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by Ralph Gladstone,Barbara Wright,Alfred Jarry
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Contemporary
  • Author:
    Ralph Gladstone,Barbara Wright,Alfred Jarry
  • ISBN:
    1878972251
  • ISBN13:
    978-1878972255
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Exact Change (September 30, 2009)
  • Pages:
    160 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Contemporary
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1436 kb
  • ePUB format
    1417 kb
  • DJVU format
    1918 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    196
  • Formats:
    lit doc rtf txt


I really like Alfred Jarry. although right now it's discounted pretty heavily here.

I really like Alfred Jarry. The Supermale" is fun, but despite being by Jarry it's actually much more conventional in the ideas and devices (pun intended) used than, say, in Dr. Faustroll or in the Ubu Plays

by Alfred Jarry · Ralph Gladstone · Barbara Wright. An anthology of previously untranslated texts by Alfred Jarry beginning with his first work, Black Minutes of Memorial Sand.

by Alfred Jarry · Ralph Gladstone · Barbara Wright. With the very first word of his famous play Ubu Roi--Shite!--Alfred Jarry (1873-1907) threw down his challenge to literature, permanently altering its course thereafter. Included are theoretical texts, aberrant journalism, and highly-wrought Symbolist poems; a practical guide to building a time mach. Exploits and Opinions of Dr. Faustroll, Pataphysician. by Alfred Jarry · Roger Shattuck · Simon Watson Taylor.

Alfred Jarry, Ralph Gladstone (Translator). Barbara Wright (Translator)

Alfred Jarry, Ralph Gladstone (Translator). Barbara Wright (Translator).

Alfred Jarry, eccentric dramatist, poet, and humorist, was born in Laval, France, in 1873. Jarry is perhaps best known for the satirical and farcical play Ubu Roi (King Ubu), the first in a series of Ubu plays, published in 1896. He was the co-founder, with Remy de Gourmont in 1894, of the magazine L'ymagier, which literally translated is "the maker of prints. This magazine, in existence only two years, presented texts and art images from a number of literary avant-garde artists of the late 19th century. Jarry died in 1907 in Paris. Barbara Wright, a novelist and screenwriter,.

Alfred Jarry (French: ; 8 September 1873 – 1 November 1907) was a French symbolist writer who is best known for his play Ubu Roi (1896), a pataphysical work which depicts the bourgeoisie as the super-mediocre

Alfred Jarry (French: ; 8 September 1873 – 1 November 1907) was a French symbolist writer who is best known for his play Ubu Roi (1896), a pataphysical work which depicts the bourgeoisie as the super-mediocre. He coined the term and philosophical concept of pataphysics, which uses absurd irony to portray symbolic truths (and playfully vice versa).

Alfred Jarry, Barbara Wright. Ralph Gladstone, Barbara Wright. With the very first word of his famous play Ubu Roi-"Shite!"-Alfred Jarry (1873-1907) threw down his challenge to literature, permanently altering its course thereafter. Like a mock Jules Verne, Jarry describes these deranged proceedings in a calm prose, crisply rendered here by Barbara Wright, one of French literature's finest translators. Издание: перепечатанное, иллюстрированное.

Alfred Jarry (1873-1907) was the original transgressive author; the first word of his famous play Ubu Roi - Shittr! - changed the course of art and drama . Translated by Ralph Gladstone and Barbara Wright. Introduction by Barbara Wright.

Alfred Jarry (1873-1907) was the original transgressive author; the first word of his famous play Ubu Roi - Shittr! - changed the course of art and drama forever. ISBN13:9780811206334.

Alfred Jarry, Ralph Gladstone, Barbara Wright.

Items related to The SUPERMALE. Text) Gladstone, Ralph & Wright, Barbara. Bibliographic Details. Title: The SUPERMALE. Publisher: New Directions, New York. Publication Date: 1977. Published by New Directions, New York, 1977. Condition: Fine Hardcover.

Translated by Ralph Gladstone and Barbara Wright.

With the very first word of his famous play Ubu Roi--"Shite!"--Alfred Jarry (1873-1907) threw down his challenge to literature, permanently altering its course thereafter. Jarry's equally revolutionary novels form the cornerstones of a science he named "Pataphysics," a method for the rational disordering of rationality that has influenced countless subsequent artists and writers, from Marcel Duchamp to Wim Delvoye, André Breton to J.G. Ballard. The Supermale elaborates a carnal Pataphysics: André Marcueil, gentleman and scientist, believes that human energy has no limits, and demonstrates his belief by undertaking a 10,000-mile bicycle race with a locomotive, followed by an indefinite bout of lovemaking. After 82 acts of intercourse, doctors finally hook him up to a machine, with whom he merges in the book's--and the Supermale's--final climax. Like a mock Jules Verne, Jarry describes these deranged proceedings in a calm prose, crisply rendered here by Barbara Wright, one of French literature's finest translators.

POFOD
I was so grateful to finally find Alfred Jarry's last novel "The Supermale" back in print in English! Less famous than his just-as-obnoxious and just-as-hilarious dramatic work UBO ROI, this phallic obsessed dark little tale is chock full of obscenities, mechanized eroticism, and touches of compassion for a world sorely lacking in true love.
Braned
If the Marquis de Sade, having abandoned his steadygoing Cartesianism for the monistic mechanicism of Spinoza, had decided to interpolate 'Philosophy in the Boudoir' with passages from 'Around the World in 80 Days', you would get something rather similar to this outstanding novel. Like all of Jarry's books, it's an inexhaustible dynamo. If you love Raymond Roussel and Marcel Duchamp, this is the novel for you.
TheFresh
Great doO doo. Book doo doo for the record this book is not foo foo. It toPs lIke pops me moPs!
Chilele
Our protagonist Andre Marcueil had grand ideas...so grand that his "Everyday ordinariness became extraordinary."

Andre firmly believes that human capacity has no limits. He believed it so fervently that he would risk his life in a ten-thousand mile race with a steam locomotive at speeds greater than 300 miles per hour with no rest and no sustenance, save the cubes of perpetual motion food, then to copulate with the same woman 82 times in twenty-four hours, and to recharge an electric chair designed to produce love.

Braggadocio? Maybe, or maybe his futuristic ideas held something of substance, something an ordinary mind could not possibly grasp hold of. Andrew Marcueil - Hercules, Frankenstein, or Supermale?

The fusion of man and machine is not that uncommon a theme, but Jarry takes our protagonist one step further into the surreal, envisioning a better human race, where the age old philosophies of man are not only limited but are pointless idiocies. The self-inflicted trials and tribulations our protagonist endures in this story are beyond reason and ultimately absurd. But for all the absurdity, it is the story of a man's search for himself - a better self. 1920, a time of great change in the world, the dawn of the modern age, Jarry brings into question how humans can take the manifestations of their minds and thrust them into reality, and yet, with all the trinkets and machines our genius minds invent, none of them seem to better us as people.

Above all, discretely woven into this tale is a love story, a heart wrenching sad love story. And what of love? Could someone as cruel and heartless as our protagonist actually love? Love being something beyond infinite and ungraspable - a shadow. "The act of love is of no importance, since if can be performed indefinitely." For our protagonist, love is an absurdity...a sentiment...not quite and act...more of an enfeebled sensation. In order find love, one must understand God. Would Andre ever understand...could he understand? Could he see God in himself, even though his egotistical mania filled him with the belief that he actually was God. Even Jarry himself had his doubts: "If nothing is sacred and everything is absurd and meaningless, the logical conclusion is self-annihilation." Jarry was not far from the truth, even then. Love is not a means to an end - it is the end in itself, for without it, no matter how many contraptions we strap to our backs, we will perish. We are the only machines that have the capacity to generate love, and in that lies the truth: The human capacity for love is limitless.

Jarry's prose is eloquent and refined...a delicate balance of theorem and conjecture without the loss of poetry. Surrealist and Sci-Fi fans alike will be pleased with the implications of this story.
Onoxyleili
I really like Alfred Jarry. That said, I think that while "The Supermale" is a decent book, it isn't exactly a masterpiece, and that if you're just getting into Jarry's world there are probably better books to spend your money on....although right now it's discounted pretty heavily here.

"The Supermale" is fun, but despite being by Jarry it's actually much more conventional in the ideas and devices (pun intended) used than, say, in Dr. Faustroll or in the Ubu Plays. It's also more of a novella, with two or three main scenes, albeit long ones, rather than an actual novel.
Beazezius
One often takes French proto-surrealist literature with a grain (or spoonful) of salt, perhaps due to the hollow stigma which Breton and others rendered the word 'surrealism.' This novel by the maniac Jarry was a helpful reminder that he and Apollinaire and a few others were really getting at something compelling. Jarry's Supermale is an hyperbolic monster of masculinity, riding 10000 miles on a bicycle at the speed of a locomotive to proclaim his desire for a certain woman, with which woman he proceeds, in order to prove a point, to copulate a total of 82 times in 24 hours. However, Andre Marceuil is clearly a self-portrait; descriptions of him read uncannily closely to Jarry's own physiognomy. Marceuil is a man intent on living his art, without pretentions or assistance. The sex that occupies the latter 40 pages of this rather short novel (80 pages total) is surprisingly sensitive and crazy, especially during a launch into a poetic hymn to Helen of Troy. Altogether a touching and inspirational nugget of strange virtuosity. Read it and regain your faith in the true surrealism. (if you have lost it.)