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by Richard Ford
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Contemporary
  • Author:
    Richard Ford
  • ISBN:
    1860461719
  • ISBN13:
    978-1860461712
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    The Harvill Press; New Ed edition (1996)
  • Pages:
    384 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Contemporary
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1645 kb
  • ePUB format
    1327 kb
  • DJVU format
    1315 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    917
  • Formats:
    lrf txt docx azw


Used availability for Richard Ford's The Sportswriter.

Used availability for Richard Ford's The Sportswriter. May 1998 : USA Hardback.

Publisher : The Harvill Press. Authors : Ford, Richard. Product Category : Books. item 7 Sportswriter (Harvill Panther) by Ford, Richard Paperback Book The Cheap Fast -Sportswriter (Harvill Panther) by Ford, Richard Paperback Book The Cheap Fast

Publisher : The Harvill Press. item 7 Sportswriter (Harvill Panther) by Ford, Richard Paperback Book The Cheap Fast -Sportswriter (Harvill Panther) by Ford, Richard Paperback Book The Cheap Fast.

The Sportswriter is a 1986 novel by Richard Ford, and the first of four books of fiction to feature the protagonist Frank Bascombe. In The Sportswriter, Bascombe is portrayed as a failed novelist turned sportswriter who undergoes an existential crisis following the death of his son. The sequel to The Sportswriter is the Pulitzer Prize-winning Independence Day, published in 1995

I tried reading Richard Ford’s The Sportswriter years ago, but I wasn’t ready. This is too bad, given my complete lack of interest in sports or sportswriting

I tried reading Richard Ford’s The Sportswriter years ago, but I wasn’t ready. This is too bad, given my complete lack of interest in sports or sportswriting. Richard Ford himself has been a sportswriter but he has not been the father of a dead child, so one starts to think he’s not so much describing a man who’s numb with tragedy as glossing over something he doesn’t know shit about. Instead of facing tragedy, Frank has awkward conversations with other sad middle-aged men about their stunted lives.

Manufacturer: The Harvill Press Release date: 4 July 1996 ISBN-10 : 1860461719 ISBN-13: 9781860461712. add. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york. Please select Production or behind the scenes photos Concept artwork Cover CD/DVD/Media scans Screen capture/Screenshot.

Home Richard Ford The Sportswriter. The sportswriter, . For the past fourteen years I have lived here at 19 Hoving Road, Haddam, New Jersey, in a large Tudor house bought when a book of short stories I wrote sold to a movie producer for a lot of money, and seemed to set my wife and me and our three children-two of whom were not even born yet-up for a. good life.

1986 1 My name is Frank Bascombe. For the past fourteen years I have lived here at 19 Hoving Road, Haddam, New Jersey, in a large Tudor house bought when a book of. 1. My name is Frank Bascombe.

Richard Ford (born February 16, 1944) is an American novelist and short story writer. His best-known works are the novel The Sportswriter and its sequels, Independence Day, The Lay of the Land and Let Me Be Frank With You, and the short story collection Rock Springs, which contains several widely anthologized stories. His novel Wildlife was adapted into a 2018 film of the same name.

com: THE SPORTSWRITER. Frank Bascombe, Ford's protagonist, clings to his almost villainous despair in a way that Walker Percy's men don't, but the book is heavily influenced by Ford's fellow southerner nonetheless

com: THE SPORTSWRITER. Shipping & Handling by region. Frank Bascombe, Ford's protagonist, clings to his almost villainous despair in a way that Walker Percy's men don't, but the book is heavily influenced by Ford's fellow southerner nonetheless.

I know about you, old tricky. I was thinking about Candid Camera. I think that’s about the funniest thing I’ve ever seen in my life.


Rivik
The first of Richard Ford’s Frank Bascombe trilogy creates the pleasures of a thoroughly realistic interiority. Frank Bascombe is a divorced writer. He has lost a son and his marriage quickly disintegrated. Giving up his ambitions as a literary writer he has opted for the route of money and comfort as a sportswriter. He aimlessly drifts in observation; of women, of his “divorced men’s club”; and perhaps most of all, the sleepy town of Haddam, NJ. While Ford’s exploration of this finely developed character is beautiful, at times heroic, one gets the feeling of a novelist in the tradition of American transcendentalism striving all too forcefully to be “wise.”
Pipet
I am starting this review after having recently finished the 4th of the 4 Frank Bascombe books... all Kindle. My regular reading tends to gravitate to detective, cop, secret agent (Harry Bosch, John Wells etc.). Intrigued by a NYT review, and the idea of trying something different, I dove in. So let me say.... Start here. read the books in order. (I was not interested in stopping between volume to write reviews...) The writing is superb, the characters come off as real people, with real experiences and real problems, real successes and failures. Saying that... there is an definite undercurrent of quirkiness. I was never bored. You'll be challenged to consider how you're feeling about what you're reading... What's going on....
Yayrel
Frank is a divorced sportswriter whose life appears to have no direction. Easter weekend appears to be a turning point between his old life and his new.

This book was just dreary to me. At times the language is beautiful and powerful. This though couldn't make up for the overall depressing feeling I got while reading. As well, the tone is very one note. The pace is very slow and steady, with no change throughout the story. This one note narrative style had me feeling a bit dazed and stopped me from feeling any real connection to the character or the story.
Lyrtois
I've meant to read Richard Ford for a while, a long while. An anecdote about Ford in a magazine finally inspired me to start the Frank Bascombe trilogy. In the recounting, Ford and his wife find themselves lost searching for a restaurant. His wife, as most wives are wont to do, suggests he might seek directions. Ford, however, theorizes lack of booze as his problem, which he solves by locating a liquor store, purchasing a bottle of Wild Turkey, and finding the restaurant nearby. Now, I ask you, how can you resist a fellow given to such impeccable deductive reasoning?

Frank Bascombe, too, is quite a fellow, a bit out of the ordinary for the very fact that few of us have what many would consider a really cool guy job: sportswriter for a national publication. However, in many ways he represents the epitome of many men of a certain age, men who have suffered disappointment at how their lives have turned out, who have seen their ambitions frustrated, who have failed at marriage, who have settled for a job, and, worst of all, have lost a child. These men have learned, as Frank has, much of life just happens to you. Yet, in spite of life dropping down on them, many, probably most, mirror Frank in remaining optimistic.

THE SPORTWRITER is more journey than story, or at least one with a neat plot, over a fateful Easter weekend. And more an excursion in the mind of Frank Bascombe, who mulls over pretty much every experience he has or had: his failure as a serious writer, his settling for sports writing, his divorce, the death of a his young son, his girlfriend, a fellow divorced man who kisses him, kills himself, and leaves a letter for Frank, his encounter with a less than happy crippled football player, his girlfriend's family, his breakup with his girlfriend, his hitting on a young Dartmouth new hire at the magazine who views him as a legend of sorts.

And at the end of the journey, what does it all add up to? It adds up to coming to terms with your life as best you can and carrying on.

Younger readers might enjoy following along with Frank Bascombe. But those who smart from a few dinks are the real audience. You also may find the story goes down a little easier with a Wild Turkey or two; you know, to help you wend your way through Frank's mind. And if you discover yourself lost or maybe unfocused from the booze, Frank does you the favor of summing up at the end.

Recommended for people of a certain age, especially those at an inflection point in their lives, as is Frank, and who don't mind a bit of frustration in the company of an exasperating guy.
Ucantia
If Ford's goal was to have me loathe the main character, sportswriter Frank Bascombe, then he failed. I was too bored with the book - a rather poor Updike knock-off - to really care about the man after about five chapters. About the only thing that kept my interest was the fact that the story pivots around a man from Coshocton, Ohio who believes Frank is his best friend while Frank views him a a minor acquaintance. The man's name is Walter Luckett. In real life, Walter Luckett was a brief basketball phenom at Ohio University who ended up on the cover of Sports Illustrated in 1973. It appears from a distance that Richard Ford researched southern and eastern Ohio and pulled this name from that association, which is either clever or a little too cute. Either way, when you're reduced to references to Coshocton to keep you going on with the book, that's not a good sign.
Ishnjurus
This book is a book club selection and since our club meets tomorrow, it had to be finished tonight. I did not like this book because the protagonist is such a dreary character. All through the story I kept thinking how fortunate it was that someone like this hadn't entered my life. The only decent philosophical question this book presented was how individual lives can change instantly. This includes what is done, jobs, lovers, friends, health, location, etc. We live an ever-changing life. This is an old but interesting premise. It is too bad the main character has no moorings to anything beyond sex and imagining himself living a different life with a different person. It's as though everyone else in the world is only a prop.