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by John Willett,Ralph Manheim,Norman Roessler,Bertolt Brecht
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Dramas & Plays
  • Author:
    John Willett,Ralph Manheim,Norman Roessler,Bertolt Brecht
  • ISBN:
    0143105388
  • ISBN13:
    978-0143105381
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Penguin Classics; Reprint edition (May 27, 2008)
  • Pages:
    304 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Dramas & Plays
  • Language:
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    4.9
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    623
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Bertolt Brecht reflects on the strength - and weakness - of the human spirit in the face of these difficulties. Any play about Galileo is bound to be a play about Free Speech. Brecht's play is also about the responsibility of scientists - or the irresponsibility perhaps.

Bertolt Brecht reflects on the strength - and weakness - of the human spirit in the face of these difficulties. His prose is easy to read and the science discussed is understandable to those with little to no science background. It seems clear that Brecht understood that Galileo's persecutors were right, that new knowledge is inherently dangerous to old accomodations of society, that astronomy and Christian beliefs are incompatible.

Bertolt Brecht (1898-1956) is acknowledged as one of the great dramatists whose work has had a considerable influence on the theatre. His landmark plays include The Threepenny Opera, Life of Galileo, and The Caucasian Chalk Circle

Bertolt Brecht (1898-1956) is acknowledged as one of the great dramatists whose work has had a considerable influence on the theatre. His landmark plays include The Threepenny Opera, Life of Galileo, and The Caucasian Chalk Circle. His plays and dramatic theory are central to the study of modern theatre.

ISBN-13: 978-0413685605.

In the Life of Galileo, Bertolt Brecht highlights the astronomer’s struggles with the Catholic Church, which opposed his work extending the theories of Copernicus and threatened him with torture. This was not an idle threat since the Church actually burned at the stake the heliocentric astronomer Giordano Bruno in 1600

Items related to Life of Galileo (Penguin Classics).

Items related to Life of Galileo (Penguin Classics). Brecht, Bertolt Life of Galileo (Penguin Classics). ISBN 13: 9780143105381. Life of Galileo (Penguin Classics). Published by Penguin Classics (2008). ISBN 10: 0143105388 ISBN 13: 9780143105381.

Bertolt Brecht (1898-1956) is acknowledged as one of the great dramatists whose work has had a considerable . His landmark plays include Mother Courage and Her Children, The Threepenny Opera, Life of Galileo, and The Caucasian Chalk Circle. Библиографические данные. Life Of Galileo Modern Classics. Перевод: John Willett. John Willett, Ralph Manheim. Bloomsbury Publishing, 2015.

Ralph Manheim (Translator, Introduction). Norman Roessler (Introduction). Bertolt Brecht: Leben des Galilei (Paperback). ISBN: 0143105388 (ISBN13: 9780143105381). Published 2002 by Bange. Königs Erläuterungen und Materialien, Paperback, 107 pages.

In 1996, Penguin Books published as a paperback A Complete Annotated Listing of Penguin Classics and Twentieth-Century Classics. The Good Person of Szechwan by Bertolt Brecht. Life of Galileo by Bertolt Brecht. The Life of Henri Brulard by Stendhal

In 1996, Penguin Books published as a paperback A Complete Annotated Listing of Penguin Classics and Twentieth-Century Classics. The Good Soldier by Ford Madox Ford. The Good Soldier Svejk and His Fortunes in the World War by Jaroslav Hašek. The Life of Henri Brulard by Stendhal. The Life of Milarepa by Tsangnyön Heruka.

Bertolt Brecht, John Willett, Ralph Manheim. Along with Mother Courage, the character of Galileo is one of Brecht's greatest creations, immensely live, human and complex. Unable to resist his appetite for scientific investigation, Galileo's heretical discoveries about the solar system bring him to the attention of the Inquisition. He is scared into publicly abjuring his theories but, despite his self-contempt, goes on working in private, eventually helping to smuggle his writings out of the country. As an examination of the problems that face not only the scientist but also the whole.

Out of Stock Sorry, this item is currently out of stock. In "Life of Galileo," the great Renaissance scientist is in a brutal struggle for freedom from authoritarian dogma. Unable to satisfy his appetite for scientific investigation, he comes into conflict with the Inquisition and must publicly renounce his theories, though in private he goes on working on his revolutionary ideas. Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group.

Galileo ranks alongside Mother Courage and Mr. Puntila as one of Brecht's most intensely alive, human, and complex characters. In Life of Galileo, the great Renaissance scientist is in a brutal struggle for freedom from authoritarian dogma. Unable to satisfy his appetite for scientific investigation, he comes into conflict with the Inquisition and must publicly renounce his theories, though in private he goes on working on his revolutionary ideas.For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

Aver
"Life of Galileo" explores the difficulty of upturning dogmas that have in place for years - the ongoing battle between science and religion that hasn't ended even now, 400 years later (as Bill Nye would attest to with his recent novel Undeniable). Bertolt Brecht reflects on the strength - and weakness - of the human spirit in the face of these difficulties. His prose is easy to read and the science discussed is understandable to those with little to no science background. The play (according to some background research I did after reading it) stays relatively close to the truth of Galileo's life, in everything except his daughter Virginia.

Overall, a great read considering its implications today.
Daiktilar
The "Life of Galileo" made an excellent dramatic presentation for my AP Modern Euro History course to read. I would only advise that students take several roles (but be careful their multiple personas don't appear together in the same scene) because of the large cast of characters and that a teacher select only certain scenes from the play due to its length. The scenes with Cardinal Barberini make especially good read-aloud dramatizations.
Westened
great
Purebinder
I bought the wrong book. But the play is entertaining once you accept the fictional dialogue.
Samuhn
It's always refreshing to see an artist who does the hard work necessary to get the science right. Brecht does not give us a hagiography or a hatchet job on Galileo; he is more interested in the truth. Unfortunately, this would probably be difficult to present for an American audience, because it has not been dumbed down to short sentences and sound bites. Which makes it that much better, in my book.
Xlisiahal
The plot, though fictionalized, resembles the basic outline of Galileo's life - Galileo used a new invention, the telescope, to empirically validate the Copernican model of the solar system. The universe doesn't actually revolve around the Earth, the Earth is just another planet that revolves around the Sun. Members of the clericy object to this. Some don't accept it since it contradicts their reading of the bible, others accept it but don't want the people to know because it will undermine their understanding of the world.

If the basic structure of the universe isn't they way they've been told, what else might be different? Could people live differently? Is the rule of the Church, Kings, not divinely ruled either? These are just a couple of the conundrums the play gives you to think about and always with both sides making very strong cases.

It sounds a little didactic put this way but it's an entertaining play. Galileo is portrayed as an Earthy character. He likes good food and being able to do as he pleases.

Aside from Galileo the other characters are also very well drawn, his daughter Virginia, his pupil Andrea, Cosimo De Medici, Cardinal Barberini.

All in all it's a interesting read with a lot of food for thought. Brecht gives you both drama and ideas and he does so quite suavely. Highly recommended.
Gajurus
So it seems with Brecht's "Life of Galileo", a thoroughly fictionalized portrayal of events in the 1600s that sounds, in the English translation, like a TV dramatization from the 1950s. But the translation is fair to the original, which sounds like German of the 1930s. I have trouble imagining how this play could be staged. If it were in early Baroque costumes, the language would sound utterly anachronistic. Perhaps modern dress would work better - a setting in Somerville, moving to Cambridge, and then to Deerfield, all in Massachusetts with appropriate Bay State accents. Brecht's political/philosophical message in this play may also seem dated, but I don't intend to explicate it here.

Yes, I am aware of Brecht's celebrated "Verfremdungseffekt" and I'm willing to concede that the anachronistic nature of this play is intended. But there are some catches. Brecht himself worked on the English version which was staged by the actor Charles Laughton as a 'realistic' drama. The alienation-effect couldn't have been prominent in that production. This is a richly annotated and comparative edition in English, with two complete versions of the play and with ample notes, including comments by Brecht that disclaim the tragic nature of Galileo's recantation and house-imprisonment.

Any play about Galileo is bound to be a play about Free Speech. Brecht's play is also about the responsibility of scientists - or the irresponsibility perhaps. It seems clear that Brecht understood that Galileo's persecutors were right, that new knowledge is inherently dangerous to old accomodations of society, that astronomy and Christian beliefs are incompatible. My 17th C avatar, Giordano Bruno, doesn't strut the boards in this drama, but his execution by the Roman Inquisition is a frequent topic. Bruno was possibly the first human to grasp infinity, to understand that an infinite universe can't have begun and can't end. Even Galileo, the real man with his telescope, fell short of Bruno's intuition. The core of Brecht's play is the battle-to-the-death between comforts of established religious customs and the potential of a future without religion.

If I were a stage director or a dramaturge, I'd take huge liberties with this play. I'd switch "heroes" from Galileo to Charles Darwin, with a contrafactual persecution of Darwin by an American HUAC. Brecht would understand; anything that forces an audience to react is good drama.
The Life of Galileo by Bertolt Brecht is entertaining, educational and intelligent.