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by Václav Havel
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Dramas & Plays
  • Author:
    Václav Havel
  • ISBN:
    0394555546
  • ISBN13:
    978-0394555546
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Grove Press; 1st edition (1987)
  • Pages:
    56 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Dramas & Plays
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1482 kb
  • ePUB format
    1840 kb
  • DJVU format
    1429 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    270
  • Formats:
    lit txt mbr lrf


Translation of: Largo desolato.

New York : Grove Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Translation of: Largo desolato. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on November 5, 2013. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Start by marking Largo Desolato: A Play in Seven Scenes as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

A biting drama by the famed playwright and statesman at his creative. Start by marking Largo Desolato: A Play in Seven Scenes as Want to Read: Want to Read savin.

Largo Desolato is a l play by Václav Havel about a political dissident, Leopold Nettles (originally in Czech Kopřiva), who fears being sent to prison for his writing. Leopold faces mounting pressure from his friends, admirers and colleagues; these pressures in addition to ongoing state surveillance have made him incapable of writing anything further.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Largo Desolato: A Play in Seven Scenes by. .Vaclav Havel has created a vivid and terrifying portrait of the writer in the totalitarian state that is as real and immediate as today's headlines.

Vaclav Havel has created a vivid and terrifying portrait of the writer in the totalitarian state that is as real and immediate as today's headlines. See all 2 brand new listings.

Gathered together here for the first time are seven plays that span Havel's career from his early days at the Theater of the Balustrade through the Prague Spring, Charter 77, and the repeated imprisonments that made Havel's name into a rallying cry and pr. Disturbing the Peace: A Conversation with Karel Hvížďala. In a book written while he was president of Czechoslovakia, Vaclav Havel combines the same powerful eloquence, moral passion, and abiding wisdom that informed his writing as a dissident and playwright, with a candor unprecedented from one with the broad p. Temptation. by Václav Havel · Marie Winn.

oceedings{Havel1987LargoDA, title {Largo Desolato: A Play in Seven Scenes}, author {V{'a}clav Havel}, year {1987} }. Václav Havel.

a play in seven scenes. by Václav Havel, Václav Havel. Published by Grove Press in New York.

Vaclav Havel, Tom Stoppard. Professor Leopold Nettles, the hero of Largo Desolato, is the author of a book that contains a troublesome paragraph laying him open to arrest on charges of disturbing the intellectual peace

Vaclav Havel, Tom Stoppard. Professor Leopold Nettles, the hero of Largo Desolato, is the author of a book that contains a troublesome paragraph laying him open to arrest on charges of disturbing the intellectual peace. Pressed by the government to recant, Nettles is tortured by internal demons as well as external ones. Vaclav Havel has created a vivid and terrifying portrait of the writer in the totalitarian state that is as real and immediate as today s headlines.

When Professor Leopold Nettles writes a book that contains passages unacceptable to the government he faces pressures from the state.

In Phoenix, conviction means a fine. In Havel's play, a conviction may mean an indeterminate sentence in semi-starved misery in a distant gulag. Once suspected, Leopold knows he's guilty in the eyes of the state.

Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). In Phoenix, conviction means a fine. The play portrays a variety of people who visit him, proud that he speaks up in defiance of the authorities - - - but unwilling to join him in his stand for intellectual freedom. Leopold, like Havel for much of his life, is utterly alone. But who are the well-wishers who applaud his dissidence?


Nothing personal
THE BOOK GOOD, BUT AS FAR AS GETTING IT DELIVERED, THAT IS A DIFFERENT STORY!!! IF YOU
DONT CARE HOW LONG IT TAKES TO GET, ORDER...IF YOU NEED WITHIN A WEEK OR TWO, GO ELSEWHERE
BECAUSE I WILL.
Madis
All life in a police state is interesting, probably corrupt and potentially subversive as portrayed in this absurdist but seemingly autobiographical play by Czech playwright Vaclav Havel.

As in Phoenix, to cite an example, police don't care about guilt, innocence, justice or mercy. If anyone is accused of a crime, they want a conviction. In Havel's play, Professor Leopold Nettles is charged with "disturbing the intellectual peace."

Only in a police state could anyone invent such a wide-ranging crime. In Phoenix, conviction means a fine. In Havel's play, a conviction may mean an indeterminate sentence in semi-starved misery in a distant gulag. Once suspected, Leopold knows he's guilty in the eyes of the state. The play portrays a variety of people who visit him, proud that he speaks up in defiance of the authorities - - - but unwilling to join him in his stand for intellectual freedom.

Leopold, like Havel for much of his life, is utterly alone.

But who are the well-wishers who applaud his dissidence? Are they friends, or secret police agents as provocateurs? Two police agents who visit offer a clever means to avoid prosecution; in effect, "just agree to our falsehoods and all charges will go away." Really? A trap? Are the police undermining the government they serve? How can anyone trust anything?

Such is the nature of 'Largo Desolato' and life in a police state. Anything said, done or suspected can be used in a secret hearing. Anyone can be an informant; as seen when the Stasi files were opened. Survival means never having an original thought, never a question, never a doubt about the regime, and never a friend. Even silence may be suspicious. No one, nothing, can be trusted. Freedom is imprisoned in one's mind more rigorously than a body in any dungeon.

A police state turns a even a soft knock on the door into a thunder of fear, doubt, suspicion and mistrust. Havel expresses it well, because Havel lived it and writes of that which he knows. This is a beautiful play about a frightening reality.
Cobandis
This absurd play is both funny and tragic at the same time. Professor Leopold Nettles is about to be arrested for an article he wrote, and no one connected with him seems to be overly concerned. Instead, everyone he knows, and some absolute strangers, keep busy trying to make him into what they want. At one point he is given the opportunity to deny that he was the author of the article, which leads to some fascinating thoughts on the questions of identity, self-worth, and integrity. The play causes the reader to reflect on his or her beliefs about these things; it also serves as good insight into life under a communist regime.