRARY. PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH AT INDIANA UNIVERSITY. THE ESSAYS OF FRANCIS BACON. THE MODERN STUDENT'S LIBRARY. This series is composed of such works as are conspicuous in the province of literature for their enduring influence. Every volume is recognized as essential to a liberal education and will tend to infuse a love for true literature and an appreciation of the qualities which cause it to endure.

In 'Essays', Francis Bacon focuses on a range of topics of a philosophical nature encompassing Truth, Death, Religion, Atheism, Travel, the Supernatural, Council, Envy, etc. On Council he says, 'the greatest trust between man and man is the trust of giving council'. Of Envy he speaks of envy being 'an affection to both facinate and bewitch' he goes on to speak of it 'coming easily to the eye especially upon the presence of the object'.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. These 58 essays are a literary legacy from English philosopher, lawyer, scientist, and statesman Francis Bacon

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. These 58 essays are a literary legacy from English philosopher, lawyer, scientist, and statesman Francis Bacon. Among the subjects explored are truth.

Essays of Francis Bacon (Essays, 1627, 123 pages). This title is not on Your Bookshelf. 0, 10 books on shelf). 0. Title and Dedication. 3. Of Unity in Religion.

Не удалось найти ни одного отзыва.

A collection of essays by the late 16th-century/early 17th-century English philosopher, statesman and scientist.

Rleyistr
Some books are to be tasted,” reads a famous passage, “others to be swallowed, and some to be chewed and digested”; all these groups forming, no doubt, an infinitesimal portion of theoceans and cataracts of ink in which the world is daily bathed and poisoned and drowned. Surely the Essays must be numbered among the few books that deserve to be chewed and digested. Rarely shall you find so much meat, so admirably dressed and flavored, in so small a dish. Bacon abhors padding, and disdains to waste a word; he offers us infinite riches in a little phrase; each of these essays gives in a page or two the distilled subtlety of a master mind on a major issue of life.
Diab
There is not much here to say that the other reviewers have not covered: Sir Francis was a truly sharp witted mind, and knew how to write good prose, and how to run his topics and resolutions home to the reader. As style goes, I personally go easily between Aristotle and Bacon in the same day, and often. To me I see much of Aristotle in Francis' works (as in his high-formal writing style), yet it seems he did not know Greek. Most of his quotations and analogies he draws from Latin writers (a large proportion seems to be Virgil and Tacitus; midst a handful of others strewn throughout).

As far as Sir Francis' writing goes, theres little bad to say, and a lot of good. This is worth reading for any philosopher, or even anyone trying to get a good hold of formal prose. He might to some seem a tad difficult to read at first, but it shouldn't prove a real obstacle for anyone actually interested in the reading -- after you read just a couple of his essays, you will likely start to get used to his style quickly. I suggest looking in the Contents and just picking out a few that look like topics you couldn't deny interest - that will get you hooked, and into the style.

As for the editor John Pitcher, there are many good things, but a certain terribly annoying quality that weighs as heavy as all the good in my opinion.
For those who do not know Latin extensively (i.e., limited vocabulary and grammar, or none at all) the annotations are of course great and indispensable. Pitcher also generously untangles Francis' allusions and such, which are helpful also at times.
But something that he (Pitcher) follows in other editors of Bacon's works, is complete asinine glossing of words in context which makes complete sense. And he does this extensively. Oftentimes in a work that actually does have an archaic vocabulary, the first glossing of the word is taken to carry its meaning through the essay, but though "estate" is used 10 times in the 2-3 page essay Pitcher will put a note at each occurrence and gloss "state" (not to mention in its context the glossing of that word is obvious and unnecessary). The amount of 'archaic' vocabulary is small and simple throughout the book; a half-page glossary could've been supplied instead of bogging the pages down with redundant annotations of obvious words and thus hurting the actually important annotations.
But all that said, this is still a great edition, a great book, great author, and even by the above facts this is probably the best publication of Francis' essays. The annoying glossing isn't too bad after you get used to it.
Spilberg
I first encountered Francis Bacon's "Essays" many, many years ago during college. My copy was a college library edition, so it did not remain a part of my permanent collection. However, some 25+ years later, I purchased the Penguin Classics edition to reread and reminisce about my school days, and I was not disappointed. Personally I found his essays fascinating, eloquent, philosophical, and brilliant. If I were in the same line of work I was in 15 years ago, I would study and memorize some of his quotes and use them in arguments with my colleagues and especially against my enemies.
Mettiarrb
Francis bacon doesn't waste a single word. He writes profoundly on topics and only in a few pages each. Great for when you want a thought provoking read but are pressed for time
Ericaz
Will Durant's - The Story of Philosophy - Chapter on Francis Bacon.

Bacons' finest literary product, the Essays (1597-1623), show him still torn between these two loves, for politics and for philosophy. In the "Essay of Honor and Reputation" he gives all the degrees of honor to political and military achieve-
ments, none to the literary or the philosophical. But in the essay "Of Truth" he writes : "The inquiry of truth, which is
the love-making or wooing of it; the knowledge of truth, which is the praise of it ; and the belief of truth, which is the
enjoying of it, is the sovereign good of human natures. In books "we converse with the wise, as in action with fools. That is, if we know how to select our books. "Some books are to be tasted," reads a famous passage (Essay #50), "others to be
swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested"; all these groups forming, no doubt, an infinitesimal portion of
the oceans and cataracts of ink in which the world is daily bathed and poisoned and drowned.

Surely the Essays must be numbered among the few books that deserve to be chewed and digested. Rarely shall you find so much meat, so admirably dressed and flavored, in so small a dish. Bacon abhors padding, and disdains to waste a word; he offers us infinite riches in a little phrase; each of these essays gives in a page or two the distilled subtlety of a master mind on a major issue of life. It is difficult to say whether the matter or the manner more excels; for here is language as supreme in prose as Shakespeare's is in verse.

Durants preference is for Essays 2, 7, 8, 11, 12, 16, 18, 20, 27, 29, 38, 39, 42, 46, 48, 50, 52, 54.

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Purchased this book Dec 2012. It was printed Sept 26, 2012 with 145 pgs. No introduction. No translations for the many Latin phrases. Used Google Translator for Latin phrases. Book is formatted so there is space to write notes on each page. After reading the Essays, one admires Bacon's concise eloquence.

link below is helpful for quick search on key words / phrases.

archive.org/stream/Story-Of-Philosophy/StoryOfPhilosophy_djvu.txt
sunrise bird
My copy had fallen apart from use. Glad to have a fresh copy of Bacon.
Samugor
Great window into the past...cryptic, insightful, philosophical, huge scope of History and philosophy, great handbook of what matters, chapters on any subject you would value.
Great read