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by D Keith Mano
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Contemporary
  • Author:
    D Keith Mano
  • ISBN:
    1564781933
  • ISBN13:
    978-1564781932
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Dalkey Archive Press (September 1, 1998)
  • Pages:
    582 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Contemporary
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1315 kb
  • ePUB format
    1248 kb
  • DJVU format
    1793 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    811
  • Formats:
    rtf txt lit mbr


Before its recent resurrection by Dalkey Archive, D Keith Mano's Take Five had enjoyed only an abbreviated and unheralded shelf life before fading away, largely unnoticed. It had been deemed too vulgar and blasphemous to appeal to conservative readers.

Before its recent resurrection by Dalkey Archive, D Keith Mano's Take Five had enjoyed only an abbreviated and unheralded shelf life before fading away, largely unnoticed. At the same time, it was felt that Mano's overall theme of Christian redemption would put off the majority of more liberal-minded readers.

Take Five (American Literature (Dalkey Archive)). As a result, his narrative (the very book we are reading) turns into a literary "stew": an uproariously funny melange of journal entries, erotic poetry, parodies of all kinds, love letters, interviews, and lists - as Hugh Kenner in Harper's wrote, "for another such virtuoso of the List you'd have to resurrect Joyce". Soon Lamont's characters (on loan from F. Scott Fitzgerald, Flann O'Brien, James Joyce, and Dashiell Hammett) take on lives of their own, completely sabotaging his narrative.

Series: American Literature (Dalkey Archive). Paperback: 956 pages. Publisher: Dalkey Archive Press (February 7, 2012). The journeys taken, and the statements expressed by the characters of this novel reflect the tensions in both of these attitudes, and because of this, and in spite of the massive length of this book, it is worth the time and effort for its perusal. English is of course the predominant mode of expression within the pages of this delectable story, but Hungarian, Spanish, and French make their appearance too, as well as Latin.

David) Keith Mano graduated summa cum laude from Columbia University in 1963. product description page. He spent the next year as a Kellett Fellow in English at Clare College, Cambridge, and toured as an actor with the Marlowe Society of England. He came back to America in 1964 as a Woodrow Wilson Fellow at Columbia. He has appeared in several off-Broadway productions and toured with the National Shakespeare Company. Target/Movies, Music & Books/Books/All Book Genres/Fiction & Literature‎. Take Five - (American Literature (Dalkey Archive)) by D Keith Mano (Paperback).

Keith Mano (Mano, D. Keith). used books, rare books and new books. Find all books by 'D. Keith Mano' and compare prices Find signed collectible books by 'D. Keith Mano'. ISBN 9780451061447 (978-0-451-06144-7) Softcover, Signet, 1974.

Take Five, starring Simon Lynxx, directed by D. Keith Mano. Forget my worthless words. Allow Mr. John O'Brien at Dalkey Archive Press to speak for this lost comic masterpiece of moral fiction. view spoiler)[ V. 7. In which Simon Lynxx awakens with Martha Washington's head and all five senses intact; he surprises a tour group with his 'umongous pecker'; and Alf damages the gorilla suit.

The American Libraries collection includes material contributed from across the United States. Institutions range from the Library of Congress to many local public libraries. court of appeals (district of columbia circuit). department of agriculture.

American Literature Series. Preface by John O'Brien. Welcome to the world of Simon Lynxx and to one of the great overlooked novels of the 1980s. Categories: American Postmodernism, Fiction, Movements and Schools, United States and Canada, United States of America.

American literature is literature written or produced in the United States of America and its preceding colonies (for specific discussions of poetry and theater, see Poetry of the United States and Theater in the United States)

American literature is literature written or produced in the United States of America and its preceding colonies (for specific discussions of poetry and theater, see Poetry of the United States and Theater in the United States). Before the founding of the United States, the British colonies on the eastern coast of the present-day United States were heavily influenced by English literature. The American literary tradition thus began as part of the broader tradition of English literature.

Books By Rikki Ducornet fiction The Butcher’s Tales (short fiction) 1980 The Stain (novel) 1984 Entering Fire (novel) 1986 . The Doctor put it this way: she said I had taken a bite of the poison apple. She chose that apple deliberately.

Books By Rikki Ducornet fiction The Butcher’s Tales (short fiction) 1980 The Stain (novel) 1984 Entering Fire (novel) 1986 The Fountains of Neptune (novel) 1989 The Jade. Knowledge – as much as its denial – had precipitated me headfirst into the land of Nod.

Welcome to the world of Simon Lynxx and to one of the great overlooked novels of the 1980s. Con-man, filmmaker (currently working on producing Jesus 2001, what he calls the religious equivalent of The Godfather), descendent of a wealthy and prestigious New York family whose wealth and prestige are in sharp decline, racist and anti-Semite (though Simon dislikes all ethnic groups equally), possessor of never-satisfied appetites (food, women, drink, but most of all, money and more money), and the fastest talker since Falstaff, Simon is on a quest that goes backwards. Through the course of this 600-page novel, Simon loses, one by one, all of his senses, ending in a state of complete debilitation through which he is being made ready for eternity and possible salvation.

Redfury
"Take Five" is one of those enormously ambitious, endlessly inventive, compulsively readable, yet equally--though not, perhaps, fatally--flawed novels the culminating noble failure of which renders it both a more compelling work and rewarding read than 99% of those so-called successes that, if less flawed, are, by comparison, utterly dwarfish. Which is why Dalkey Archive is to be commended for resurrecting it fully 16 years after its initial publication in the hope of attracting to it the wider audience it failed to attract then, but so clearly deserves now.

A jam-packed, turbo-charged, doorstop-massive, acrobatically entertaining, 3 1/2-star, over-the-top high-wire act, with respect to its voice and aesthetic sensibility the book bears less affinity to the work of William Gaddis, much less James Joyce--the names typically invoked--than to Tom Wolfe or John Irving i.e. it's tres smart and engaging as hell, but it ain't, sorry folks, Art.

While there is little question that the work catches fire--indeed it breathes the stuff, blazes brightly, perhaps too brightly throughout--chiefly owing to the author's similie/metaphor-generating portrayal of its rampaging, scenery-chewing, hyper-articulate, larger-than-life, hyperbolically solipsistic protagonist whose non-stop wisecrackery and over-caffeinated, free-associating DJ patter is over 600 pages akin to being trapped in a broadcast booth with Robin Williams on a cocaine toot, it can be argued that the heat that that fire expresses too often distracts from the light it aspires to give off. Despite the applause its author merits for both his creative risk-taking and expansiveness of vision, the work, finally, fails to transcend itself, to realize that integral organic quality of MORE-ness of purpose that ultimately defines the Real Deal. Which, I suppose, is just a wordier way of saying that the author's reach, which is nothing if not considerable, exceeds his scarcely less considerable grasp.

At last, despite its several estimable qualities, not least of which are its good humor, apparent erudition, and palpable energy, the work must stand or fall on whether one "buys" the character of Simon Lynxx, not only as plausibly or implausibly drawn by his creator, but as the proper or improper vessel for the Christ-figure to which he is reduced--each of his five senses having one by one been destroyed--by story's end. Does the reader, that is, care enough to fully empathize with Simon's extravagant suffering and self-torture, or does that reader find the suffering of such a figure merely insufferable, his torture merely self-indulgent.

"Take Five" is a tour de force. Regrettably, it too often and too transparently huffs, puffs and strains for effect for the performance to be declared other than a brilliant mess.
sunrise bird
Before its recent resurrection by Dalkey Archive, D Keith Mano's Take Five had enjoyed only an abbreviated and unheralded shelf life before fading away, largely unnoticed. It had been deemed too vulgar and blasphemous to appeal to conservative readers. At the same time, it was felt that Mano's overall theme of Christian redemption would put off the majority of more liberal-minded readers. Kudos to the folks at Dalkey for recognizing this novel's inherent value and taking the risk to provide us a second chance at it.
The Christian redemption idea is certainly a valid interpretation of Take Five, actually one that is pretty compelling. I would even concede that it may likely have dominated the author's intentions in the process of writing this book. But an identifying mark of good literature (and Take Five is surely that) lies in its openness to multiple and conflicting readings. I, personally, found nothing in the text that served to commit me to any exclusively Christian understanding of the story. Mr. Mano, wisely, has too much respect for his readers to try to do their thinking for them.
Simon Lynxx is the most high-energy, life-affirming cyclone of a character that I have come across since William Gaddis' JR. He constantly sweeps up both the reader and his supporting cast in his wake as he tilts at the windmills of his imagined betrayals and storms the walls denying him the just rewards of his self-proclaimed genius. In the manic process, he voraciously consumes everything and everyone in his path, and is then puzzled in the aftermath when his subjects' loyalty falls short of his expectations. Simon doesn't always have a clear fix on just exactly what it is that he wants, but finds himself, nevertheless, relentlessly driven by his hyper-awareness that he does want something and that it always seems to be just beyond his reach. His campaign in pursuit of these poorly articulated ends is marked by a series of coitus interrupti, variously literal and metaphorical, adding to his general frustration. His speech is vulgar, profane, and literally laced with a crude brand of bigotry. Because his invective is scattershot and aimed at no particular individual or group of individuals, it becomes apparent after a while that Simon is not a seething volcano of hatred and intolerance, but rather uses his offensiveness as a shield to keep intruders at bay. And to a man rendered so vulnerable by self-loathing, everyone is an intruder. Take Five is first and foremost the well-crafted tale of the humbling transformation and self-discovery of Simon Lynxx, but even more intriguing to me is the author's clever exploration of the nature/nurture controversy as it applies to the formation of Simon's character and the facade behind which he has chosen to hide. Mano offers no conclusive answers here, of course, but he does manage to present the question in a thought-provoking light.
As for the language and insensitive bigotry central to a character for whom we are asked to extend sympathy; well, I suspect that Mr. Mano is just a devoted disciple to the teachings of Father Bruce. Take Five is a wonderfully intelligent and engaging novel. It would be a shame for anyone to overlook the substance D. Keith Mano is offering us, while fretting over issues concerning his style.
Vivaral
After reading this book, I handed it to my very well read brother who said "that is the sadest book I have ever read." It is, and it is not. It is a creative tour-de, like a more restrained and elemental Barthelme. It reminds me (as does the death and life of harry goth) of Confederacy of Dunces...I think Mano is just a brilliant writer.