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by Roddy Doyle
Download The Woman Who Walked into Doors: A Novel (A Paula Spencer Novel) fb2
Contemporary
  • Author:
    Roddy Doyle
  • ISBN:
    0140255125
  • ISBN13:
    978-0140255126
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Viking; Open Market Ed edition (January 1, 1997)
  • Pages:
    240 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Contemporary
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1478 kb
  • ePUB format
    1130 kb
  • DJVU format
    1390 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    818
  • Formats:
    txt lrf lit mobi


The narrator is Paula Spencer - née O'Leary. THE WOMAN WHO WALKED INTO DOORS is the story of her life. At the time of her narration it is 1995 and she is thirty-nine.

a compassion that is scorching. Roddy Doyle is an internationally bestselling writer. His first three novels-The Commitments, The Snapper, and the 1991 Booker Prize finalist The Van-are known as The Barrytown Trilogy. The narrator is Paula Spencer - née O'Leary.

The Woman Who Walked Into Doors (1996) is a novel by Irish writer Roddy Doyle, adapted from the 1994 RTÉ/BBC miniseries Family. The novel tells the struggle and survival of an abused wife named Paula Spencer. It is narrated by the victim. The title comes from an incident narrated in the book, where Paula's husband asks her how she received a bruise he was responsible for, and she replies that she "walked into a door. A sequel, Paula Spencer, was published in 2006.

Электронная книга "The Woman Who Walked into Doors: A Novel", Roddy Doyle

Электронная книга "The Woman Who Walked into Doors: A Novel", Roddy Doyle. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Woman Who Walked into Doors: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Doyle triumphs in The Woman Who Walked Into Doors because he remembers what other male writers .

Doyle triumphs in The Woman Who Walked Into Doors because he remembers what other male writers have forgotten – that his heroine is more than just a woman. Mainly, she is a human being. It is this mixture of spirit and grief that makes The Woman Who Walked Into Doors a painful and beautiful story, a tale where the sadness and despair are redeemed because they are never denied. San Francisco Chronicle. Magnificently constructed.

Roddy Doyle 's beautifully wrought tale revisits the Dublin housewife-heroine of his earlier acclaimed novel, The Woman Who Walked Into Doors. Paula is now forty-seven, her abusive husband is long dead, and it's been four months and five days since she's had a drink

Roddy Doyle 's beautifully wrought tale revisits the Dublin housewife-heroine of his earlier acclaimed novel, The Woman Who Walked Into Doors. Paula is now forty-seven, her abusive husband is long dead, and it's been four months and five days since she's had a drink. She cleans offices to get by and lives from paycheck to paycheck. But as she manages to get through each day sober, she begins to piece her life back together and to resurrect her family. Told with the unmistakable wit of Doyle's unique voice, this is a redemptive tale about a brave and tenacious woman.

Paula Spencer, in The Women Who Walked into Doors, is such a woman. It’s as if, fresh off his Booker, he decided to write a novel about domestic violence. Told in the first person, there are rambling monologues by Paula. I read it because I read Roddy Doyle’s Two Pints and thought it was hilarious. She repeats herself, the same phrases over and over – ‘Leave my Mammy alone’ ‘I fell’ ‘No one saw me’.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. In this new novel, set in contemporary Dublin, Roddy Doyle returns to Paula Spencer (One of Doyles finest creations Toronto Star), the beloved heroine of the bestselling The Woman Who Walked into Doors, with spec. In this new novel, set in contemporary Dublin, Roddy Doyle returns to Paula Spencer (One of Doyles finest creations Toronto Star), the beloved heroine of the bestselling The Woman Who Walked into Doors, with spectacular results. Paula Spencer begins on the eve of Paulas forty-eighth birthday. She hasnt had a drink for four months and five days. Having outlived an abusive husband and father, Paula and her four children are now struggling to live their adult lives, with two of the kids balancing their own addictions

Roddy Doyle introduces us to her in all her complexity.

Roddy Doyle introduces us to her in all her complexity. Through him she tells her life story. When we read a novel we engage with the character in a different way. We can perhaps get under their skin and more fully realise how for some people cigarettes are sexy- they're worth the stench and the cancer,11 as Paula Spencer says. Reading The Woman Who Walked Into Doors, we are reminded not only of the power of cigarettes, but of the power of love and lust, the forces that much health education breaks its back over. And we see why it took Paula seventeen years to leave Charlo.

Paula Spencer is a novel by Irish writer Roddy Doyle, published in 2006. The novel is a sequel to Doyle's 1996 book The Woman Who Walked Into Doors, describing the life of alcoholic and battered wife Paula Spencer. The second book picks up her life ten years after the death of her husband.

Paula Spencer, a working class woman in Dublin, learns at the outset of the novel that her husband, Charlo, has been shot dead by the police. The incident sends Paula spiraling backward and forward in her memories to visit and revisit and revisit again and again key moments in her life. The fascination of the story comes in watching her carefully reframed memories struggle with and ultimately succumb to the reality of her abusive husband

From the Booker Prize-winning author of Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha, the heartrending story of a brave and tenacious housewife Look for Roddy Doyle’s new novel, Smile, coming in October of 2017Paula Spencer is a thirty-nine-year-old working-class woman struggling to reclaim her dignity after marriage to an abusive husband and a worsening drinking problem. Paula recalls her contented childhood, the audacity she learned as a teenager, the exhilaration of her romance with Charlo, and the marriage to him that left her feeling powerless. Capturing both her vulnerability and her strength, Roddy Doyle gives Paula a voice that is real and unforgettable.

Fenrinos
I taught British Literature for twenty years and believe the modern Irish writers are producing the best prose in English today. Roddy Doyle won the Man Booker Prize for Paddy Clark, Ha Ha Ha. His Barrytown Triology deserves to be read for sheer enjoyment. The Woman Who Walked Into Doors broached a touchy subject: spousal abuse. With alcohol abuse being fairly common and divorce not accepted (or even legal until relatively recently), this problem was not often discussed. Irish readers were a bit shocked, even angry,when Doyle wrote about Paula Spencer, who would say she had walked into a door when she had to go to the clinic after being beaten, or thrown down the stairs, by Charlo,her abusive husband. Paula outlives Charlo (the way he dies is hilarious and the reaction of Paula and her sisters is even funnier). Her story continues in Doyle's following novel, called Paula Spencer. She is one of Doyle's most finely crafted characters.
Wiliniett
Once again Roddy Doyle writes about the working-class of Dublin, Ireland. The narrator is Paula Spencer -- née O'Leary. THE WOMAN WHO WALKED INTO DOORS is the story of her life. At the time of her narration it is 1995 and she is thirty-nine. She is a widow; she has three children living with her and a fourth who has disappeared (she fears he now is a heroin addict); she works cleaning houses in the morning and a downtown office in the evening; she is an alcoholic; but somehow she is managing to keep the pared-down household afloat. The key to her survival, it emerges, is her grit and her indomitable personality.

Paula had a rather dull childhood, made worse by being pigeonholed in secondary school as one of the dumb ones. She had been the first of her group to develop tits, and in school she had to spend inordinate energy preventing the boys, as well as the male teachers, from feeling her up. Her passport to glamour and excitement came when she saw Charlo Spencer at a dance: "He was with a gang but all by himself. His hands in his pockets with the thumbs hooked over the denim and a [butt] hanging from his mouth. It got me then and it gets me now: cigarettes are sexy -- they're worth the stench and the cancer. * * * I was sweating a bit. And I felt the sweat when I saw Charlo. This wasn't a crush -- this wasn't David Cassidy or David Essex over there -- it was sex. I wanted to go over there and bite him."

After a two-year courtship they married. Up to that point, life with Charlo was, for Paula, given her background, the fairy-tale life of a princess. But soon after marriage she became pregnant and one night, well into her pregnancy when she felt "ugly, fat and full of someone else's hairy body", Charlo hit her -- punched her square in the face. For the next seventeen years he continued to beat and batter her. "Broken nose. Loose teeth. Cracked ribs. Broken finger. Black eyes. I don't know how many; I once had two at the same time, one fading, the other new. Shoulders, elbows, knees, wrists. Stitches in my mouth. Stitches on my chin. A ruptured eardrum. Burns. * * * He dragged me around the house by my clothes and by my hair. He kicked me up and he kicked me down the stairs." When she needed medical attention, as was frequently the case, Charlo took her to the hospital and stayed with her while she was treated, the ever-solicitous husband. What happened? She had fallen down the stairs. Or she had walked into a door. Yet again.

Paula's harrowing story of those seventeen years of abuse is relegated to the last quarter of the novel. The first three quarters set the stage. Despite the many bleak aspects of her life, they are a joy to read because Paula is so irrepressible, constantly surprising and delighting you with her humor or her wisdom. That first part of the novel also contains the story of how Paula came to be a widow. To find out about that, and about how a year earlier she finally ousted Charlo from the house, you will have to read the novel. It will be an unforgettable experience.
Jozrone
I'm reviewing the book, not the seller. I've read several Roddy Doyle novels before but have not been impressed by him--until now. This slender little book is sublime. His understanding of and expression of this woman's life through her eyes makes it hard to believe it was written by a man.
Steel balls
Roddy Doyle writes beautifully, even when he is writing in the voice of a battered wife who neglects her children for alcohol and makes excuses for the man who tore her to tatters for seventeen years. The story was heart breaking yet impossible to put down. Mr. Doyle's dialogue is always written with precision and you feel as if you are sitting in the room with the characters, wanting to challenge their poor decisions yet understanding them at the same time.
Qus
I would recommend this book to a friend. It is not a happy story, but the main character is immensely likable, and her story is interesting and worth reading. I liked Paula Spencer. She's funny, insightful, vulnerable and charming. She is also flawed, which makes her seem very real to me. It was hard to read this book though, because the shadow of her tragedy creeps across every page. Doyle waits until the final chapters to tell us, though, about Paula's battering at the hands of a man she loves, her "shattered" husband, Charlo. The title tells us what we do and do not want to know, so I think it's fine that Doyle waits until the end to reveal it all.

This book is written in the first person, and as an American the Irish vernacular was initially difficult for me, but Paula's inner dialogue is well written, and very enjoyable. I think I might have picked up a few Irish colloquialisms.

Kudos to Roddy Doyle! He has created a wonderful, likable, character in Paula Spencer.
JoJolar
This novel is Roddy Doyle at his finest. The story is about a woman who is consistently
emotionally and then physically abused by her spouse. She turns to alcohol in order to
deny the extreme horror of her situation. She appears to be a classic victim of learned
helplessness until he does something that forces her to act.

This is a sad and tragic book. One hopes throughout the book that she will have the
strength to leave her monster of a husband. Does she or doesn't she. Only reading the
book will give you the answer.