Download Train to Trieste fb2

by Yelena Shmulenson,Domnica Radulescu
Download Train to Trieste fb2
Contemporary
  • Author:
    Yelena Shmulenson,Domnica Radulescu
  • ISBN:
    1598877380
  • ISBN13:
    978-1598877380
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    HighBridge Audio; Unabridged edition (August 5, 2008)
  • Subcategory:
    Contemporary
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1363 kb
  • ePUB format
    1829 kb
  • DJVU format
    1267 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    193
  • Formats:
    azw doc mobi txt


Train to Trieste: A Novel. Written by Domnica Radulescu I listened to this book on audio, read by Yelena Shmulenson and her thick Yiddish accent definitely adds a lot of atmosphere to the story.

Train to Trieste: A Novel. Written by Domnica Radulescu. Narrated by Yelena Schmulenson. Train to Trieste follows the life of Mona Manoliu starting when she is a teenager in Romania during the reign of dictator Nicolae Ceausescu. Times are hard, there are food shortages and restrictions everywhere, and people live in fear and suspicion. However, life goes on, and in the midst of the fear and deprivation Mona falls in love for the first time with a mysterious boy named Mihai. I listened to this book on audio, read by Yelena Shmulenson and her thick Yiddish accent definitely adds a lot of atmosphere to the story.

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It is 1977 and seventeen-year-old Mona Manoliu has fallen in love with Mihai, a mysterious boy who lives in the romantic mountain city where she spends her summers. She can think of nothing and no one else. The free online library containing 450000+ books. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

For Alexander and Nicholas. PART ONE. Orange Moons. I HAVE LEFT the Black Sea, my skin golden and salty, and my tangled hair brighter from the sun, to take the train that crosses the land by the violet-blue waters and the yellow sunflower fields, then cuts through mountains into resin-pungent forest.

Train to Trieste follows the life of Mona Manoliu starting when she is a. .

Train to Trieste follows the life of Mona Manoliu starting when she is a teenager in Romania during the reign of dictator Nicolae Ceausescu. Times are hard, there are food shortages and restrictions. Domnica Radulescu was born in Romania and came to the United States in 1983. She lives in Lexington, Virginia, with her two sons.

TRAIN TO TRIESTE follows the deeply moving experiences of Mona Maria Manoliu as she comes of age in 1977 in.Yelena Shmulenson does justice to this exquisite literary work with an impressive intensity and range of expression.

TRAIN TO TRIESTE follows the deeply moving experiences of Mona Maria Manoliu as she comes of age in 1977 in a village at the foot of the Carpathian Mountains in Ceausescu's Romania. Sensually blending poetic imagery with the sharp contrast of life in an uncertain Communist state, Radulescu captures the heart and soul of a reluctant exile in love with her country.

Domnica Radulescu was born in Romania and came to the United States in 1983. Deeply moving and deeply felt, Train to Trieste is an unforgettable story that introduces a new and astonishingly fresh voice. About Domnica Radulescu. Arthur Golden, author of Memoirs of a Geisha A spirited, passionate, funny look at the world in the time of the new millennium. Domnica Radulescu is a remarkable writer enriching American letters with her Romanian perspective.

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Train to Trieste has been added to your Cart. Domnica Radulescu writes a straight forward story with ease and conviction. There aren't phoney literary flourishes, the characters come alive, the mood envelopes the reader, the setting is authentic. A book to be recommended for an easy, pleasant read on a winter's night. 5 people found this helpful.

Narrated by Yelena Shmulenson. The lyrical story of a young woman's journey from the totalitarianism of Eastern Europe to the freedom of America, told by.

Written by Domnica Radulescu, Audiobook narrated by Yelena Shmulenson. But when her dying father urges her to return to Romania, she realizes that she must journey back to find out the truth about her one great love. What is the new American novel?

The lyrical story of a young woman's journey from the totalitarianism of Eastern Europe to the freedom of America, told by an author who knows first-hand about living in a cruel and absurd dictatorship.It's the summer of 1977, and seventeen-year-old Mona is madly in love. Visiting her aunt's village at the foot of the misty Carpathian mountains, all she can think about is the mysterious, handsome Mihai, the woods where they linger, his deep green eyes, and his cool, starched sheets.Romania is in the early years of the repressive Ceausescu regime. One day Mona sees Mihai wearing the black leather jacket favored by the secret police. Could he be one of them?As food shortages worsen, paranoia grows, and more of her loved ones disappear in "accidents," Mona realizes she must leave her country. She makes a daring escape to America without saying goodbye to Mihai. In Chicago, she becomes a doctoral student, marries, has children, and tries to bury her longing for the past-until she feels compelled to return home and learn the truth about her one great love.

Malalrajas
Domnica Radulescu' semi-autobiographical debut novel, "Train to Trieste," is a fascinating page turner, full of contrasts. She describes, with nostalgia and much love, her homeland, Romania, with its physical beauty, it's mountains, plains, rivers, forests, and extraordinary seaside resorts and homes on the Black Sea. She writes of "one beautiful summer," with its "linden trees and vodka made from fermented plums and stars and mountains and raspberries...." The scenery is "gorgeous," the Carpathian Mountains are dark and mysterious - a perfect place for our protagonist, seventeen year-old Mona Manoliu, to fall in love. It is the summer of 1977.

His name is Mihai, "a green eyed, charismatic, mountain boy" grieving for the loss of his first love who died in a tragic accident. Mona meets him when summering with her family in the foothills of the Carpathians. She is immediately drawn to him and her compassion and love comforts Mihai. Soon the young couple are inseparable. Their sensuality and passion are palpable. They become lovers. At summers end Mona returns to the family home in Bucharest and makes plans to see Mihai the following summer.

Contrasting with this beauty and romance, is the brutal government of Nicolae Andruta Ceausescu, President of Romania from 1974 to 1979. Against the exquisite backdrop of his country, Ceausescu, with his narcissistic cult of personality, actually carries a sceptre in public. Opposition is ruthlessly suppressed by the hated secret police, the Securitate. Intellectuals and artists are cautioned not to overstep the mark of "permissible" free expression. But freedom of speech is severely limited and the media is controlled. It is even illegal to own a typewriter without an official license. Mona lives in fear that her intellectual father's typewriter will be discovered. He is a poetry professor, a dissident, and is watched by the Securitate, as is she.

At the beginning of the 1980s Ceausescu introduced an austerity program in order to pay off Romania's foreign debt, causing hunger, deprivation, long food lines where, when one reaches the end, there is nothing more to buy. The standard of living plunges and while most Romanians are starving, cold and living without electricity, Ceausescu and his family continue to be surrounded by comfort and privilege. It is estimated that at least 15,000 Romanians died per year as a result of the austerity program. There is much paranoia amongst the people. After all, one's best friend could turn out to be a spy.

After an old woman whispers ugly rumors in Mona's ear, she fears that her love, Mihai, might be a spy, especially when she sees him in a black leather jacket. The secret police wear black leather jackets. Friends and relatives disappear and/or die under suspicious circumstances. Tens of thousands of lives were ruined during Ceausescu's reign.

When her father is directly threatened and her own life is in danger, Mona's parents encourage her to flee the country, and leave Mihai, her family and homeland behind. Alone and terrified, Mona chooses the "Train to Trieste," one of the well known escape routes. The train, on its way to Rome, stops briefly in Trieste, where Mona reflects on her past and her unknown future. She finally reaches the US and goes to Chicago, where she begins a new life. But she cannot forget her passion for Romania and Mihai, and her love for her parents. Her story spins out over the years, and ends with a surprising conclusion.

Author Domnica Radulescu, like the heroine of her novel, escaped from Romania in the early 1980s, studied literature at the University of Chicago, and is an extremely talented writer. She vividly expresses the horrors of life under the Ceausescus, and contrasts the repressive regime against the backdrop of the landscape's physical beauty, and the happy times that Mona, her family, and her lover spend together. She writes of Mona's fear, her intensely sensual feelings of love, as well as her conflicting emotions about Mihai. Should she love him, fear him, or both? Pleasure is contrasted with melancholy and pain.

I enjoyed "Train to Trieste." It is not often that one gets to read a book set in Ceauºescu's Romania. Refreshingly, there is not a word written about Transylvania and Dracula!! However, Ceauºescu' is an apt substitute.

Unfortunately, there are portions of the narrative which are slow and almost boring. The author is unable to sustain the tension and excitement of the storyline about the misery of the Romanian people and an intense but brief love affair. Instances of Mona's life in Chicago are interesting and, at times, quite humorous. But there are repetitive passages which affect the novel's pace. Otherwise, I would have rated it with 5 stars. I do recommend "Train to Trieste," however. Although it may not be a novel for everyone, overall it is makes for a well written and unusual read.
Jana Perskie
Gavinranadar
Travelling frequently to Romania during much of the period covered in this book, I found it right on target in describing the utter lunacy of that communist system.Romanians had to put up with much: Lack of food in a country that produced mountains of food (it was exported for hard currency); a society ruled by the secret police; a dictator who was barely literate, citizens who lacked for everything from heat in their homes to sanitary napkins for women. In a word every economic and social deprivation you can think of in a modern society existed in the Romania of that period (from the 50s to the end of the 80s) The author catches flavor flawlessly and combines it with a love story that is sweet but not sugary. The problem occurs when she leaves Europe and comes to America as an indigent immigrant. Here the story loses its vigor and interest since it is a fairly standard example of an immigrant's American success story.
I assume that much of this story is autobiographical. The heroine, like the author, escaped from Romania, studied in America, teaches in a university and has two sons (presumably the auhtor is, like the heroine, also divorced since she doesn't mention a husband in her book jacket
bio). Domnica Radulescu writes a straight forward story with ease and conviction. There aren't phoney literary flourishes, the characters come alive, the mood envelopes the reader, the setting is authentic.
A book to be recommended for an easy, pleasant read on a winter's night.
*Nameless*
I loved the book it brought also back to me, my very sad adolescent in the years of 1950, which were very similar and more cruel as those described in the book by Ms Radulescu, The book even if it is a "fiction" it
is based I am sure on real events happened in life . It is describing the real hardships of everyday life the struggle to survive , to find food and all the necessities to have a proper life. I am a native of Brasov and during my childhood I was woken every school day by the ringing of the Black Church Bells , I was skiing ,on the described slopes, hiking on the described mountains and dreaming under the same starry skies.
Golden freddi
Predictable in every way!
Orevise
Easy reading that held my interest.
Jake
Love this audio book and I am so blessed to be able to purchase it at a much-needed low price. Thank you so much!
Eigeni
The book really takes you to Romania, and the prose is beautiful, it follows the life of one girl living in and leaving Romania makes the story personal.
I am a romanian myself, and I was a child during communism, but I still remember those times. This book reminds me about those time, and some parts about how is to be an immigrant trying to accomodate in a new country. I liked it, and I couldn't wait to see what happends next. Very nice love story, and a very interesting novel.