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by Patrick. McCabe
Download EMERALD GERMS OF IRELAND. fb2
Contemporary
  • Author:
    Patrick. McCabe
  • ISBN:
    0330391615
  • ISBN13:
    978-0330391610
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Picador (2001).; First Edition edition (2001)
  • Pages:
    384 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Contemporary
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1475 kb
  • ePUB format
    1366 kb
  • DJVU format
    1555 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    202
  • Formats:
    txt docx azw doc


Other books by patrick mccabe.

Other books by patrick mccabe.

Emerald Germs of Ireland. 384pp, Picador, £1. 9. His neighbours dismiss him as "a complete and utter oddity", but if you're a Patrick McCabe fan you'll recognise the main character of his latest novel. Pat has been around since The Butcher Boy as abused son, bullied schoolboy, village scarecrow or anarchist, the bright-enough child beaten into the darkness of his own bent imagination by the cruelty of dysfunctional parents and an uncaring community

Emerald Germs of Ireland is, in essence, Pat McNab’s post-matricide year. This is another great romp from the master of black comedy. Patrick McCabe was born in Clones, County Monaghan, Ireland in 1955

Emerald Germs of Ireland is, in essence, Pat McNab’s post-matricide year. Patrick McCabe was born in Clones, County Monaghan, Ireland in 1955. He is the author of the children’s story The Adventures of Shay Mouse, and the novels Music on Clinton Street, Carn, The Butcher Boy (winner of the Irish Times/Aer Lingus Literature Prize and shortlisted for the 1992 Booker Prize), The Dead School, Breakfast on Pluto (shortlisted for the 1998 Booker Prize), Mondo Desperando, Emerald Germs of Ireland.

and the relationship one might contrive with the ineluctable modality of the visible that if we were to go into it here in terms of attempting to understand Pat and how it affected his life around. this time, it is likely that we would be expostulating until the proverbial kingdom come.

Emerald Germs of Ireland (2001) is a black comedy novel by Irish writer Patrick McCabe. Each chapter is begun with an Irish folk song. The book focuses on the life of Gullytown homeboy Pat McNab, the village idiot. The alternately adoring and criticizing attention by his mother, Maimie and the total abusiveness of his father finally send him over the edge. Patrick McCabe, Emerald Germs of Ireland. Thank you for reading books on GrayCity. Pat McNab is a 45 year old guy who lives (or I should say "lived") with his mother. I get giddy when I hear Patrick McCabe has a new book coming out. For years now, ever since by chance I was browsing in a book store and caught a glimpse of the interesting looking cover of a single, obscure copy of a novel called The Butcher Boy, I have been wrapped up as a huge fan. His subsequent books, The Dead School, Breakfast on Pluto, Mondo Desperado and now this, The Emerald Germs of Ireland, have all been wonderful.

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бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. "e;There is something special about the relationship we all have with our mothers. e;Meet Pat McNab, forty-five years old, and about to embark on a homicidal rampage sparked by matricide

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. e;Meet Pat McNab, forty-five years old, and about to embark on a homicidal rampage sparked by matricide. Or is he?Pat spent endless hours chain-smoking and propping up the counter of Sullivan's Select Bar (not that Mrs. McNab knew anything about itshe and Timmy the barman didn't get along at all) or sitting on his mother's knee singing away together like some ridiculous two-headed human jukebox.


Buzatus
You get the point of the story in the first 50 pages then it is just repeated in strange attempts at surrealism (or something). Reads like it was written by a 7th grader.
Fog
Not McCabe's best work.
Joni_Dep
OK... this is my first exposure to Patrick McCabe, and it's because I was at the library and just happened to pick this up... Emerald Germs of Ireland. It's a rather dark, morbid story, but one that I found strangely fascinating...

Pat McNab is a 45 year old guy who lives (or I should say "lived") with his mother. She's a domineering sort, and Pat was raised in a somewhat feminine fashion. But one day he cracks and ends up killing his mother by "blunt force trauma". To cover up the crime, he buries her out in the backyard. Of course, the small Irish town he lives in notices her absence, and Pat explains it away as her having left to do some traveling. That matricide event starts the unraveling of what's left of his sanity, and also starts a series of murders (and garden additions) needed to prevent others from "discovering" his previous crime. You're never quite sure what's real and what's not in his world, but it's best not to become part of it...

Many books like this would paint everything in a dark, sinister fashion. McCabe goes more for the comically absurd, and slowly paints a picture of McNab's background with each new encounter. While the subject matter isn't something you'd find funny, I couldn't help but laugh at some of the scenes that he painted for the reader. And once the magical mushrooms were introduced, you really didn't have a clue as to where things were going (or what was real vs. imagined). I'm intrigued enough to put him on my list of authors I need to catch up on...
Zainian
I get giddy when I hear Patrick McCabe has a new book coming out. For years now, ever since by chance I was browsing in a book store and caught a glimpse of the interesting looking cover of a single, obscure copy of a novel called The Butcher Boy, I have been wrapped up as a huge fan. His subsequent books, The Dead School, Breakfast on Pluto, Mondo Desperado and now this, The Emerald Germs of Ireland, have all been wonderful. This is a clever, brilliant lingual writer with a harsh comprehension of Irish, American, ethnic and other sorts of English slang as well as a gorgeous, modifed and tightly retrained knowledge of moving and hilarious storytelling.
Each book by McCabe is a string of adjectives: brilliant, wonderful, funny, tragic, sad, moving, joyous, inventive, imaginative, amazing, heart-rending and silly. The Emerald Germs of Ireland is more of the same. It's a bit more difficult a read than his previous works, frequently going off into the surrealistic and understandable incomprehensible delusions of the protagonist, but you quickly get used to this so transfixed are you by what might or might not be happening next. This is both the saddest and funniest of McCabe's always sad and funny books and no author I have ever read (honestly!) has even been able to merge such suffering with such hilarious 'they-deserve-it--Good!' reactions from the reader.
This is another masterpiece by an author seemingly only capable of writing masterpieces. McCabe is not the sort of author I smilingly recommend to friends, but the type of obsessively beloved writer I urge, push, force and demand they read. I leave off doing the same to you . . .
Arlana
If you've never read a Patrick McCabe book before, you're much better off starting with The Butcher Boy, The Dead School, or Mondo Desperado.
Emerald Germs of Ireland is fine, but it doesn't have the wonderful stream of consciousness style of The Butcher Boy, or the riveting plot of The Dead School. In The Butcher Boy, McCabe adeptly paints exactly how Francie's world unravels. The things that happen to him are not out of the ordinary, but because of how he experiences them, they drive him mad, and the lyrical genius of that novel compounds it. There is an amazing exploration of mother-son relationships in The Dead School, and it fits into a complex theme of how a mother's actions effect whether her son will see women (and the rest of the world, for that matter) as basically safe or basically dangerous.
In Emerald Germs, however, Pat's mother is already dead, and he's already on an "American Psycho" type rampage, which deprives us of McCabe's marvelous character development and illustrations of shifting psychological states. The only interesting parts of the book are Pat's nightmares, and even they seem like the author's attempts to rewrite "Psycho" with only slight variations. We never get any sign at all about why McNab is a murderer, and what's more, we don't even care all that much.
Overall, I feel like McCabe was really slacking off on this book. He'll probably do well on book sales given how amazing his earlier works were, but this just doesn't deserve the attention. If you love Pat McCabe, and he wowed you with his other stories and novels, don't buy this -- you'll be disappointed.
Cells
After reading "Breakfast on Pluto" and not liking it,I thought I'd try something else by McCabe.I soon found this was much the same kind of writing ;I plodded to page 180 ,then packed it in. If dark,troubled,tortured,twisted and morose fiction that doesn't seem to go anywhere is what one enjoys; there's pleanty of it here.I note that other reviewers have rated it very high or very low;which to me doesn't say that it was good or bad ;but that some liked it while others didn't.This can often be determined rather quickly by opening a book and reading a couple of pages at random.