Download Mirage fb2

by Bandula Chandraratna
Download Mirage fb2
Contemporary
  • Author:
    Bandula Chandraratna
  • ISBN:
    0753812533
  • ISBN13:
    978-0753812532
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    PHOENIX (ORIO); New Ed edition (September 6, 2001)
  • Pages:
    224 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Contemporary
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1574 kb
  • ePUB format
    1402 kb
  • DJVU format
    1274 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    529
  • Formats:
    mbr lrf mbr doc


by. Chandraratna, Bandula.

by. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Bandula Chandraratna (Author). The title is the key to understanding Mirage. ISBN-13: 978-1574231953. Chapters 1-23 are indeed a mirage, an ancient land of milk and honey, a delicate pastoral simplicity, a precarious balance of old and new as oil wealth and Westernization impinge of bedrock religious values. But in Chapters 24-25, the reality underlying the mirage erupts with all the fierce violence that characterizes much of the region today. Chandraratna got it right - weeks, months, perhaps years of tranquility suddenly shattered by piercing screams from an honor killing wherein the victim of the crime is executed.

by Bandula Chandraratna. Sayeed is an ordinary man living a difficult life in a shanty town in a Middle Eastern Kingdom. It is a place of minimal aspirations where even modest hopes are not usually fulfilled. In the meantime, if you know any books with non-binary main characters you think we should include, please let us know. Success against the odds.

See if your friends have read any of Bandula Chandraratna's books. Bandula Chandraratna’s Followers (1). Bandula Chandraratna. Bandula Chandraratna’s books.

Bandula Chandraratna has worked in hospitals in Saudi Arabia and the UK and presently lives and works in Oundle, Northamptonshire.

There is a simplicity to Mirage, this story of star-crossed lovers whose brief happiness is cut short, that belies the skill of its telling. A Look Inside an Alien World. com User, December 4, 2007.

BookDragon Books for the Multi-Culti Reader. Mirage by Bandula Chandraratna

BookDragon Books for the Multi-Culti Reader. Mirage by Bandula Chandraratna. Originally self-published in London by Sri Lankan-born Chandraratna, then becoming a contender for the prestigious Man Booker Prize in 1999, Mirage simply tells the heartbreaking story of Sayeed, a quiet man getting on in years who marries a beautiful widow with a young child. He brings his new family to the city where he has work, away from the comforts of the home village, only to meet with tragedy and utter loss.

Mirage By : Bandula Chandraratna. Mirage emerged from 1999¿s Booker judging as the unexpected favourite of the chairman, Gerald Kaufman, and other judges, just missing the final shortlist. Views: 431. Author: Bandula Chandraratna. Publication Date: 14/12/2009. It was later chosen by two of the judges, Boyd Tonkin and Shena Mackay as one of their books of that year. What made this championing of a first novel all the more surprising was the fact that it had been published by the author himself. Chandraratna plans to take up the story of Sayeed through the eyes of Latifa¿s little daughter Leila in the second volume of a proposed trilogy.

Bandula Chandraratna. Showing all works by author. Would you like to see only ebooks? Mirage.

Author : Bandula Chandraratna. Publisher : Penguin India. R. 25 on (Shipping charges may apply) R. 50 kart (FREE Delivery). A touching, powerful tale of humble lives, as spellbinding as it is devastating Orphaned as a boy, Sayeed sacrificed his own happiness to care for his younger brother, leaving him and his growing family, their parents’ home and land in a verdant village in an unnamed Muslim country to move to the city, where he lives precariously in a dusty shantytown and works.


ACOS
The title is the key to understanding Mirage. Chapters 1-23 are indeed a mirage, an ancient land of milk and honey, a delicate pastoral simplicity, a precarious balance of old and new as oil wealth and Westernization impinge of bedrock religious values. But in Chapters 24-25, the reality underlying the mirage erupts with all the fierce violence that characterizes much of the region today. Chandraratna got it right - weeks, months, perhaps years of tranquility suddenly shattered by piercing screams from an honor killing wherein the victim of the crime is executed. To confront another face of this reality from a Western perspective, read Hilary Mantel's (1988) Eight Months on Ghazzah Street: A Novel, a chilling experience which, like Mirage, may leave you puzzled until you know that alien world.
Azago
After reading the "official" view for this book, I was looking forward to reading it. After finishing, it, though, I have to say it was one of the worst books I've read in my entire life! (And I do a lot of reading!) Ordinarly I would finish such a short book in one sitting, but this was was so incredibly boring that it took me several days. The first part of the book dragged on so slowly I felt like tearing my hair out! In writing classes, they always stress attention to detail, but this author takes that tip to extremes. (For example, instead of just saying that the main character, Sayeed, "brushed his teeth", this simple act is described in 5 or 6 sentences. In fact, Sayeed's complete morning hygiene ritual is described in excruciating detail.

Ordinarily, if a book doesn't "grab" me in the first 50 pages, I quit reading, but I made an exception in this case because I was curious to find out what happens in the end; and the book was short (thank God!!!) so I kept on. It wasn't until at least halfway through the book that any real action occurred--when Sayeed went to visit his brother. Once this happened, the pace of the book moved more quickly. The interactions between Sayeed and his brother's family were interesting (although Sayeed's sudden switch from being against the marriage to accepting it was a bit puzzling).

The worst part of the book, for me, was the final 10 or 15 pages. As the other reviewers have stated, the way the ending was resolved was disappointing. After moving at a snail's pace for 100 or so pages, suddenly everything happens within a few pages of the end, so there was no opportunity to gain a sense of WHY what happened at the end happened. It was just a hurried, jumbled mess and by the time I finally finished the book I was fuming at myself for sticking it out until the end and not giving it up by page 10!!!

OK, now for the praise, such as it is. (I'm a firm believer in "Thumper's Rule" - If you can't say something nice, don't say nothing at all".) Ever since I read this book (which was back in early April) I've been trying to figure out how it nearly won a prestigious award. I've kept thinking I must have missed something when reading the book. It's only after mulling it over for 2 months that I've come to the realization that the author may have intentionally structured the book the way he/she did. Devoting pages and pages to Sayeed's tiniest routine moment may have been done not only to show how boring his life was, but also to demonstrate how one simple, well-intentioned action can go spiralling out of control in an instant. If this was the author's intent, then it was successful. And I do have to give the author credit for being a capable writer (great attention to detail!! :) For these reasons, I changed the rating to a 3 instead of the 1 I initially put down. It may make some good points, but it's still a boring (and disappointing) read! (And I'm still mad at myself for finishing it!)
Kirinaya
** Slight Spoiler? **
Like all the reviews I can find say, Chandraratna's prose are quite elegant. Simple, but beautiful. But as I reached what felt like the climax of the book, I realized there were only a few pages still in my hands. The book ended abruptly and left me questions what, exactly, Chandraratna wanted me to understand about the main character's life.
The main character, Sayeed, is a good man, simple and uneducated and hard-working. He is driven by events that happen around him, and makes use of the small opportunities that appear. He lives his life as a good Muslim, but is not intolerant of the non-muslims in the hospital where he works. He does not begrudge foreigners like many of his peers... he simply makes the best of his existence without complaint, and neither laziness nor entrepreneurship.
When, in the last five pages, his life dramatically and violently changes, I was just left wondering what the hell he's going to do now, and how devestated he and all of the other characters will be. Perhaps this is Chandraratna's point? That everything can change and that you have no idea what will happen next... But for such a pleasant book, I was left feeling unfulfilled and with an unpleasant taste in my mouth.
Morad
Mirage is a poorly written book about the interaction between the main characters and their social environment around them. I would have appreciated a more informative and imaginative work of fiction dealing with Saudi Arabia's cruelty in its modernity. Compared to A Nector in a Sieve, which handles the same core concepts of poverty, love, economics, etc., Mirage failed in its attempt to convey such messages by not building the story line properly. Towards the ending, the actions were rushed and unbelievable. Overall, the author failed to educate and engage the reader in this dramatic depiction of gains and losses in a religious, unequal society.