Download Homeplace fb2

by Anne Rivers Siddons
Download Homeplace fb2
Contemporary
  • Author:
    Anne Rivers Siddons
  • ISBN:
    0345354575
  • ISBN13:
    978-0345354570
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Ballantine Books; 1st edition (July 12, 1988)
  • Subcategory:
    Contemporary
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1340 kb
  • ePUB format
    1143 kb
  • DJVU format
    1841 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    497
  • Formats:
    lrf doc lit rtf


Anne Rivers Siddons (born Sybil Anne Rivers, January 9, 1936 – September 11, 2019) was an American novelist who wrote stories set in the southern United States.

Anne Rivers Siddons (born Sybil Anne Rivers, January 9, 1936 – September 11, 2019) was an American novelist who wrote stories set in the southern United States. The only child of Marvin and Katherine Rivers, she was born in Atlanta, Georgia, was raised in Fairburn, Georgia, and attended Auburn University, where she majored in illustration after initially studying architecture. She was named Loveliest of the Plains and was a member of the Delta Delta Delta sorority.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. After twenty-one years Micah (Mike) Winship is making the big move-she's going home for a visit. She hasn't been back since 1963.

writes with such astonishing lyrical beauty that you will want to read it aloud to everyone you ever loved. After twenty-one years Micah (Mike) Winship is making the big move-she's going home for a visit

writes with such astonishing lyrical beauty that you will want to read it aloud to everyone you ever loved. She hasn't been back since 1963, when her father threw her out, but now he is dying and asking for her. And although she is armed with her succesful journalism career and the strength found after her divorce, she is nearing forty and her sophisticated urban lifestyle is falling apart

Anne Rivers Siddons does a masterful job of layering description with actions and reactions around the twists and turns . I have read a lot of Anne Rivers Siddons, so I was excited to find a book I hadn't read.

Anne Rivers Siddons does a masterful job of layering description with actions and reactions around the twists and turns, while whetting the reader's appetite with a hint of romance. At the end, it was better not to be, as Mike had a lot of growing and recovery. It was really different from other ones I've read, and I found out why when I read that this was an early book. I was really frustrated with the main character for being dense and making really stupid life choices.

Anne Rivers Siddons ndard British public school. I thought we’d get you on our side sooner or later, but I figured you’d put up a bigger fuss than you did. You fell without a shot being fired. He had insisted on coming before work the morning after their visit to the homeplace to tell her about the action against the Department of Transportation

by. Siddons, Anne Rivers. 1st Ballantine Books ed. External-identifier.

by. urn:acs6:homeplace00sidd:pdf:908-38ad1223c6d7 urn:acs6:homeplace00sidd:epub:6cd-d631e97e52af urn:oclc:record:1035600886. ark:/13960/t6xw55z47. And although she is armed with her succesful journalism career and the strength found after her divorce, she is nearing forty and her sophisticated urban lifestyle is falling apart

After twenty-one years Micah (Mike) Winship is making the big move-she's going home for a visit. She hasn't been back since 1963, when her father threw her out

After twenty-one years Micah (Mike) Winship is making the big move-she's going home for a visit.

writes with such astonishing lyrical beauty that you will want to read it aloud to everyone you ever loved.

Micah (Mike) Winship was ordered out of her parents' home twenty years ago. But now her father is dying and asking for her. Tired of her New York life, she heads back down South, and is forced to confront a past that includes an older lover, an overindulged sister, and the surprising and inexplicable pull of a place called home....

Xanna
Homeplace is set in the fictional town of Lytton, Georgia, and hits on some very controversial subjects for Siddons. She goes back to the Civil Rights era where the main character Mike meets the wrath of her father when she skips school to attend a rally in Atlanta. This turning point in the novel becomes the pivoting event. Mike leaves home and attempts to find her way on her own, and she’s a successful journalist. But, as all things that are swept under carpets, the dust eventually rises and must be banished.

Siddons still has the remarkable ability to use language in a way that loses me in the writing. I find myself settling in with the characters despite much of the predictability of the story. As Mike begins her first foray into the center of the Civil Rights Movment in Mississippi, Siddons describes the surroundings many of the white young college students encountered.

“What they did encounter was a wet, relentless, juggernaut heat, a vast and feral army of mosquitoes, and empty, sleepy, one-gas-pump towns where they alit sitckily from the buses long after dark and trudge wearily into identical rural Negro shanties at the end of dirt roads in cotton fields and pasture, to sleep on pallets and quilts in the endless heat, wash at hand umps, use privies, and eat greens and grits and pork gravy for days on end.”

Whew—that’s all one sentence. Siddons dramatic flair in her prose creates the sense of the long and oppressive sense of the experience by the use of a long and almost oppressive sentence. But once the reader allows the words to wash over and around, the experience of reading Siddons becomes a journey into the world of the South. Sometimes a harsh place to be; sometimes a fake place to be; but sometimes a heavenly place to be.
I enjoyed the story for Siddons ability to create a sense of poetry in her fiction although I expect more from her in the plot she contrives in Homeplace. All the bad guys are easy to spot even when disguised with a fancy house. And all the confused folks are similar to other characters in her other novels. Perhaps this is the reason I took a hiatus from reading her books several years back.
Steep
I have enjoyed many of Ms Siddons''s books, and that is the only reason I finished it. I was unable to read it all, skimming the last half.
Mike, the heroine, is unbelievable. Such a mishmash of contradictory characteristics, zero understanding of herself or anyone else, while being a successful writer, pretending to have it together while betraying herself, everyone in her life. And all her principles. I came away feeling betrayed, too, feeling pity and disdain for her.
If I had it to do over, I would watch several hours of TV commercials.
Don't read it.
Fred Norman
ZloyGenii
Homeplace is my favorite ARS book so far. Unlike some of the other books that had strange endings, this one was reasonable and hopeful, not ridiculous, over the top, or reaching.

I also loved the start where Micah Winship "Mike" is shown as a lonely child who preferred the company of the servants than her own father. As the story unfolds, we find that Mike's father never accepted her because he blamed her for causing the death of his beloved wife in childbirth.

Mike is now an insecure and rather gullible woman. Her daughter resents her and her current lover tricks her and she's out of a job, wondering how she'd pay for her flat. A message comes from her sister asking her to spend the summer at home with her father who is dying of cancer.

What unfolds is an emotional journey where Mike tries desperately to numb her feelings inside a bell jar and absorb what has become of her home town, her shell of a father, and her aggressive and conniving sister and horrid brother-in-law.

Then there's the old flame, Bay, who had become a prominent politician with a drunk ex-cheerleader wife. While Micah suspects her father's new lawyer, Sam, of undue influence and shenanigans, she is instead doublecrossed by the one she unhesitately trusts.

While I foresaw some of the betrayals, it was still enjoyable to watch them unfold in slow motion. Anne Rivers Siddons does a masterful job of layering description with actions and reactions around the twists and turns, while whetting the reader's appetite with a hint of romance.

At the end, it was better not to be, as Mike had a lot of growing and recovery. But the book ends on a positive note, the villains are foiled, and Mike has the possibility of a better life as a complete woman, not the girl-child hidden under a veneer of numbness.
Thozius
Siddons depicts a strong woman Micah Winship whose life falls apart in a week. She has a panic attack on a train and flees to the refuge of a lover only to find he has recorded her intimate revelation to use in his next novel. Then her apartment goes from rental to condo her daughter defects to join her father, and a younger writer gets the assignment Micah had expected. When her sister demands that she return to Lyton, GA, to help care for their ailing father, she agrees only because she has nowhere else to run. Much of the story after that is predictaable. Siddons weaves in the social problems of small town Southern life with the sibling rivalry The once beautiful older sister Daisy is now the fat Deedee married to a slob and resentful of Micah's fame and success in the city. The bitter father who rejected Mike after her idealistic participation in a Civil Rights protest is now the nearly helpless stroke victim, even more bitter than she remembers him.
Siddons complicates the plot with the temptaion of Mike's first suitor Bayard Sewell, now married to an alcoholic while striving to become a gubernatorial nominee. The black who was arrested with Mike at the riot those years ago now lives in the garage apartment and tends the lawn despite his college degree.
Of course every romance needs a man who disgusts the heroine until she discovers his inner value. Though a bit formulaic, HOMEPLACE entertains by Siddons' characters and her depiction of the surroundings with richness of language and detail.