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by Euripides
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Dramas & Plays
  • Author:
    Euripides
  • ISBN:
    1566631114
  • ISBN13:
    978-1566631112
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Ivan R. Dee (September 1, 1997)
  • Pages:
    69 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Dramas & Plays
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1890 kb
  • ePUB format
    1957 kb
  • DJVU format
    1589 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    787
  • Formats:
    docx lrf mobi doc


Series: Plays for Performance Series. Iphigenia in Aulis" was the last play written by Euripides and represents his most cynical depiction of the great heroes of Greek mythology.

Series: Plays for Performance Series. Publisher: Ivan R. Dee (September 1, 1997). Of course is will be ten long years before Agamemnon returns, to be murdered in his royal home by his wife Clytemnestra, who spent those long years of separation waiting for the day she could avenge her daughter's death.

Iphigenia in Aulis or at Aulis is the last of the extant works by the playwright Euripides. Written between 408, after Orestes, and 406 BC, the year of Euripides' death, the play was first produced the following year in a trilogy with The Bacchae and Alcmaeon in Corinth by his son or nephew, Euripides the Younger, and won the first place at the Athenian city Dionysia.

Euripides was a tragedian of classical Athens. Along with Aeschylus and Sophocles, he is one of the three ancient Greek tragedians for whom a significant number of plays have survived. Some ancient scholars attributed 95 plays to him but, according to the Suda, it was 92 at most. Of these, 18 or 19 have survived more or less complete (there has been debate about his authorship of Rhesus, largely on stylistic grounds) and there are also fragments, some substantial, of most of the other plays

Iphigenia in Aulis is the last extant work of the playwright Euripides. He sends a message to his wife, Clytemnestra, telling her to send Iphigenia to Aulis on the pretext that the girl is to be married to the Greek warrior Achilles before he sets off to fight.

Iphigenia in Aulis is the last extant work of the playwright Euripides. The Greek fleet is waiting at Aulis, Boeotia, with its ships ready to sail for Troy, but it is unable to depart due to a strange lack of wind.

The story of Iphigenia at Aulis would be the background story of Aeschylus' Agamemnon. The play starts with Agamemnon changing his mind. He sends another message to his wife to stop her from sending Iphigenia. The play takes place at Aulis where the Greek army is ready to sail for Troy and start the war. The goddess Artemis, however, has made so that there are no winds for sail since Agamemnon, a Greek general, has caused her offense. The message, however, is intercepted by Menelaus, his brother, who gets upset at his brother.

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LibriVox recording of Iphigenia in Aulis (Way translation) by Euripides

LibriVox recording of Iphigenia in Aulis (Way translation) by Euripides. The play revolves around Agamemnon, the leader of the Greek coalition before and during the Trojan War, and his decision to sacrifice his daughter, Iphigenia, to appease the goddess Artemis and allow his troops to set sail to preserve their honour in battle against Troy. The conflict between Agamemnon and Achilles over the fate of the young woman presages a similar conflict between the two at the beginning of the Iliad.

Iphigenia at Aulis  was Euripides‘ last play, written just before his death . Compared to Euripides‘ earlier treatment of the Iphigenia legend in the rather lightweight Iphigenia in Tauris , this later play is much darker in nature.

Iphigenia at Aulis  was Euripides‘ last play, written just before his death, but it only premiered posthumously as part of a tetralogy that also included his Bacchae  at the City Dionysia festival of 405 BCE. The play was directed by Euripides‘ son or nephew, Euripides the Younger, who was also a playwright, and won first prize at the contest (ironically a prize that had eluded Euripides all his life). However, it is one of the few Greek plays which shows Agamemnon in anything other than a negative light.

Iphigenia in Aulis book. This play premiered in Athens in 405BC and is about an incident that took place at Aulis before the the armies of Hellas could set sail for the Trojan War. This isn't a tragedy as we would normally think of them, as in Shakespeare's tragedies where bodies litter the stage by the final scene but it is a tragedy nonetheless despite the apparent 'happy' ending.

Agamemnon's sacrifice of his daughter in order to ensure the good fortune of his forces in the Trojan War is, despite its heroic background, in many respects a domestic tragedy. Plays for Performance Series.

Rit
Readable translation, unnecessary UI issues. For example: In-line text notes should link but do not. Even the freeware Greek tragedies have that feature enabled; certainly a paid version should as well.
Manesenci
The Kindle version is NOT the W S Merwin translation, even though Amazon's description claims that it is. Don't buy this version, which is a clunky stilted translation which will put you off reading the Greek plays. Go ahead and get a used copy of the WS Merwin translation, which is entitled "Iphigeneia at Aulis".
Vizil
"Iphigenia in Aulis" was the last play written by Euripides and represents his most cynical depiction of the great heroes of Greek mythology. The subject of the play is the sacrifice of Iphigenia, ordered by her father King Agamemnon, to appease the goddess Artemis, so that the Achaen fleet can have fair winds to sail to Troy and bring back Helen. Of course is will be ten long years before Agamemnon returns, to be murdered in his royal home by his wife Clytemnestra, who spent those long years of separation waiting for the day she could avenge her daughter's death.
I have used "Iphigenia in Aulis" as part of large unit on the Trojan War right before proceeding on to Homer's epic poem the "Iliad." Not only does the play come at that point in terms of the chronology of the war, but it clearly foreshadows the initial confrontation in the "Iliad" between Agamemnon and Achilles over Briseis of the lovely arms. To get his daughter to come to Aulis and be executed, Agamemnon says she is to marry Achilles. This lie not only makes Achilles angry when he learns about it, but the prospect of her daughter's marriage brings Clytemnestra to Aulis as well and foreshadows the tragedy "Agamemnon" by Aeschylus, the first part of the famed Orestia, as well.
But it is the contrast with Homer's epic that is most manifest here. Euripides invests the beginning of Homer's saga with painful irony as Agamemnon rejects the pleas of Briseis's father; after all, has the Achean leader really forgotten the pain of sacrificing his daughter ten years earlier? In Euripides's play it becomes clear that Agamemnon does not care for his daughter; she is but a bargaining chip in his ploy for power. As her father and ruler Agamemnon could simply order his daughter to come to Aulis, but instead he concocts a fake marriage to Achilles, the most eligible of the young Achean heroes. When Achilles finds out he has been a pawn in this deadly little game he is incensed and promises to safe the maiden, but in the end he turns out to be as foolish and as wicked as the rest of the characters. All of the sympathy goes towards Iphigenia, the only true hero in the drama since she alone acts selflessly. For the greater glory of the Achean host she will accept her fate and thus be fondly remembered.
Any one teaching the "Iliad" should at least provide the gist of "Iphigenia at Aulis" as background material, along with the story of the judgment of Paris. The same would apply to the study of either the entire "Orestia" or just the first play in the trilogy, "Agamemnon." As for the "true" fate of Iphigenia as realized by Euripides in "Iphigenia at Taurus," which is certainly the least tragic of his tragedies, that can be briefly mentioned as well to bring the whole grand tale to a happy ending of sorts.
Jaiarton
When you think of Greek tragedy and Euripides what immediately springs to mind? A desperately dry philosophical volume? Believe me, that is not the case with Ipheginia at Aulis. This beautifully crafted volume tells of the conflict between political and familial responsibility with a smattering of divine intervention. The beautiful Helen has be kidnapped by Paris and taken back to Troy. Helen's husband, Menalaus,brother to King Agamemnon of Mycenae persuades his brother to send the largest ever Greek fleet to take the land of Troy and retieve Helen. As the fleet is ready to sail from Aulis, the winds die and they are stranded. Unless, as the evil and manipulative prophet Calchas says, a sacrafice of a certain sixteen year old virgin princess is made then they will be permenantly beached. Here follow many twists and turns and a ride through the Ancient Greek mythical world with the fate of a whole nation at stake. How will Agamemnon fight his conscience and persuade his wife Clytemnestra to bring his beloved daughter to meet her death? To what depths will he stoop to to follow the quest for glory? Whatever the outcome, this is a beautiful play which lends itself to performance at any level- sure to bring any audience to their feet!