Download The Spy fb2

by James Fenimore Cooper
Download The Spy fb2
Contemporary
  • Author:
    James Fenimore Cooper
  • ISBN:
    1420942735
  • ISBN13:
    978-1420942736
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Digireads.com (January 1, 2011)
  • Pages:
    246 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Contemporary
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1364 kb
  • ePUB format
    1411 kb
  • DJVU format
    1920 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    934
  • Formats:
    lrf doc txt lrf


James fenimore cooper. I believe I could write a better story myself!" With these words, sincebecome famous, James Fenimore Cooper laid aside the English novel whichhe was reading aloud to his wife.

James fenimore cooper. A few days later he submitted severalpages of manuscript for her approval, and then settled down to the taskof making good his boast. In November, 1820, he gave the public a novelin two volumes, entitled Precaution

The Spy: a Tale of the Neutral Ground was James Fenimore Cooper's second novel, published in 1821 by Wiley & Halsted.

The Spy: a Tale of the Neutral Ground was James Fenimore Cooper's second novel, published in 1821 by Wiley & Halsted. This was the earliest American novel to win wide and permanent fame and may be said to have begun the type of romance which dominated . fiction for 30 years. The action takes place during the American Revolution, at "The Locusts", which is believed to have been the real family home of John Jay in Rye, Westchester County, New York (known today as the Jay Estate).

James Fenimore Cooper's second novel, The Spy (1821), is based on Sir Walter Scott's Waverly series, and tells an adventure tale about the American Revolution. The protagonist is Harvey Birch, a supposed loyalist who actually is a spy for George Washington, disguised as 'Mr Harper. The book brought Cooper fame and wealth, and is regarded as the first great success in American fiction. Summary by Gord MacKenzie).

James Fenimore Cooper (September 15, 1789 – September 14, 1851) was an American writer of the first half of the 19th century

James Fenimore Cooper (September 15, 1789 – September 14, 1851) was an American writer of the first half of the 19th century. His historical romances depicting frontier and Native American life from the 17th to the 19th centuries created a unique form of American literature. He lived much of his boyhood and the last fifteen years of life in Cooperstown, New York, which was founded by his father William on property that he owned.

LibriVox recording of The Spy, by James Fenimore Cooper The book brought Cooper fame and wealth, and is regarded as the first great success.

LibriVox recording of The Spy, by James Fenimore Cooper. James Fenimore Cooper's second novel, The Spy (1821), is based on Sir Walter Scott's Waverly series, and tells an adventure tale about the American Revolution. The protagonist is Harvey Birch, a supposed loyalist who actually is a spy for George Washington, disguised as "Mr. Harper.

The Spy & Lionel Lincoln. James Fenimore Cooper. James Fenimore Cooper James Fenimore Cooper. It is a strong proof of the diffusive tendency of every thing in this country, that America never yet collected a fleet. Nothing is wanting to this display of power but the will. Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos.

Check out The Spy from American literary master James Fenimore Cooper.

Cooper, James Fenimore, 1789-1851) La Spia (The Spy): A Grand Opera in Three Acts (libretto in Italian and English, with piano arrangements of selected portions; New York.

Cooper, James Fenimore, 1789-1851). Cooper, James Fenimore, 1789-1851: Afloat and Ashore: A Sea Tale (New York: J. G. Gregory, 1864) (page images at MOA). Cooper, James Fenimore, 1789-1851: El Último de los Mohicanos (novel text in English, notes in Spanish; Boston et al: . Heath and C. c1915), contrib. by John G. Wight and Helen M. Parkhurst. La Spia (The Spy): A Grand Opera in Three Acts (libretto in Italian and English, with piano arrangements of selected portions; New York: J. Darcie, c1856), by Luigi Arditi and Filippo Manetta (page images at HathiTrust).

James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851) was a prolific and popular American writer of the early 19th century. He is best remembered as a novelist who wrote numerous historical novels and sea-stories. In his lifetime he published thirty-three extensive fictional works, three books of explicit social and political commentary, five travel works, a monumental history of the United States Navy, a book of naval biographies, and a remarkable amount of miscellaneous writing. His audacious experimentation with original literary materials exerted a powerful influential effect on the literature of the young Republic. Written in 1821, "The Spy" takes place during the heart of the American Revolution in 1780 on the neutral grounds of Westchester County, New York. The protagonist, Harvey Birch, is an American spy wrongly suspected by Patriots to be a spy for the British. Harvey helps a family who is torn apart by the war, while he himself has to avoid both the Continental Army and American guerrillas. The book incorporates several real characters, including George Washington, who offers Harvey a reward at the end of the war.

Nirn
First ran across this book in a college course many years ago. Skimmed it at the time, but revisited it a decade or so later and really enjoyed it. I now read it at least every two years. The Spy is a very significant book in that it was, arguably, the first well-received novel about America written by an American author. The florid prose can be tedious, although the reading gets easier with time. For example, it takes Cooper the first page and one-half to basically state "it was a dark and stormy night," but the observations and descriptions make it very interesting, if somewhat laborious. Over all, the book is a great read, and it offers a snapshot of life in the Revolutionary War period that history books just can't. To begin his own literary "revolution," Cooper, in an effort to attract female readers, takes great pains to describe clothing and furnishings in minute detail. This doesn't serve to advance the plot much, but it does provide a vivid picture of the times. Another new feature is the realistic treatment of the dialogue of the beloved black slave, Caesar. Over one hundred years before Jack Benny's "Rochester," we have Cooper's Caesar providing comic relief with his mispronunciations and equally entertaining colloquialisms. To my knowledge, slaves in novels by earlier authors either spoke with a Harvard accent or not at all.

To wrap this all up, the plot is slow to develop and many of the characters are cliched and predictable. Despite this, the book succeeds in providing an entertaining and even educational read. The actual spy - Harvey Birch - is a complex character who hides behind his simplicity, depending on the situation. Also, Cooper's treatment of George Washington really brings the man to life, and it depicts the man, more than the general. The treatment of American patriotism in general is well-done, from multiple standpoints. All-in-all, this book is worth the effort.
Dont_Wory
Considered the first American novel, The Spy tis set during the Revolutionary War in New York State north of the city with skirmishing and forays by the Continentals and British closely following the attempted betrayal of West Point by Benedict Arnold. The Continental Army is taking strict and swift precautions against suspected British spies caught behind their lines.

The main story centers around a British officer, Henry Wharton, from a Tory family in Westchester who visits his family dressed in a civilian disguise. Because of bad weather, he is forced to delay his return to British held territory, is caught, and is held for trial and execution as a spy.

There are also a number of other characters, including the Wharton family, the Peddler, a group of marauders terrorizing the area, and the actual Continental army deployed in this area.

E story held my interest, up until the end I wasn't sure who the actual spy was - it could have been any one of 3 or more characters.

In the end , it turns out to be the most obvious of the characters who, today, we would call a double agent.
Lyrtois
The last time I read a novel by Cooper was as an English major in college when "The Pioneers" was required reading in American novel class. I never thought I'd read another Cooper novel, but after recently reading in a John Jay biography that "The Spy" was based on the true story of a Revolutionary War double-agent spy, I was intrigued enough to give it a try. I was pleasantly surprised. Cooper's style is well-known to be bombastic, but we must keep in mind that he was one of the first genuine American novelists, so I don't think we should be too critical. Actually, at times, Cooper does a wonderful job at descriptive narrative. He has moments when he definitely achieves success in bringing into the mind's eye the vivid natural beauty of the Hudson highlands.The story line was exciting enough that I wanted to find out what happened to the characters, especially to Harvey Birch, the spy. Overall, I liked "The Spy" and I'm glad that I took the time to read it.
Wenyost
This isn't Cooper's best, but it is very good. Harvey Birch, the spy of the title, actually receives less attention in this novel than a few other characters. I wondered at times while reading this why the book was given this title. All in all though, the book is well written and kept my interest to the very end. This book is also worth reading for glimpses of the mood of the colonies during the War of Independence - not everybody was gung-ho for revolution against Britain. There were also low-life parasitic gangs of men nicknamed 'The Skinners' prowling the land stealing and murdering.
Doulkree
Excellent novel of the revolutionary times as experienced in the Hudson Valley. Sympathetic to the adherents of both sides among the colonists, although the British do not come off too well. Despite being written in the elaborate style of the times, and despite some of the characters being a bit too noble for my taste, I found this to be a involving and fascinating book. There are plenty of characters with selfish or mixed motives to balance out the noble ones.

It might be helpful to read a history of the revolution or the Hudson Valley beforehand, as I did, to get a better sense of the background. This edition has a useful introduction, but it is necessarily focused on Cooper and the writing of this book.