Download Paper Chase fb2

by Jr John Jay Osborn
Download Paper Chase fb2
Contemporary
  • Author:
    Jr John Jay Osborn
  • ISBN:
    0340245581
  • ISBN13:
    978-0340245583
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Coronet Books (January 1, 1976)
  • Subcategory:
    Contemporary
  • FB2 format
    1177 kb
  • ePUB format
    1773 kb
  • DJVU format
    1619 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    640
  • Formats:
    lrf mbr doc docx


The Paper Chase is John Jay Osborn’s 1971 novel of law school and the main character Hart’s mostly one sided psychic war with contracts professor Kingsfield. Osborn started writing The Paper Chase in his first year at the Harvard Law School

The Paper Chase is John Jay Osborn’s 1971 novel of law school and the main character Hart’s mostly one sided psychic war with contracts professor Kingsfield. Osborn started writing The Paper Chase in his first year at the Harvard Law School. I’ve probably come to Osborn’s novel backwards

The Paper Chase is John Jay Osborn’s 1971 novel of law school and the main character Hart’s mostly one sided psychic war with contracts professor Kingsfield.

John Jay Osborn Jr. (born August 5, 1945) is an American author, lawyer and legal academic. The book was made into a 1973 film starring John Houseman and Timothy Bottoms. Houseman won an Oscar for his performance as contracts professor Kingsfield

I imagine many readers will be put off by the impenetrability of the characters, but personally I found this compelling because Osborn absolutely nails the many, many anxieties and insecurities of academia.

I imagine many readers will be put off by the impenetrability of the characters, but personally I found this compelling because Osborn absolutely nails the many, many anxieties and insecurities of academia. A solid campus novel; I only wish it it had been a little longer and given the characters a little more room to breathe. It all started out very seriously and ended as a comedy. I think you can only take your first love affair seriously and then, only if it happens to you when you’re young enough to take it to heart. John Jay Osborn J. The Paper Chase.

No part of this Work may be reproduced or transmitted. John jay osborn, jr. Peninsula road press 2011.

Both the book and the movie are first-rate entertainment I am in my twenties, so I obviously missed the movie and TV show, this book never needed the visual stimulation.

Both the book and the movie are first-rate entertainment. The author finds a way to make fascinating the travails of first-year law students, through expert characterizations and a dramatic presentation of the technical aspects of learning the law. Great for the First Year Law Student! Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 11 years ago. I absolutely loved this book. I am in my twenties, so I obviously missed the movie and TV show, this book never needed the visual stimulation. Greatly recommended for students thinking about law school. Extremely entertaining and stimulating.

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John Jay Osborn, Jr. is an American author, lawyer and legal academic. The Paper Chase also became a television series. Osborn wrote several of the scripts. Osborn's other books include The Associates, The Man Who Owned New York, and The Only Thing I've Done Wrong. The book was made into a movie starring John Houseman and Timothy Bottoms. Osborn's other books include The Associates, The Man Who Owned New York, and The Only Thing I've Done Wrong

The book was made into a movie starring John Houseman and Timothy Bottoms.

The book was made into a movie starring John Houseman and Timothy Bottoms. Houseman won an Oscar for his performance as contracts professor Kingsfield. The Paper Chase" also became a popular television series. Osborn's other books include "The Associates", "The Man Who Owned New York", and "The Only Thing I've Done Wrong".


Onetarieva
“The Paper Chase” is John Jay Osborn’s 1971 novel of law school and the main character Hart’s mostly one sided psychic war with contracts professor Kingsfield.

Osborn started writing “The Paper Chase” in his first year at the Harvard Law School. The novel is formatted like a series of vignettes of law school linked together by Hart’s romance with Kingsfield’s daughter Susan, a relationship he finds every bit as challenging and frustrating as his relationship with her father.

I’ve probably come to Osborn’s novel backwards. I was first a fan of “The Paper Chase” TV series, later I saw the 1973 movie version of “The Paper Chase” and now, finally Osborn’s novel. The main characters focus around the study group formed by Ford, and includes Hart, Anderson, Bell, and Brooks (if you’ve seen either the movie or the TV series you understand the lack of the characters first names). In the novel the characters aren’t as well defined as in either the movie or the TV series, both of which Osborn had a large input in; for instance nowhere is Ford’s background mentioned, not even a physical description. There are a few tantalizing peeks at some of the personalities behind the characters, Bell is obsessed with his property outline, which he believes will supersede the casebook, and he turns out to be a selfish creep.

“The Paper Chase” was created right at the end of the 60’s, 1970 but the counterculture mindset was still fully engaged, and the movie and the TV series always reflected those values (although Kingsfield and the college itself were conservative counter-balances). None of that exists in the novel, maybe Osborn employed a Hemingwayesque philosophy in the novel of it’s not only what you put in the book but that which is left out. The adversarial relationship between Hart and Kingsfield isn’t as well defined as in later iterations, although the characters comment upon it. Perhaps “The Paper Chase” is meant to be seen so much through Hart’s point of view that it focuses only on aspects that present themselves in the immediacy of the moment.

“The Paper Chase” is a compelling read and like the law school itself stands intact over the years as students pass through it and time passes around it.
Endieyab
I've been a huge fan of the movie since it's release all those years ago. I described the plot line as predictable only because I'd seen the movie (many , many, times BTW) I think just about all of us have had a boss or a teacher that was like Kingsfield.
Timberahue
I had seen the movie years ago and for some reason assumed it was an adaptation of Scott Turow's "One-L" memoir. That said, the novel is a little dated - a 1970s era work with a lot of short chapters of more character sketches then a coherent plot also less classroom/Kingsfield interaction
Kerdana
Years ago I thoroughly enjoyed the television adaptation of this story, and now I can say the same about the book. I can envision the characters, that is how well the show was cast. And now I can say that I thoroughly enjoyed the book. I recommend this, in the words of John Houseman, You come in with a mind full of mush and leave thinking like a lawyer.
Obong
I have seen the movie several times, enjoyed the TV series, and only now, decades later, have I gotten around to reading the book. And the book is not bad; certainly it is excellent for a first novel, as indeed it was. I went back and forth as between three stars and four, but fairness seems to dictate that a book as influential as this one is worthy of at least four stars.

As probably everyone knows, this is the fictitious story of one James Hart, and his various study-buddies at Harvard Law School, sometime in the late 1960s or early 1970s. In my opinion the novel, in common with the film, exaggerates and over-dramatizes the stress of law school. Having said that, there is enough truth in the novel (and the film) to have made this one an instant classic.

The writing style, while imperfect, is impressive for a first novel, and this one is a quick and easy read. Highly recommended. RJB.
saafari
I've been looking for this book for years, since I lost my dog eared copy that was published in conjunction with the television series back in the early 80s. The show was what initially turned me on to the novel, and then I saw the film. If you remember the series, and have seen the film, then the book will offer not that many surprises, and I mean that in a positive way. They follow Osborn's novel pretty faithfully, with the addition, as a reflectionof the time in which they were made, of female students. All three follow the education of first year Harvard law student James Hart, during which time the true test for him is not the grades he will get (as his lover Susan tells him, he is the kind of guy born for law school), but more to the point, will he, as he slaves away to earn those precious A's, lose his...well, heart, his soul, the spark of humanity made up primarily of compassion that seems to be the first casuality of the cut-throat world of the law school. Osborn's book is low-key, is subtle: to its credit, it does not inflate this conflict unrealistically. As in the movie, Hart never loses sight of the ring: the Harvard degree that will make him most likely wealthy and powerful. But the question Osborn presents is how does one get the ring and keep his soul intact? Is it possible? What compromises does it call for? Heady stuff for a little book, but Osborn pulls it off effectively and convincingly.

It's a very very good novel: if you cared for the film, if you remember the travails of Hart and his crew in the series (depicted much more kindly than they are in the book), then you should read the original. It's worth it.
Yayrel
I am an incoming 1L class of 2020. I enjoyed the book. It was an interesting, relatable story centered on a character, Mr. Hart, that quickly grows on you. I have seen the movie Paper Chase several times and the book does not disappoint.