» » The Front Page: A Play in Three Acts

Download The Front Page: A Play in Three Acts fb2

by Charles MacArthur,Ben Hecht
Download The Front Page: A Play in Three Acts fb2
Dramas & Plays
  • Author:
    Charles MacArthur,Ben Hecht
  • ISBN:
    0573609128
  • ISBN13:
    978-0573609121
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Samuel French, Inc.; Later Printing Used edition (September 27, 2010)
  • Pages:
    143 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Dramas & Plays
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1888 kb
  • ePUB format
    1365 kb
  • DJVU format
    1859 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    250
  • Formats:
    lrf doc txt docx


Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur had been reporters in Chicago so when they moved to New York to write a play, they drew on their Chicago experience. The play was an instant hit. It went on to the movies, appearing three times in different clothing.

Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur had been reporters in Chicago so when they moved to New York to write a play, they drew on their Chicago experience. In the second version, His Girl Friday, reporter Hildy Johnson became a woman instead of a man, which is what she is tonight in the Prospect production. Why do we find irresistible a play written so long ago? What’s the attraction?

Ben Hecht (1894-1964) was an American screenwriter, director, producer, playwright, and novelist

Ben Hecht (1894-1964) was an American screenwriter, director, producer, playwright, and novelist. Библиографические данные. The Front Page: A Play in Three Acts.

MacArthur is best known for his plays in collaboration with Ben Hecht, Ladies and Gentlemen (filmed as Perfect Strangers), Twentieth Century and the frequently filmed The Front Page, which was based in part on MacArthur's.

MacArthur is best known for his plays in collaboration with Ben Hecht, Ladies and Gentlemen (filmed as Perfect Strangers), Twentieth Century and the frequently filmed The Front Page, which was based in part on MacArthur's experiences at the City News Bureau of Chicago. MacArthur also co-wrote, with Edward Sheldon, the play Lulu Belle, which was staged in 1926 by David Belasco. MacArthur was friends with members of the Algonquin Round Table.

The Front Page is a Broadway comedy about tabloid newspaper reporters on the police beat. Written by former Chicago reporters Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur, it was first produced in 1928 and has been adapted for the cinema several times. The play's single set is the dingy press room of Chicago's Criminal Courts Building, overlooking the gallows behind the Cook County Jail

Comedy, Characters: 17 males, 5 females Set Requirements: InteriorAn irresistible comedy with thrills and derring do set in the news room

Select Format: Paperback. Comedy, Characters: 17 males, 5 females Set Requirements: InteriorAn irresistible comedy with thrills and derring do set in the news room. Hildy wants to break away from journalism and go on a belated honeymoon. There is a jailbreak and into Hildy's hands falls the escapee as hostage.

THE FRONT PAGE, a play in three acts, by Ben Hecht and Charies MacArthur. Staged by George S. Kaufman; settings by Raymond Sovey; produced by Jed Harris. At the Times Square Theatre. View Full Article in Timesmachine . Advertisement. Go to Home Page . news.

Other articles where The Front Page is discussed: The Front Page. as adapted from a hit play of the same name by Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur, with much of their witty . MacArthur and Hecht also achieved.

Menjou, who often played high-class debonair characters, was honoured with an Academy Award nomination (one of three the film received) for his against-type performance.

Ben Hecht, Charles MacArthur. A Play in Three Acts. Published January 1998 by Samuel French Inc Plays There's no description for this book yet. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove The Front Page from your list? The Front Page. Published January 1998 by Samuel French Inc Plays. Drama, Newspaper publishing, Journalists, Internet Archive Wishlist. Ben Hecht (1893-1964).

The Front Page: A Play in Three Acts. A few years ago, I watched His Girl Friday, the 1940 adaptation of this 1924 play. I enjoyed the movie, so I was looking forward to reading this play. 0573609128 (ISBN13: 9780573609121). This one’s a bit too dated for me. When judging a story, I generally try and consider the time in which a piece was written, but I couldn’t get over the casual racism and sexism in this one. Plus, Hildy Johnson is a much more interesting character as a woman (as she is in His Girl Friday). He’s kind of a jerk in the original play. I rewatch A few years ago, I watched His Girl Friday, the 1940 adaptation of this 1924 play.

Charles Macarthur, American author, playwright. Johnny on a spot: A comedy in three acts

Charles Macarthur, American author, playwright. Johnny on a spot: A comedy in three acts. 11114/?tag prabook0b-20. Rasputin And The Empress. MacArthur is best known for his plays in collaboration with Ben Hecht, Ladies and Gentlemen (filmed as Perfect Strangers), Twentieth Century and the frequently filmed The Front Page, which was based in part on MacArthur"s experiences at the City News Bureau of Chicago. MacArthur also co-wrote, with Edward Sheldon, a play called Lulu Belle, which was successfully staged in 1926 by David Belasco.

Comedy / Characters: 17 males, 5 females

Set Requirements: Interior

An irresistible comedy with thrills and derring do set in the news room. Hildy wants to break away from journalism and go on a belated honeymoon. There is a jailbreak and into Hildy's hands falls the escapee as hostage. He conceals his prize in a rolltop desk and phones his scoop to his managing editor. Their job is to prevent other reporters and the sheriff from opening the desk and finding their story. Some hoods are enlisted to remove the desk, but they get mixed up with a Boy Scout troop and the mayor and a cleaning woman, among others. It's a whirlwind wrap up with Hildy finally making his breakaway, but the cynical managing editor has him arrested before he leaves town for having stolen a watch he planted on Hildy.

"Gorgeously melodramatic. One of the funniest and most exciting of American plays." N.Y. Times.

"Fast, explosive, funny." ABC TV.


crazy mashine
Remakes can be hit or miss. The Front Page has been done a few times as a film, including the classic screwball comedy "His Girl Friday". Based on a perennial hit play, this version stars the classic team of Jack Lemmon & Walter Matthau. Plenty of good support actors as well. Period details are excellent, and the story is always moving. Definitely a great addition to any fan of classic comedy.
Ghile
Billy Wilder does farce. I liked the cinematography, but I found no humour in the film at all. Carol Burnett put in a magnetic performance, but the rest of the formidable talent, with Wilder at the head of the list, went to waste.
Tejar
If you like Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau then this Billy Wilder film will definitely entertain you. This comedy duo make many films together such as Grumpy Old Men and the Odd Couple and this movie doesn't disappoint either. Set back in the times when newspapers set the tone for everyday life with their "screaming" headlines much like that Nat'l Enquires of today the movie takes you on a trip thru that time. Laughs all the way along with Carol Burnett, Susan Sarandon and Vincent Gardenia making up the cast. This was another great film for one of the best comedic duos of their time.
Jusari
When there is a movie starring Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau, written by Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur and directed by Billy Wilder, well, my friend, you're in for out and out fun. Bring your laughter with you for this outrageous comedy of the newspaper biz that is set during the Roaring 20s Prohibition Era in Chicago. The 1974 movie also features Susan Sarandon in her first movie role, and Carol Burnett as the hilarious "lady of the night," Molly Malone. Allen Garfield is the hapless Earl, at the centre of the movie action and Vincent Gardenia as the none too bright sheriff. David Wayne is also featured as the effete reporter who is so fastidious as to have his own desk brought into the reporters' room in the courthouse - and his own toilet paper.

For all reporters and editors of modern times, this is a nostalgic look at the days when newspapers were powerful forms - if not the only forms - of getting the news to the public.

Walter Matthau as Walter Burns is editor of the most prominent newspaper in Chicago. Jack Lemmon as Hildy (short for Hildegarde) is his ace reporter who can write anything at anytime under any conditions.

The plot revolves around Hildy, who wants to leave to get married and doesn't want to report on the most important story of the day, the hanging of Earl, who allegedly belongs to some weird group or other, and his supposedly shooting of a policeman. It is an election year, and the mayor and the sheriff are making the most of the publicity. The reporters are gathered in a large room in city hall. Noises from the construction of a scaffold from whicch to hang Earl can be heard out in the courtyard of the jail across the way.

Walter Burns uses various tricks to foil Hildy's plans to leave Chicago that night with his fiancée to go to Philadelphia, where he will become an ad man in her father's firm. He's through with newspaper hours. He's sick of being a team with Walter Burns so busy that he never has a personal life.

One zany happening after another occurs and Earl gets free and goes in to hiding - in the reporters' room. This is where Carol Burnett's scene as lady of the night, Molly Malone, takes place. And I only wish this were sound so that I could duplicate the way she pronounces "E a r l." Only one syllable you say? Yes, and if you know Carol's work, you know the humour she can get out of one syllable.

Things progress most hilariously to their inevitable, zany conclusion. At the end, ready to leave with sweetheart on the train to Philadelphia, Walter tries one last trick to keep Hildy on the paper. Does it work? I'm not sayin'.

You'll have to buy it yourself to find out.

I read or heard somewhere at some time that one of the writers, Ben Hecht, worked as a newspaper reporter before leaving to become a Hollywood screen writer. Therefore, I like to believe that this is partially autobiographical.

But maybe not. After all, writers, like Walter Burns, all have their tricks.
Iaiastta
Excellent condition
Mr_Mole
It's 6 June 1929 - and Walter Burns is pouring Bromide from one glass into another. Nice guy Editor of the not-so-quality broadsheet The Chicago Examiner - Walter's stomach isn't churning from the 95 cent special he eat that morning - nor the constant Lucky Strike cigarette hanging out of his expletive worn dentures - nor from hearing dire poetry written by a snooty opposition reporter from The Tribune about his 'silver-haired mother'. It's from the way his city is going to execute Earl Williams the following morning at seven a.m. (a naïve socialist whose been hysterically blown up in the media as a Commie threat because he supposedly murdered someone). Chicago has the barefaced gall to hang the be-speckled puny sap - and Walter knows you can't get a decent headline from a hanging. "Now if only it was the electric chair..." Walter enthuses. "EARL WIILIAMS - FRIES! EARL WILLIAMS - ROASTED ALIVE!"

As you can imagine "The Front Page" is old-fashioned funny. Based on the 1928 play by Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur (itself filmed with Cary Grant as "His Girl Friday" in 1940) - the adapted screenplay by the legendary duo of Director Billy Wilder and Writer I.A.L. Diamond ("Some Like It Hot", "The Apartment" and "Avanti!") offers what you'd expect - rapid-fire dialogue that can only be described as comedic genius. Throw two of Wilder's favourite leading men into this hardboiled hijinx - Walter Matthau and Jack Lemmon - and magic will happen more often than not. But despite its commercial success - critics disliked this retro film - calling it wildly out of place in the harsh reality-filled movie landscape of 1974. But I've always loved it.

The story goes something like this. On the eve of the Earl Williams hanging - Walter Burns' best reporter Hildebrand 'Hildy' Johnson (Lemmon) waltzes into his office whistling a love song. He announces that he's quitting the 'racket' and is heading off to Philadelphia on the midnight train to marry his new fiancé Peggy Grant (an early role for Susan Sarandon) - a pianist who plays a sing-a-long version of "Take Good Care Of Yourself" on the organ at the Balaban and Katz Theatre. Her uncle is in advertising. Burns is unimpressed. "Jesus Hildy! You're a newspaperman! You're gonna write poetry about brassieres and laxatives!"

But then a stroke of luck sees Earl Williams (Austin Pendleton) escape during a bungled psychiatric examination (to see if he's sane enough to hang) with a loony Austrian shrink (Martin Gabel) and Sherriff "Honest Pete" Hartmann (a manic and entirely dishonest Vincent Gardenia). The luckless condemned man ends up in the Press Room of the Cook County Community Court House hiding out in a desk bureau with a bullet in his arm and innocence in his heart. A hooker (Carol Burnett) who befriended him and has a soft spot for the sap takes a dive into the courtyard to distract the press hacks ("Shady lady leaps for love!"). Walter comes over to the Court House to find Hildy hiding Williams there and the two plot a way to get him out of the building and pull off a major Chicago Examiner exclusive (remove Williams and the writing bureau by crane). There's even a reprieve from the Governor for Williams if only he can get it in time. And on it goes...

Much of the humour comes from a series of brilliant lowlife dialogue pieces - Walter calls the bungling Sheriff "Stooge of Stalin or Simply Stupid!" - when highbrow reporter Bensinger from The Tribune (an effeminate David Wayne) calls in to his re-write team - a gutter press hack whose playing poker for nickels nearby listens in on his conversation to nick his ideas (so you get the quality versus the gutter). Bensinger - "The city is preparing for a general uprising of radicals at this time. Sheriff Hartmann has placed extra guards around the jail, the municipal buildings and railroad stations..." Murphy's version - "The Sheriff has just put 200 more relatives on the payroll to protect the city from the Red Army who are leaving Moscow in a couple of minutes..." When Burns tries to fool Peggy Grant into believing Hildy is a sex pervert by turning up as Otto Fishbine his Parole Officer (he nicked a star from a film poster outside to pretend it's a official badge) - he says - "He's not really a criminal! He's just sick!"

Of course you have to single out the fabulous Walter Matthau - who is custom made for this kind of wiseass role. His Burns is devious, ruthless and gloriously tacky - "We need some last words Hildy...if necessary make them up yourself!"

I've had the US DVD of this film for years and the print was always only OK - and nothing better. Unfortunately this Universal BLU RAY released in Germany as "Extrablatt" (Barcode 4250124342807) clearly uses those same elements. There's lots of natural grain and only a bit of clarity improvement. The EXTRAS are few - Biogs on the big three (Lemmon, Matthau and Wilder) with rare but interesting publicity cards from the German release - but nothing else about the movie. There's a German/English language choice on the opening menu and trailers to other old releases - but that's it. Cheap and cheerful I'm afraid - and a damn shame no restoration has been done.

Director Billy Wilder has gone on record as saying that he shouldn't have made a remake and thought "The Front Page" wasn't his best work. But even by his lofty standards - 50% of Billy Wilder is still funnier than 100% of what today's gross-out clowns pass off as 'hilarious'.

When Hildy Johnson drops in to have a final drink with his Press Room buddies - Murphy (Charles Durning) gives him a whiskey toast with the title to this review. "May the wind at your back never be your own..." Now that's funny.

"The Front Page" may not be genius in 2014 - but it's a tabloid I'll soil my backside with any day of the week...

PS: see also my reviews for other Billy Wilder classics - the BLU RAY of "The Apartment" and the DVD of "Avanti!"
Kezan
This is a remake of the old black and white. Carol Burnette plays Molly Malloy, the prostitute with a heart of gold, and the antics of Lemmon and Matthau are hilarious. Great picture that is lots of fun, especially for a transplanted Chicagoan like me.
i bought this for a co-worker. she wanted it and so i got it for her on here and she gave me the money. sorry, crappy review, but i had to write something. she did say she loves this movie, tho. shes also about 65 years old. so maybe thatll help. but im 32 and 1 love these two actors.. so maybe it doesnt.