» » Oh! where are Bloody Mary's earrings?: A mystery story at the Court of Queen Victoria

Download Oh! where are Bloody Mary's earrings?: A mystery story at the Court of Queen Victoria fb2

by Robert Player
Download Oh! where are Bloody Mary's earrings?: A mystery story at the Court of Queen Victoria fb2
Contemporary
  • Author:
    Robert Player
  • ISBN:
    0575014296
  • ISBN13:
    978-0575014299
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Gollancz; First Edition edition (1972)
  • Pages:
    228 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Contemporary
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1234 kb
  • ePUB format
    1721 kb
  • DJVU format
    1260 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    580
  • Formats:
    azw txt docx rtf


A mystery set in the court of Queen Victoria . Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Oh! Where are Bloody Mary's earrings? as Want to Read

A mystery set in the court of Queen Victoria . Start by marking Oh! Where are Bloody Mary's earrings? as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

They started out as gifts from Philip of Spain to Bloody Mary. Later, they ended up on the Tudor Tiara (kept with the other Crown Jewels in the Tower) designed by Prince Albert for Queen Victoria.

Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was the queen of England and Ireland from July 1553 until her death

Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was the queen of England and Ireland from July 1553 until her death. She is best known for her vigorous attempt to reverse the English Reformation, which had begun during the reign of her father, Henry VIII. She restored to the Church some of the property taken from it in the previous two reigns

Answer: Mary Tudor, or Queen Mary I, was called Bloody . John Foxe, in Chapter XVI of his classic book Acts and Monuments, details many of th. .

Answer: Mary Tudor, or Queen Mary I, was called Bloody Mary because of her intense persecution of Protestants during her short reign. Mary Tudor lived in the first half of the 1500s, daughter to King Henry VIII and his first wife, Catherine of Aragon. Mary Tudor was declared a bastard child at the age of seventeen and deprived of her former luxuries as princess. Anne Boleyn bore Henry a daughter, the future Elizabeth I; however, by that time, the king was already courting Jane Seymour, a maid of honor to the queen. John Foxe, in Chapter XVI of his classic book Acts and Monuments, details many of the executions carried out by Bloody Mary.

Bloody Mary is a ghost or witch featured in Western folklore. She is also confused in some tellings of the story with Mary Queen of Scots. She is said to appear in a mirror when her name is called three times (or sometimes more, depending upon the version of the story), often as part of a game at slumber parties. Other very similar tales use different names for the character including Mary Worth, Mary Worthington, and Hell Mary among others.

Mary Tudor, Mary I, nicknamed by her enemies as Bloody Mary, was the third . The story goes that Mary refused the proposal of Edward Courtenay, the Earl of Devon as she apparently fell madly in love while looking.

Mary Tudor, Mary I, nicknamed by her enemies as Bloody Mary, was the third woman to hold the throne of England. She is often remembered for trying to counter the religious reforms introduced by her father, the famous King Henry VIII and subjecting England once again to the pope's authority. Soon after she took the throne, Queen Mary turned her focus to finding a husband. The story goes that Mary refused the proposal of Edward Courtenay, the Earl of Devon as she apparently fell madly in love while looking at a portrait of the then Prince Philip II of Spain, son of her first cousin the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V.

Redirected from Queen victoria). Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837 until her death. On 1 May 1876, she adopted the additional title of Empress of India. Known as the Victorian era, her reign of 63 years and seven months was longer than that of any of her predecessors

England's Mary I, who authorised the burning at the stake of nearly 300 Protestants, as well as the execution of her predecessor Lady Jane Grey, "the nine days queen".

England's Mary I, who authorised the burning at the stake of nearly 300 Protestants, as well as the execution of her predecessor Lady Jane Grey, "the nine days queen". Asked in Entertainment & Arts. Where is Mary worth's grave at? i dont know she was bloody mary not mary worth :) but if you say "bloody mary,bloody mary,bloody mary with candles SHE WILL COME. Asked in History of England, Monarchy, Plural Nouns.

Over the next three years, hundreds of Protestants were burned at the stake.

Mary was born at Greenwich on 18 February 1516, the only surviving child of Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon. Her life was radically altered when Henry divorced Catherine to marry Anne Boleyn. Over the next three years, hundreds of Protestants were burned at the stake. This provoked disillusionment with Mary, deepened by an unsuccessful war against France which led to the loss of Calais, England's last possession in France, in January 1558. Childless, sick and deserted by Philip, Mary died on 17 November 1558.

At the time of her death, Queen Victoria was Britain's longest-reigning . Here is where Victoria's instructions for what should be placed in her coffin become a little complex.

At the time of her death, Queen Victoria was Britain's longest-reigning monarch. She'd lived a life full of responsibilities, loves, and intrigues. According to author Tony Rennell, a Reid family descendant wrote a book on the doctor and his famous patient, but the contents of the secret instructions were forbidden by the Royal College censors.


Phain
I've read it several times, but lost my last copy and had to have another one. Thanks
Jorius
This is a cute little comic novel about a pair of very valuable earrings that have disappeared. Or have they? They started out as gifts from Philip of Spain to Bloody Mary. Later, they ended up on the Tudor Tiara (kept with the other Crown Jewels in the Tower) designed by Prince Albert for Queen Victoria. There are some great scenes of royal protocol in Windsor Castle. We get lots of description detailing the rooms and furniture and meals and art objects. Prince Bertie becomes a central character, since he has money troubles and would like to pawn the earrings to a Rothschild, if only he could be assured the earrings are real, which they apparently aren't. Queen Victoria appears with all of her flaws and seems to know more than she lets on to her staff.

I enjoyed trying to figure out who might have replaced the real diamonds with good paste copies, but there was no way for me to anticipate the truth revealed in the final chapter. A lot of people covet these valuable diamonds, so there are a lot of suspects. The ending is very satisfying. This is a funny novel with lots of historical detail. There's even a bibliography, which one usually doesn't find with comic historical fiction. My only trouble was with a couple of passages written in lower-class London dialect that I had trouble deciphering. This would make a cute Masterpiece Theatre miniseries. I can fully recommend it if you want some easy reading for pure diversion.