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by Katharine McMahon
Download The Alchemist's Daughter fb2
Contemporary
  • Author:
    Katharine McMahon
  • ISBN:
    0753821311
  • ISBN13:
    978-0753821312
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    phoenix; New Ed edition (2006)
  • Pages:
    320 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Contemporary
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1695 kb
  • ePUB format
    1616 kb
  • DJVU format
    1367 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    359
  • Formats:
    mbr txt doc azw


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The Alchemist's Daughter.

Established in 2004, we have over 500,000 books in stock. No quibble refund if not completely satisfied. The Alchemist's Daughter. ISBN 10: 1407216635, ISBN 13: 9781407216638.

There was no time to lose-she must start paying for herself immediately and would set sail in May. Not much of a refit was needed, just a little carpentry and a few adjustments to the hold. She said, Extra staff will need paying

From the author of Richard and Judy Book Club choice, THE ROSE OF SEBASTOPOL. A first-rate historical romance: it's hard to think it will be bettered this year' INDEPENDENT ON SUNDAY.

From the author of Richard and Judy Book Club choice, THE ROSE OF SEBASTOPOL. Dark secrets haunt the manor house at Selden in Buckinghamshire, where Emilie Selden, motherless, fiercely intelligent and beautiful, has been raised in near isolation by her father. John Selden, student of Isaac Newton, is conducting a secret experiment.

Secrets abound in this gripping tale of a young woman cloistered since birth who discovers that knowledge is no subsitute for experience when she choses to follow her heart over science. Raised by her father in near isolation in the English countryside, Emilie Selden is trained as a brilliant natural philosopher and alchemist.

By Katharine McMahon Read by Justine Eyre. About The Alchemist’s Daughter. Secrets abound in this gripping tale of a young woman cloistered since birth who discovers that knowledge is no subsitute for experience when she choses to follow her heart over science

By Katharine McMahon Read by Justine Eyre. By Katharine McMahon Read by Justine Eyre. Category: Historical Fiction. Secrets abound in this gripping tale of a young woman cloistered since birth who discovers that knowledge is no subsitute for experience when she choses to follow her heart over science. In the spring of 1725, during the English Age of Reason, father and daughter embark upon their most daring alchemical experiment to date-attempting to breathe life into dead matter.

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Katherine McMahon is a talented author and I'm looking forward to reading her novel 'The Crimson Rooms' in the . The Alchemist's Daughter is above all a beautifully told story, but like all of McMahon's books that I've read, it's a lot more than that

Katherine McMahon is a talented author and I'm looking forward to reading her novel 'The Crimson Rooms' in the near future. The Alchemist's Daughter is above all a beautifully told story, but like all of McMahon's books that I've read, it's a lot more than that. At the centre of the story is Emilie, the product of her father's experiment to raise her as a 'pure' alchemist to carry on his work. Cut off from the world, she is a first-class natural philosopher with absolutely no concept of basic things, like how to make choices, how to understand the I absolutely loved this, so much that I didn't want it to finish.

During the English Age of Reason, a woman cloistered since birth learns that knowledge is no substitute for experience.

What makes The Alchemist's Daughter more than a routine entertainment is McMahon's vivid sense of both the .

What makes The Alchemist's Daughter more than a routine entertainment is McMahon's vivid sense of both the natural world, and of the smells and illumined darkness of the Seldens' workroom. This is a book which reminds us that often what we call "cliches" are only the bad handling of matters with much vehement life in them yet. Roz Kaveney's 'From Alien to The Matrix' is published by B Tauris. Independent culture newsletter.

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Butius
McMahon created a heroine who is ahead of her time in her scientific learning, but who fails to be a well-rounded individual because of it. The limited focus of Emilie's studies has made her deficient in understanding of human motivations and interrelationships. Her experiments with alchemy intimately teach her how much she still has to learn about the essentials of life outside of the laboratory and in her personal relationships. In some ways, much fault is placed on her flawed character, which is perhaps unfair. Like an alchemy experiment, Emilie's known world must be almost completely destructed in order for her to know the truth, and perhaps remake her life into something new. However, there are instances in which Emilie's ignorance of the word should not absolve other characters from wrong doing against her, and there were inconsistencies in her character too, which were not developed enough to be fully effective. The second half of the novel seemed to drag in dissipation more than the first half, and as a reader it was missing a needful quality that I have not yet quite defined, perhaps it was hope or resolution? However, I think my dissatisfaction was more in the continuity of Emilie's transformation, and a desire to have that process be more complete and connected. The end of the novel was left open without resolution, which to some extent left me wondering what the point was and where this was going, though I like to think that the story continues with Emilie positively rebuilding her word with the blended aspects of herself, embracing intellect with a compassionate human worldliness, and achieving a wholeness within herself.
Yojin
While predictable, this was an entertaining read. I mean, the main character-- a bookish and protected natural scientist who is seduced by a gold digger-- isn't my favorite. And you could see the slow unraveling of her world and her husband's shenanigans like a million miles away.

On the other hand...history. History with references to Newton and Voltaire and a kind of sobering reality of how little power women had during that time.

The main character goes from being virtually an experiment to her father to a plaything for her husband. Despite her education, intelligence and social class. Those parts were not easy to read, not because of plotting or writing problems, but because she doesn't really find a way out of her gendered prison.

And in the last third of the book, she seems quite cold to me. She makes some decisions about continuing an experiment her father did that I didn't quite understand the implications of, nor the result which she calls a success although I didn't see evidence of that, and also in regards to her servant that seem a bit out of character.

And of course, the book ends just when some juicy emotional development might occur...so that was a tad abrupt feeling to me. But as I said above, it is an entertaining read.
virus
And at 18 years old, she has been educated in scientific method of the 18th Century, and once a year in alchemy, but kept by Sir John away from society altogether. She is beautiful, brilliant by intellectual standards, but vulnerably innocent. Perfect prey for grasping greed to acquire and betrayal to injure. The author creates characters who breathe, gasp, exult and suffer like the rest of us. There are the used and the users, and some redemption and reconciliation. McMahon’s research into historical events, characters, customs, and science of the era is remarkably realized in the people who look back at us from these pages.
Cordanara
I loved this book because it was not predictable. I was drawn in to the lives of the characters and the secrets burdens each carried. Parts became quite technical wait scientific descriptions, but were easy to figure out, look up or skim over. This is a good book for exploration and discussion of the various relationships among the characters. Themes explored are father/daughter love, bonds between children and their caretakers, nature vs nurture, abortion/adoption, marital faithfulness.
Gunos
I loved the blending of science, history and fashion. McMahon's research into to the time of Isaac Newton so infused her novel that I felt I was waking up each day into an early 18th-century morning. It's part romance, part mystery, and an almost mystical repetition of events between one generation and the next. It was an awful disappointment to find out that the book had ended. I so wanted the story to continue.
Globus
I enjoyed this book and would like reading about the next phase of this story. Some might find the alchemy details tedious. Some reviewers mentioned that that disliked the main character. I was often frustrated or angry with her, but that was part of the point of the book. This isn't for everyone but I liked that it was a totally different kind of novel.
Steelraven
I love historical fiction. I loved this story & the writing. Until. The. End. Literally ended during the climax. Thought my Kindle version was missing a few chapters. Nope. Another reviewer commented not all books need neat as a bow tied up ending, but I needed some type of ending. Maybe a sequel is coming?
This was a story that had many layers. Well written, but the story was a wee bit tedious. It was nice to get a feel of the early history that included Isaac Newton.