» » Shooting an Elephant and Other Essays

Download Shooting an Elephant and Other Essays fb2

by George Orwell
Download Shooting an Elephant and Other Essays fb2
Essays & Correspondence
  • Author:
    George Orwell
  • ISBN:
    0151820430
  • ISBN13:
    978-0151820436
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Harcourt (July 1, 1984)
  • Pages:
    200 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Essays & Correspondence
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1292 kb
  • ePUB format
    1139 kb
  • DJVU format
    1481 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    161
  • Formats:
    lrf txt azw rtf


Contents: Shooting an Elephant, 1936. How the Poor Die, 1946. Books vs. Cigarettes, 1946. Good Bad Books, 1945. Nonsense Poetry, 1945.

Contents: Shooting an Elephant, 1936. Lear, Tolstoy and the Fool, 1947. Politics vs. Literature: An Examination of Gulliver's Travels, 1946. Reflections on Gandhi, 1949. The Prevention of Literature, 1946. Riding Down from Bangor, 1946.

Shooting an Elephant and Other Essays. Penguin modern classics. Shooting an Elephant. George Orwell (whose real name was Eric Arthur Blair) was born in 1903 in India and then went to Eton when his family moved back to England

Shooting an Elephant and Other Essays. with an Introduction by Jeremy Paxman. George Orwell (whose real name was Eric Arthur Blair) was born in 1903 in India and then went to Eton when his family moved back to England. From 1922 to 1927 he served with the Indian Imperial Police in Burma, an experience that inspired his first novel, Burmese Days (1934). He lived in Paris before returning to England, and Down and Out in Paris and London was published in 1936.

Shooting an Elephant" is an essay by English writer George Orwell, first published in the literary magazine New Writing in late 1936 and broadcast by the BBC Home Service on 12 October 1948. The essay describes the experience of the English narrator, possibly Orwell himself, called upon to shoot an aggressive elephant while working as a police officer in Burma.

Shooting an Elephant. Essay Early one morning the sub-inspector at a police station the other end of the town rang me up on the phone and said that an elephant was ravaging th. .

Also contains a biography and quotes by George Orwell. In Moulmein, in lower Burma, I was hated by large numbers of people-the only time in my life that I have been important enough for this to happen to me. I was sub-divisional police officer of the town, and in an aimless, petty kind of way anti-European feeling was very bitter. Early one morning the sub-inspector at a police station the other end of the town rang me up on the phone and said that an elephant was ravaging the bazaar. Would I please come and do something about it?

Selected essays reveal Orwell's satirical views on social and political issues. This collection of essays by George Orwell was published posthumously, after the publication of '1984' made him famous.

Selected essays reveal Orwell's satirical views on social and political issues. The title refers to an incident when as an Imperial Policeman in Burma he had to kill a tame elephant that went wild. He describes the times, and his reluctance to kill a working elephant "a costly piece of machinery". But the people seemed to expect it - for safety, and a huge amount of meat. The next essay tells of his participation in a hanging. He doesn't tell of the offense, only that he was "a puny wisp of a man".

Shooting an Elephant" is an essay by George Orwell, first published in the literary magazine New Writing in the .

Shooting an Elephant" is an essay by George Orwell, first published in the literary magazine New Writing in the autumn of 1936.

Shooting An Elephant Lyrics. George Orwell: A Life in Letters. About Shooting an Elephant and Other Essays. Shooting an Elephant and Other Essays Q&A.

part of Britain’s Indian Empire, in which he must shoot a wild elephant in th.

Shooting an Elephant – George Orwell English writer George Orwell is best known for his book Nineteen Eighty-Four, a dystopian novel about a future society controlled by a leader known as Big Brother. Students can probably hold their own on a game show or at a cocktail party if the above is all they know about George Orwell, but this particular essay recounts Orwell’s experience as a police officer in Burma, part of Britain’s Indian Empire, in which he must shoot a wild elephant in the town market, not to protect the people but.

Selected essays reveal Orwell's satirical views on social and political issues

Uylo
Haven't read all of it yet, but I'm sure it will be good, you can never go wrong with Orwell. The shipping was quick and the book came as stated.
Orll
Excellent writer. Enjoyed it very much.
Marad
:)
I love Mercedes
grandsons textbook for college
Utchanat
Good condition
Agrainel
For my student at school.
Gardagar
took a while to get here, when finally did it was only in an acceptable position and not good, the cover is different then what is seen in the picture.

other wise i think it's good
Shooting an Elephant

This collection of essays by George Orwell was published posthumously, after the publication of '1984' made him famous. The title refers to an incident when as an Imperial Policeman in Burma he had to kill a tame elephant that went wild. He describes the times, and his reluctance to kill a working elephant "a costly piece of machinery". But the people seemed to expect it - for safety, and a huge amount of meat.

The next essay tells of his participation in a hanging. He doesn't tell of the offense, only that he was "a puny wisp of a man". "How the Poor Die" tells of his hospitalization in 1929 Paris; he had a fever. He saw a doctor perform cupping on a patient! He was treated next, and then was given a mustard poultice. Orwell notes that a natural death means something slow, smelly, and painful. His prior experience was with people who died violent deaths. The public wards of hospitals often have horror, as if certain diseases only attacked lower income people. Later he learned this hospital had a bad reputation.

His "Thoughts on James Burnham" and the organization of society are still fresh and relevant after 50+ years, but outdated in parts. He pointed out that Burnham's prophecies are of "a continuation of the thing that is happening"; Orwell calls this cowardice and a worship of power. Orwell notes that a poll would have intelligent people guessing wrong, and less knowing people being right! He blames the worship of power for this. You can judge Orwell by this essay.

Orwell criticizes the claim "sports creates goodwill" by pointing to everyday experiences. Only local games played for fun and exercise create no fanaticism. Sport is frankly mimic warfare. It arouses the passion of the spectators to believe a kicked ball tests national virtue! But these actions merely illustrate the emotions hidden in everyday life.

In the "Decline of the English Murder" he points out that sex and money were involved in many famous murders. To get it or to keep it. This is the lesson of Criminology. Raymond Chandler's article "The Simple Art of Murder" criticized the fiction where murder is committed to provide a mystery to be solved.

"Reflections on Gandhi" gives Orwell's views. He notes that his prevention of violence served the British Empire. The Indian aristocracy and millionaires preferred him to Socialists and Communists. But nobody thought he was corrupt or ambitious. One fault was that he did not seek adequate personal protection in public! Gandhi treated all people with respect. Gandhi's personal philosophy was: no meat-eating, or any form of animal food. No alcohol, tobacco, spices or condiments; no sexual intercourse. No close friendships and no exclusive loves whatever. [I wonder what the point of all this was?] Satyagraha only seems feasible when a Ruling Class is inclined to grant your requests. It is useless against 19th century British (or other) imperialisms. Most people understand this if they can't articulate it. The concept of "passive resistance" is useful for a Ruling Class that does not want to lose their power, but may ameliorate the conditions of their subjects. Think about it.