» » Pebble in the Sky (Empire)

Download Pebble in the Sky (Empire) fb2

by Isaac Asimov
Download Pebble in the Sky (Empire) fb2
Contemporary
  • Author:
    Isaac Asimov
  • ISBN:
    0345335635
  • ISBN13:
    978-0345335630
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Del Rey Books (1983)
  • Pages:
    231 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Contemporary
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1169 kb
  • ePUB format
    1941 kb
  • DJVU format
    1126 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    747
  • Formats:
    mbr docx lrf lit


ORB. A tom doherty associates book.

ORB. The characters and the incidents in this book are entirely the product of the author’s imagination and have no relation to any person or event in real life.

Pebble in the Sky is a science fiction novel by American writer Isaac Asimov, published in 1950. This work is his first novel - parts of the Foundation series had appeared from 1942 onwards in magazines, but Foundation was not published in book form until 1951.

Isaac Asimov's Pebble in the Sky is an early work and the first in the loosely connected Trantorian Empire series

Isaac Asimov's Pebble in the Sky is an early work and the first in the loosely connected Trantorian Empire series. In this universe, set far into the future, Earth has populated the galaxy, but has since fallen on hard times due to a population crash as a result of widespread radioactive contamination. Readers familiar with the Foundation Trilogy will encounter elements that form common touch-points between this book and that series.

This is young Isaac Asimov's first novel, full of wonders and ideas, the book that launched the novels of the Galactic Empire, culminating in the Foundation books and novels. It is also one of that select group of SF adventures that since the early 1950s has hooked generations of teenagers on reading science fiction.

Читать онлайн Pebble In The Sky. Asimov Isaac. That's more ridiculous still. Why should a man of the Empire come here to Earth, of all places?" "I don't know why!

Isaac Asimov Pebble In The Sky To my father, who first introduced me to science fiction. 1. Between One Footstep And The Next Two minutes before he disappeared forever from the face of the Earth he knew, Joseph Schwartz strolled along the pleasant streets of suburban Chicago quoting Browning to himself. In a sense this was strange, since Schwartz would scarcely have impressed any casual passer-by as the Browning-quoting type. Читать онлайн Pebble In The Sky. Why should a man of the Empire come here to Earth, of all places?" "I don't know why!

Pebble in the Sky. Author : Isaac Asimov. Joseph Schwartz is sixty-two. This is the young Isaac Asimov's first novel, full of wonders and ideas, the book that launched the novels of the Galactic Empire, culminating in the Foundation series. This is Golden Age SF at its finest.

Pebble in the Sky. Genres : Science Fiction.

Isaac Asimov was born in Petrovichi, Russia, on January 2, 1920. Asimov won numerous awards and honors for his books and stories, and he is considered to be a leading writer of the Golden Age of science fiction. His family emigrated to the United States in 1923 and settled in Brooklyn, New York, where they owned and operated a candy store. Asimov became a naturalized . citizen at the age of eight. As a youngster he discovered his talent for writing, producing his first original fiction at the age of eleven. While he did not invent science fiction, he helped to legitimize it by adding the narrative structure that had been missing from the traditional science fiction books of the period.

Pebble in the Sky is the first novel by celebrated, multi-award winning science fiction Grand Master Isaac Asimov. Full of wonders and ideas, this is the book that launched the novels of the Galactic Empire, culminating in the Foundation books and novels

Pebble in the Sky is the first novel by celebrated, multi-award winning science fiction Grand Master Isaac Asimov. Full of wonders and ideas, this is the book that launched the novels of the Galactic Empire, culminating in the Foundation books and novels. One moment Joseph Schwartz is a happily retired tailor in 1949 Chicago

One moment Joseph Schwartz is a happily retired tailor in Chicago, 1949. The next he's a helpless stranger on Earth during the heyday of the first Galactic Empire. Earth, as he soon learns, is a backwater, just a pebble in the sky, despised by all the other 200 million planets of the Empire because its people dare to claim it's the original home of man. And Earth is poor, with great areas of radioactivity ruining much of its soil--so poor that everyone is sentenced to death at the age of sixty. Joseph Schwartz is sixty-two. This is young Isaac Asimov's first novel, full of wonders and ideas, the book that launched the novels of the Galactic Empire, culminating in the Foundation series. This is Golden Age SF at its finest.

Kamuro
Isaac Asimov's Pebble in the Sky is an early work and the first in the loosely connected Trantorian Empire series. In this universe, set far into the future, Earth has populated the galaxy, but has since fallen on hard times due to a population crash as a result of widespread radioactive contamination. Over the course of thousands of years, the rest of the galaxy cannot even believe that Earth is their original birthplace and regard Earth as a backwater. Into this mix come two individuals, the first is an unorthodox archaeologist who holds the heretical theory that Earth is the original site of humanity (as opposed to the prevailing belief of a multi-locale, parallel development) and a victim of some accident that sends a human from the past (our time) forward to the time of the tale. The latter becomes the subject of an experiments to increase intelligence.

Against this backdrop, the Earth political rulers are plotting a secret biological warfare attack on the rest of the empire. Needless to say, there is much confusion about what exactly is going on as a result of ingrained prejudices and underestimation of capabilities by just about everyone. Although the overall plot is a bit far-fetched, the political posturings are well crafted with a suitably Machiavellian string puller calling the shots. This is definitely slanted towards a juvenile audience.
Haal
Of the three books that make up the "trilogy" of Galactic Empire stories ("The Stars Like Dust", "The Currents of Space" and "Pebble in the Sky") this is the best of the three, although they're all entertaining and bear Asimov's unmistakeable style. Readers familiar with the Foundation Trilogy will encounter elements that form common touch-points between this book and that series. This series was not conceived of as a "trilogy", but clearly are placed along a fictional historic thread that predates the Foundation Trilogy, but don't suffer from the artifice apparent in other, later works that make a deliberate attempt to link to that series (e.g. "Prelude to Foundation" and the many novels that tie together some of Asimov's other series and the original Foundation Trilogy). I believe that Pebble in the Sky was the last of the three to be written, and shows Asimov's greater maturity as a writer - the characters are a bit more three-dimensional, and while the first two books are notable for their lack of villains (the antagonists are eventually seen as reacting to historical, political and economic circumstances, an archetype that recurs in Asimov's writing), "Pebble In The Sky" introduces a more conventional villain character that represents another Asimovian (is that a word?) archetype that will be familiar to those who have read some of his other works.
6snake6
I noticed this book on my shelf the other day and decided to reread it (only I had to buy the kindle edition because I can no longer read physical books). I think I must have originally read this when I was in high school, back in the dark ages. It has held up remarkably well. The book is still entertaining. The characters are interesting, the plot believable (even if a little outdated scientifically). It reminds me of why I started reading science fiction in the first place.Although it is billed as the third book in the Galactic Empire series, it stands very well on its own, something I really appreciate in a series book.

If you haven't read Asimov, if you think classical science fiction might be boring, think again. Pebble in the Sky is as good a place as any to quaint yourself with some of the best writing this genre has to offer.
Gashakar
Generic review for Asimov's books because I bought all of them for my collection and am writing ALL of the reviews at once.

I love everyone of his books, and each brings a great story to the table, if you are looking for a good Saga to start reading, check out his Foundation / Robot series. I've read them all the way through several times and each time, loved each book. Each book builds off the one prior and adds a whole new dynamic to the overall universe while still being able to be enjoyed individually. If you are reading this review, Just check out the book, I guarantee it will be worth it.
Doath
I've read a lot of Asimov. I realize this was an early effort and it showed. The plot has a fairly interesting "what if" set-up, to avoid spoilers. The execution leads a lot to be desired. The characters are flat and uninteresting. Their world(s) are described in passing, too bad, because setting them in some context would have given some insights into motivations. But, if you like a story with a lot of dialog, characters talking and talking and talking about what just happened, then thinking about it, and talking about it some more, here is the novel for you. Just about the time I thought, "At last, he's going to get the story moving," we adjourn and there's lengthy passages of dialog from others about the meaning of what just happened. Zzzzzz. I finished the book since someone selected it for a discussion group and, come to think of it, maybe it's oddly fitting. Talking about talking. A lot.
Bluddefender
It is the first novel by Asimov, but his talent is already evident, even if the plot is still rough on the edges.
It was interesting to read this novel for the first time after reading all Foundation and Robot series. The Asimov's Galactic Empire is already there and the psychic powers of the Second Foundation wizards as well. No robots though.
Written in the 50s, there are no cell phone or other tech that we take for granted, and the inability to be "always connected" provides for some plot points.
The protagonist surname and his attitude remind us that the novel was written in almost immediate aftetmath of WWII and the Holocaust. Fascist undertones of villains are evident, and the triumph of democracy is lauded. Some truths never fade, even when more modern books take much more nuanced views on heroism and villainy.
Overall, the exciting read, even after 60 years.