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by Surendranath Tagore,Anita Desai,Rabindranath Tagore
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Contemporary
  • Author:
    Surendranath Tagore,Anita Desai,Rabindranath Tagore
  • ISBN:
    0140181873
  • ISBN13:
    978-0140181876
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Penguin Classics (April 1, 1996)
  • Pages:
    208 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Contemporary
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1171 kb
  • ePUB format
    1153 kb
  • DJVU format
    1464 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    252
  • Formats:
    txt doc txt docx


Rabindranath Tagore (Author), Surendranath Tagore (Translator), Anita Desai (Introduction) & 0 more.

Rabindranath Tagore (Author), Surendranath Tagore (Translator), Anita Desai (Introduction) & 0 more.

Tanika Gupta updates Rabindranath Tagore's classic novel to a contemporary British Muslim context. If "Timelessness" defines whether a book is a classic or not, then "Ghare Baire" or "The Home and The World" is in true sense a great Classic. Nusrat arrives in the UK from Pakistan to marry Nabeel, a wealthy, progressive and educated businessman. Fearful of the wider society, Nusrat locks herself away in the house reading newspaper articles that only serve to heighten her concerns. Before this book, 'Chokher Bali' was the only other novel that I had read of Tagore, and can't say I was too impressed with it.

He has translated Tagore's short stories and his novel The Home of the World for Penguin Classics.

Anita Desai was born in 1937; her father was Bengali and her mother German, and she was educated in Delhi. Her publihsed work includes Clear Light of Day, which was shortlisted for the 1980 Booker Prize, Fire on the Mountain, for which she won the Royal Society of Literature's Winifred Holtby Memorial Prize and the 1978 National Academy of Letters Award, In Custody, which was shortlisted for the 1984 Booker Prize, a volume of short stories, Games at Twilight, and Baumgartner's. He has translated Tagore's short stories and his novel The Home of the World for Penguin Classics.

Rabindranath Tagore .

Set on a Bengali noble's estate in 1908, this is both a love story and a novel of political awakening. Her attempts to resolve the irreconciliable pressures of the home and world reflect the conflict in India itself, and the tragic outcome foreshadows the unrest that accompanied Partition in 1947. Tagore’s story is set in Bengal at the early part of the 20th century when the Swadeshi (self-sufficiency) movement was taking root, which had as its aim that people would use only domestic goods Читать весь отзыв.

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I NTRODUCTION Rabindranath Tagore’s novella The Home and the World (1915) belongs to the trilogy formed by The Wreck (1906) and Gora (1909)

I NTRODUCTION Rabindranath Tagore’s novella The Home and the World (1915) belongs to the trilogy formed by The Wreck (1906) and Gora (1909). It was Tagore himself who introduced the short story in Bengal from France in the second half of the nineteenth century. 1 This form of fiction, like the novella, was highly functional in the sense that it allowed the author to represent Bengal in an elliptical but focused manner that gained in strength and concentration. In so doing, the woman is made to cross the threshold between the world of the zenana, the private realm inhabited by women in traditional Indian families, and the world of politics, the public.

Imprint: Penguin Classics. Published: 31/03/2005. Surendranath Tagore (Translator). Imprint: Penguin Classics.

I think I can see you watching there in the balcony with your lamp lighted, where the end and the beginning of all things meet My world went hence through the doors that you opened- you. 2 January at 07:51 ·. +30. Gitanjali by Rabindranath Tagore is with Cristina Tabueña Antonio. 2 January at 00:51 ·. Rare Collection of Tagore.

Items related to Selected Short Stories (Penguin Twentieth Century Classics). Rabindranath Tagore Selected Short Stories (Penguin Twentieth Century Classics). ISBN 13: 9780140184259. Selected Short Stories (Penguin Twentieth Century Classics). ISBN 10: 0140184252 ISBN 13: 9780140184259. Publisher: Penguin Classics, 1991.

The Home and the World (in the original Bengali, ঘরে বাইরে Ghôre Baire or Ghare Baire, lit. "At home and outside") is a 1916 novel by Rabindranath Tagore. The book illustrates the battle Tagore had with himself, between the ideas of Western culture and revolution against the Western culture. These two ideas are portrayed in two of the main characters, Nikhilesh, who is rational and opposes violence, and Sandip, who will let nothing stand in his way from reaching his goals.

Set on a Bengali noble's estate in 1908, this is both a love story and a novel of political awakening. The central character, Bimala, is torn between the duties owed to her husband, Nikhil, and the demands made on her by the radical leader, Sandip. Her attempts to resolve the irreconciliable pressures of the home and world reflect the conflict in India itself, and the tragic outcome foreshadows the unrest that accompanied Partition in 1947.

Saberdragon
This is one of the most beautifully written books I know. The three first-person accounts allowed the author to set out so many gems of philosophical outlooks. Many times I would have to stop after each sentence to be sure that I had grasped the thought before moving on to the next, to be sure I had appreciated what was being said. Our book club members came with lists of favorite quotes that had to share with one another. And the picture of the ideas and movements for Indian independence that were developing even so far back as when this book was written was an eye-opener to me. A joy to read and to think back on.
BeatHoWin
A prolific Bengalese writer, Tagore structured this novel such that three main characters represent the turbulence of the Partition that was yet to come to India in 1947. Nikhil is married to Bimala, living in the traditional domestic manner; for herself, Bimala has no expectation of her life ever deviating from her wifely path. The concept of "Swadeshi", a renewed appreciation of everything Indian, and a denial of everything British, particularly British imported goods and grains, rages throughout the country. The egocentric Sandip, a guest in Nikhil's home, is a fierce proponant of Swadeshi. Sandip finds himself passionately attracted to Bimala; he idealizes her as the epitome of "Mother" India, and pursues Bimala without reservation. Flattered by Sandip's attention, Bimala begins to question the nature of her marriage, and the three embark upon an emotional journey that will forever alter their lives, just as India begins a lengthy period of upheaval and unrest. Of the three, Sandip is transparantly shallow, while Nikhil thoughtfully considers every aspect before embarking on a course of action. Both men indulge in lengthy discourses, but the introduction by Anita Desai does much to frame this novel in the appropriate perspective. The allegorical nature of this tale is evident as the characters plunge headlong into the future.
Kerahuginn
This book is largely a parable about the conflicts in Bengal in the early twentieth century. Tagore uses a triangle of husband and wife and outside suitor. Bimala, the wife is a sort of central figure as the novel largely revolves around her conflicting feelings towards both her husband Nikhil and Sandip. She feels excited by Sandip's passion but also has a bond with her husband. Nikhil is the reserved and dignified religious man who is not swayed by the mob mentality that was sweeping through the Bengal state. Sandip is the passionate, xenophobic leader pushing for the immediate gain. The narrative is written threefold. All three characters take turns telling the story from their own point of view. This is an interesting effect that adds dimension to the tale. Tagore obviously feels empathy towards Nikhil but he refrains from being too judgmental toward Sandip. Bimala becomes the most sympathetic character simply because she faces the most ambivalence in the book. There are many blatant political overtures in this book but I find that it works well as human drama as well. You needn't be knowledgeable about the conflicts in India to appreciate the moral dilemmas presented in this tale. Reading this book made it easy to understand why Tagore was awarded a Nobel Prize.
Felolv
My heading for this review is a quote from this engaging novel. In some ways I now understand that indeed the greater truth may exist in the things that haven't happened, where the actions of people are imposed upon by their personal constraints - often to the detriment of all. But what a sentence for the writer to produce!!

This novel is told from the perspective of three people - Nikhil, his wife Bimala, and the activist (in the name of national India) Sandip. By hearing the story from each of them we understand their individual constraints and the drives they have, or lack, to realise their ambitions and desires. Rabindranath Tagore has not written this novel from the perspective of an all-seeing observer and this leads us - the readers - to be deeply entrenched in the individual characters' drives, passions, doubts, uncertainities and failures.

For me this is a very personal expose of my own drives, passions, doubts and failures. If only I could have the views of those around me similarly exposed - if I had some indication of their drives, passions, doubts and sense of failure I am sure that I could respond to them with greater confidence. But, of course, Nikhil, Bimala and Sandip do not have knowlege of each other's innermost thoughts (unlike we, the readers) so their struggle - all three of them - is just as difficult for them as mine is for me.

Did I end up liking any of these characters? Did I admire any of them? Was I appalled by any of them? These are questions I will not answer - read the book for yourself and you will develop your own views which may be as different for you as my constraints are as different from yours.

Here is another quote:

'What harm if you did have a wholesome fear of me? Does anybody know anybody else in this world?'
Tegore
One aspect that non-Indian readers will completely fail to realise is the boldness with which Tagore used to weave his imagination based on stark solid reality. Tagore was socially ostracised for his depiction of the passion (always cloaked and shrouded in the garbs of the civilsation, norms of the society) of an honourable aristrocatic married lady, which acts as the metaphor for the passions the society was undergoing in those turbulent days of political upheaval against the British Empire. A brilliant picture of the torment of the human character caught in the web of desire of ecstacy and quest for contentment, peace and bliss, this narrative draws a beautiful parallel to the miopic frenzy of the mob in its quest for subversion with the destructive consequences of unbridled passion, and an individual's attempt to bring harmony and order in the chaos, attaining salvation. Technically brilliant, this disturbingly beautiful tale is another of Tagore's timeless creation.