Download Fear of Flying fb2

by Erica Jong
Download Fear of Flying fb2
Contemporary
  • Author:
    Erica Jong
  • ISBN:
    0749396059
  • ISBN13:
    978-0749396053
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Vintage; New Ed edition (2006)
  • Pages:
    352 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Contemporary
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1179 kb
  • ePUB format
    1901 kb
  • DJVU format
    1333 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    265
  • Formats:
    doc rtf lrf docx


Fear of Flying is a 1973 novel by Erica Jong which became famously controversial for its portrayal of female sexuality and figured in the development of second-wave feminism.

Fear of Flying is a 1973 novel by Erica Jong which became famously controversial for its portrayal of female sexuality and figured in the development of second-wave feminism. The novel is written in the first person: narrated by its protagonist, Isadora Zelda White Stollerman Wing, a 29-year-old poet who has published two books of poetry.

There were 117 psychoanalysts on the Pan Am flight to Vienna and I’d been treated by at least six of them’: so opens Erica Jong’s iconic feminist 1973 novel Fear of Flying, famous for its unflinching depiction of female sexuality

There were 117 psychoanalysts on the Pan Am flight to Vienna and I’d been treated by at least six of them’: so opens Erica Jong’s iconic feminist 1973 novel Fear of Flying, famous for its unflinching depiction of female sexuality

Erica Jong Fear Of Flying Acknowledgments Chapter 12, The Madman, originally appeared in Ms. in a slightly different form. Читать онлайн Fear Of Flying.

Erica Jong Fear Of Flying Acknowledgments Chapter 12, The Madman, originally appeared in Ms. The 8:29 to Frankfurt by Erica Mann originally appeared in the Beloit Poetry Journal, Winter 68/69. For Grace Darling Griffin And for my grandfather, Samuel. Chapter 12, The Madman, originally appeared in Ms.

Erica Jong is the author of nineteen books of poetry, fiction, and memoir, including Fear of Flying, which has more than 18 million copies in print worldwide. Currently working on a novel featuring Isadora Wing-the heroine of Fear of Flying-as a woman of a certain age, Erica and her lawyer husband live in New York City and Connecticut. Her daughter, Molly Jong-Fast, is also an author. Erica Jong left a P.

A literary sensation when first published in 1973, Fear of Flying established Erica Jong as one of her generation’s foremost voices on sex and feminism. Nearly four decades later, the novel has lost none of its insight, verve, or jaw-dropping wi. .

The book has been reduced to two words, she said, but Ms. Jong was trying to say something larger.

Right, Ms. Jong in 1975. Melanie Burford/Prime for The Washington Post (Jong); Associated Press (Jong,1975). By Liesl Schillinger. The book has been reduced to two words, she said, but Ms. Ms. Rosenfeld and Ms. Baumgardner first read the book in the 1990s, in their 20s, at an age when, unlike Isadora and most women of Ms. Jong’s generation, they were not married. Isadora was divorced at 21, Ms. Rosenfeld said. And in my cohort, I simply didn’t know a single person who was married until I was 30.

Erica Jong (b. 1942) was raised in New York City, where she first attracted attention as a poet, winning various awards for two volumes of verse published in the early 1970s. But she is best known forher first novel, Fear of Flying, which struck a chord with a country still reeling from the sexual revolution. Though it initially drew controversy for its frank depiction of female sexuality, it has sold more than eighteen million copies worldwide. Jong followed Isadora Wing through three more novels: How to Save Your Own Life, Parachutes and Kisses, and Any Woman's Blues.

Erica Jong Fear Of Flying Acknowledgments 1 En Route to the Congress of Dreams or the Zipless Fuck 2 Every Woman Adores a Fascist 3 Knock, Knock 4 Near the Black Forest 5 A Report from the Congress of Dreams or Congressing 6 Paroxysms of Passion or the Man Under th.

Erica Jong Fear Of Flying Acknowledgments 1 En Route to the Congress of Dreams or the Zipless Fuck 2 Every Woman Adores a Fascist 3 Knock, Knock 4 Near the Black Forest 5 A Report from the Congress of Dreams or Congressing 6 Paroxysms of Passion or the Man Under the Bed 7 A Nervous Cough 8 Tales from the Vienna Woods 9. Pandora’s Box or My Two Mothers 10 Freud’s House 11 Existentialism Reconsidered 12 The Madman 13 The Conductor 14 Arabs amp; Other Animals 15 Travels with My Anti-Hero 16 Seduced amp; Abandoned 17 Dreamwork 18 Blood Weddings or Sic Transit 19 A 19th-Century Ending.

You will regret time not spent with a husband, a friend, a child, or a parent. The book begins with a question: "Why Henry Miller?"Miller remains among the most misunderstood of writers - seen either as a pornographer or a guru, a sexual enslaver or a sexual liberator, a prophet or a pervert. All the questions his life and oeuvre ra. Parachutes & Kisses.

The 30th Anniversary special!Originally published in 1973, the ground-breaking, uninhibited story of Isadora Wing and her desire to fly free caused a national sensation—and sold more than twelve million copies. Now, after thirty years, the iconic novel still stands as a timeless tale of self-discovery, liberation, and womanhood.

 


Ieregr
I read this book on its 40th anniversary. The forward explained the importance of its history in the 1970's when women had less choice about a career and a life outside of marriage. It is historical pertinent to understand the changes of a womens world today. For someone who is not on the east coast nor would have been in this time frame the story is cultural very different but the message of a women growing into themselves is still important.
Silly Dog
I've tried to read this book several times, but could never get very far. I had heard so much about it, that I tried again and again almost quit, but finally got into the story. I can see why it was so controversial at the beginning of the feminist movement, but I also see that it has stayed on reading lists because it still has a message today. Your happiness does not depend on someone else. You need to learn to be happy with yourself. A lesson for all of us. The reason I gave it 3 stars was because it was so hard to get into. I wonder how many others have tried to read it and given up?
Lanadrta
I enjoyed reading Erica's book after all this time, since it so scandalized the public long ago. The book was well crafted, but I found myself impatient with the young heroine for making herself so crazy. It's easy in hindsight to disregard my own missteps and uncertainties as a young woman coming-of-age at that time in history. We take ourselves so seriously!
Perdana
I wasn't sure at first if I would be able to get into the story, or not, but the writing was so engaging that I stuck with it and ended up loving everything about this book. Absolutely LOVE the way Erica Jong writes! I will be buying another of her books for my next read
interactive man
Reread this after nearly 45 years for my book club. Many parts are still relevant today. An interesting look back in order to see the present..
OCARO
This book may have been ground-breaking 40 years ago, but it doesn't really hold up in the same way in 2016. The main character is a typical woman in her 20s experiencing uncertainty and her thoughts & feelings are predictable and underdeveloped. I was especially bored when she went on and on and on about the issues she had with her mother.
Iaran
A great book to understand this particular wave of feminism through literature. It resonates as a woman in my early 30s despite the different social/historical experiences that I have had from the heroine.
I first read FEAR OF FLYING in 1977. I was 15. My algebra teacher nicked it from my hand, threw it in the trash can and told me it was pornographic garbage, but I was already halfway through the book and smart enough to know that wasn't true. I rescued the book and spent a few weeks in detention, but it was well worth it. FEAR OF FLYING blew my tiny mind on several levels.

Because of the open discussion of sex in FEAR OF FLYING, some of the other important themes get back-burnered. For me, having been raised in the 1960s attending Wisconsin Synod Lutheran churches and schools that were dominated by German culture, the greatest impact of the book was how it made me rethink everything I'd been taught about Jews. (Unscrupulously greedy. Killed Jesus. Automatically going to Hell.) Here was the fresh antidote to the heartbreaking guilt of Anne Frank and Corrie ten Boom, along with an electric cattle prod of enlightenment for a child indoctrinated with the party line about how Jews caused the Holocaust by telling Pontius Pilate, "Let his blood be on us and our children!"

Erica Jong's brilliantly wry descriptions of her family, observations about psychoanalysis and running inner dialogue about desire, ambition, pleasure, displeasure, sanity, insanity and womanhood freed my mind in a way that every 15-year-old mind needs to be freed if the 50-year-old to come along later is to be anything close to happy. Erica Jong's wit and intellect profoundly impacted my understanding of literary craft, and I went on to consume everything else she wrote. My evolution as a reader serendipitously coincided with her evolution as a writer. I consider her body of work a major element in my education as an author.

So now I'm 50, and I just now finished rereading FEAR OF FLYING for the first time since I rescued that battered paperback from the trash. It holds up beautifully, despite the intervening years. The world has changed, but the human heart has not. It never has and never will, and that's what blew my tiny mind this time around. FEAR OF FLYING is a book that begs to be revisited and deserves a place in every enlightened woman's library. Highly, truly, passionately recommended.