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by Hoda Barakat
Download The Tiller of Waters (Modern Arabic Writing) fb2
Contemporary
  • Author:
    Hoda Barakat
  • ISBN:
    977424690X
  • ISBN13:
    978-9774246906
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    American University in Cairo Press (March 1, 2002)
  • Pages:
    192 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Contemporary
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1911 kb
  • ePUB format
    1264 kb
  • DJVU format
    1407 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    119
  • Formats:
    txt lrf doc azw


Marilyn Booth received her . hil. in Arabic literature and modern Middle East history from St. Antony's College, Oxford University.

Часто встречающиеся слова и выражения. Marilyn Booth received her . She has translated numerous works of modern Arabic fiction, including The Open Door by Latifa al-Zayyat (AUC Press, 2000), and Leaves of Narcissus by Somaya Ramadan (AUC Press, 2002).

Until I grew accustomed to the writing style, it made it difficult to delve into the story. I think the sentences are written as such to represent weaving the thread of the story, the alternating of the warp and weft in creating fabric. In addition to the writing style, it was sometimes difficult to follow the flow of the story when Niqula jumped back and forth in his recollections along with his present circumstances. Lastly, it surprised and disappointed me that a woman writer would make her adult female characters so shallow and lacking.

hacking the modern: arabic writing in the virtual age. Tarek El-Ariss. and other forms of techno-writing, contemporary Arabic literature is under- going a series of structural and linguistic transformations.

If you've read the book, tell us if you agree with our analysis.

Hoda Barakat is a Lebanese novelist, who was born in Beirut in 1952. Her novels include: The Stone of Laughter (1990), Disciples of Passion (1993), The Tiller of Waters (2000) which won the Naguib Mahfouz Medal for Literature in that year, and My Master and my Lover (2004). She has worked in teaching and journalism and currently lives in France. She has published six novels, two plays, a book of short stories and a book of memoirs, as well as contributing to books written in French. She received the ‘Chevalier de l’Ordre. Her fifth novel The Kingdom of This Earth (2012) reached the IPAF longlist in 2013.

While some modern dictionaries are easier to use and may be appropriate for casual translation, Hans Wehr's dictionary is more thorough and accurate for Modern Standard Arabic. The translations include not just the common denotations of meaning but also the more rarely understood connotations. If you want to understand the nuances of a word in Arabic, read through the whole definition, across the root and all the forms of the word. No other Arabic-English dictionary comes close to this level of detail

writer, novelist, feminist. Hoda Barakat (Arabic: هدى بركات‎) (born 1952) is a Lebanese novelist. The Tiller of Waters, American University in Cairo Press, Cairo, 2001

writer, novelist, feminist. Barakat lived much of her life in Beirut and later moved to Paris, where she now resides. The Tiller of Waters, American University in Cairo Press, Cairo, 2001, ISBN 9789774246906. Disciples of Passion, Syracuse University Press, Syracuse, 2005, ISBN 9780815608332.

The Tiller of Waters book. Hoda Barakat (Arabic: هدى بركات) is an acclaimed Lebanese novelist who lived much of her life in Beirut and later moved to Paris, where she now resides. Her first work Hajar al-Dahik (The Stone of Laughter), is the first Arabic work to have a gay man as its main character.

The Tiller of Waters (Paperback). Hoda Barakat (author), Marilyn Booth (translator). Paperback 192 Pages, Published: 31/10/2004.

The Tiller of Waters, Hoda Barakat. In The Tiller of Waters, Barakat depicts Niqula Mitri, a fabric tradesman who is experiencing hallucinations in war-torn Beirut in the midst of the Lebanese Civil War. Each of Lebanese author Hoda Barakat’s novels revolves around a man situated on the peripheries of society. As Niqula struggles to come to terms with his new, devastating reality, his life story is beautifully interwoven with thousands of years of the human relationship with fabric, from ancient weaving to the history of the Silk Road, thereby lending poetry and grace to Niqula’s own history.

This spellbinding novel narrates the many-layered recollections of a hallucinating man in devastated Beirut. The desolate, almost surreal, urban landscape is enriched by the unfolding of the family sagas of Niqula Mitri and his beloved Shamsa, the Kurdish maid. Mitri reminisces about his Egyptian mother and his father who came back to settle in Beirut after a long stay in Egypt. Both Mitri and his father are textile merchants and see the world through the code of cloth, from the intimacy of linen, velvet, and silk to the most impersonal of synthetics. Shamsa in turn relates her story, the myriad adventures of her parents and grandparents who moved from Iraqi Kurdistan to Beirut. Haunting scenes of pastoral Kurds are juxtaposed against the sedentary decadence of metropolitan residents. Barakat weaves into her sophisticated narrative shreds of scientific discourse about herbal plants and textile crafts, customs and manners of Arabs, Armenians, and Kurds, mythological figures from ancient Greece, Mesopotamia, Phoenicia, and Arabia, the theosophy of the African Dogons and the medieval Byzantines, and historical accounts of the Crusades in the Holy Land and the silk route to China.

JoJosho
A strange book, worth reading with care. Not necessarily to everyone's taste. You keep learning more about the main character through artful revelations up through the very end of the novel.
Arlelond
Having all of the elements in a novel I typically enjoy and having won the Naguib Mahfouz Medal for Literature, I thought for sure this novel would be a good read. There were excellent sections to be sure, but there were a number of negative aspects that deterred from my enjoyment.

First, the writing style seemed to be overly complicated. Here is an example from the book:

`I suffer in agony the more you recount to me, triflingly, heedless, the feeble reasons for your absence, to more perfectly close that void, to preserve it by the very moments of your proximity, a presence that does not brook apology.'

Until I grew accustomed to the writing style, it made it difficult to delve into the story. I think the sentences are written as such to represent weaving the thread of the story, the alternating of the warp and weft in creating fabric.

In addition to the writing style, it was sometimes difficult to follow the flow of the story when Niqula jumped back and forth in his recollections along with his present circumstances.

Lastly, it surprised and disappointed me that a woman writer would make her adult female characters so shallow and lacking. Outside of a few exceptions, they were nothing more than females succumbing to their sexual desires regardless of whether or not it was with their husband and causing pain to the men who loved and desired them.

It is a shame as this type of literature is important in interpreting and understanding the impact of the Lebanese Civil War (1975-1990).

The best sections for me were the recounting of Shamsa's Kurdish roots and her family's journey from Iraq to Beirut; the histories of linen, velvet and silk; and Niqula's survival in the city center during the war although this probably should have been edited to be shorter in some sections.