Download An Unequal Marriage fb2

by Emma Tennant
Download An Unequal Marriage fb2
Contemporary
  • Author:
    Emma Tennant
  • ISBN:
    034061353X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0340613535
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Sceptre; First Edition edition (October 6, 1994)
  • Pages:
    208 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Contemporary
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1832 kb
  • ePUB format
    1357 kb
  • DJVU format
    1143 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    607
  • Formats:
    lrf lit lrf txt


An Unequal Marriage book.

An Unequal Marriage book.

An Unequal Marriage" begins almost twenty years after the events in "Pride and Prejudice". Mr. and Mrs. Darcy enjoy an impossibly perfect marriage full of perfect love, perfect gentility, and perfect beauty. By this point I'm wondering if Tennant realizes exactly how misogynistic her book is. Look at the two main threads that run throughout the book: feminism is the domain of crazy, irrational man-haters who are too stupid to understand that their place in life is as a man's playtoy and general submissive servant; and women who are superficially perfect in every way make trouble for their husbands by attracting men - but women who aren't.

An Unequal Marriage; or, Pride and Prejudice Twenty Years Later, London: Sceptre; New York: St. Martin's Press, 1994.

According to Tennant, he "tossed my book into a wastepaper basket and declared, 'This book stands for the decadence of British contemporary culture'. It was not until 1973 that her second novel, The Time of the Crack, was first published. An Unequal Marriage; or, Pride and Prejudice Twenty Years Later, London: Sceptre; New York: St. Travesties, London and Boston: Faber and Faber, 1995.

Or, Pride and Prejudice Twenty Years Later. Tennant's wretched second sequel to Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice (after Pemberley, 1993) has none of the beloved original's wit, brilliance, or biting satire

Or, Pride and Prejudice Twenty Years Later. Tennant's wretched second sequel to Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice (after Pemberley, 1993) has none of the beloved original's wit, brilliance, or biting satire. Nearly 20 years after Elizabeth and Darcy first met, the couple is as much in love as ever-and as young as ever, to hear Tennant describe them. Elizabeth is flirtatious and spry, and she and her 17-year-old daughter, Miranda, are like sisters.

6 14 5 Author: Emma Tennant Narrator: Anne Dover. Download books offline, listen to several books continuously, choose stories for your kids, or try out a book that you didn't thought you would like to listen to. The best book experience you'd ever had. Mr Darcy and Elizabeth now have two children, Miranda and Edward.

I found An Unequal Marriage to be a fun continuation of the story of Pride and Prejudice, if rather melodramatic. Which would never happen if Jane A had written the book. This is the second book of Emma Tennant's that I have read the first being Pemberly, and I am not impressed in the least. She is a disgrace to the proffesion of being a author.

Tennant, Emma; Austen, Jane, 1775-1817. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Слушайте An Unequal Marriage (автор: Emma Tennant, Anne Dover) бесплатно 30 дней в течении пробного периода. Fresh books hand-picked and sent to your door every month based on what you like. Слушайте аудиокниги без ограничений в веб-браузере или на устройствах iPad, iPhone и Android. Pride and Prejudice - Ch.

The Unequal Marriage. 174 х 137 Oil on canvas Tretyakov Gallery, Hall 16. The public was delighted with the painting

The Unequal Marriage. The public was delighted with the painting

Emma Tennant's bestselling sequels to Pride and Prejudice i.

Emma Tennant's bestselling sequels to Pride and Prejudice i. Pemberley tells of Elizabeth's failure to produce a child; while An Unequal Marriage continues the story of the Bennets and their wider circle into the next generation. Sparkling, stylish and ironic, with imaginative insights into the emotions and mores of eighteenth-century English high society, these are elegant and diverting social comedies by a master of the genre.

The Darcys have two children, Miranda and Edward. Miranda is a model daughter, well-attuned to life at Pemberley and, were it not for her sex, would make a perfect heir. Edward, alas, would not. Awful questions arise about the sucession at Pemberley.

Phain
I read everything Pride and Prejudice. I usually enjoy the continuation books. This one was ok...I felt like the author rushed through...she had a good story idea, but in the end I was left scratching my head at some decisions that were made by the characters that I disagree with. It is worth reading, but like I said the end left me scratching my head a bit.
Akinonris
It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single book in possession of a good sales history must be in want of a sequel. This book, however, is not that sequel.

"An Unequal Marriage" begins almost twenty years after the events in "Pride and Prejudice". Mr. and Mrs. Darcy enjoy an impossibly perfect marriage full of perfect love, perfect gentility, and perfect beauty. Their daughter Miranda is a perfect delight, their son Edward - well, he's young, headstrong, foolish, and (worst of all) short. But everything else is utterly perfect, to the point that even old Lady Catherine gives her grudging approval to Elizabeth's impeccable reign as mistress of Pemberley. But this unrealistically idyllic life collapses in the wink of an eye - or so it seems - after Darcy and Elizabeth have words over their son's descent into folly. The entire edifice, all twenty years of married super-ultra-bliss, is destroyed in an instant: Elizabeth runs away, suddenly turning into a strident, raving pseudo-feminist who endlessly whines and complains to herself about the inequities of the time while she's on the run from the eeeevil, inferior Mr. Darcy. Three pages before the end, though, deus ex Bingley suddenly clears up the Big Misunderstanding and saves the day and everything is instantly back to normal.

Roger Ebert calls plots like this Idiot Plots, because they only work if every character acts like an idiot. Which is the case here: none of the characters have even the slightest amount of common sense, nor do they have anything in common with Austen's characters other than name. Elizabeth gets the worst of it, becoming an impossibly perfect Mary Sue, at least superficially. Every man is in love with her, every man thinks she's the most beautiful woman in England, every man wants her - and it's all about her physical appearance, which is suddenly the only thing about her that matters to anyone. This character derailment is apparently necessary so that Tennant can create sexual tension between Elizabeth and other men once she runs away from Darcy (because naturally no woman who isn't physically perfect could ever attract a suitor).

By this point I'm wondering if Tennant realizes exactly how misogynistic her book is. Look at the two main threads that run throughout the book: feminism is the domain of crazy, irrational man-haters who are too stupid to understand that their place in life is as a man's playtoy and general submissive servant; and women who are superficially perfect in every way make trouble for their husbands by attracting men - but women who aren't superficially perfect in every way are hideous monsters that no man will ever look at. Does she have the slightest clue of how ridiculous and contradictory these threads are?

She also manages to combine overwrought melodrama with what I suppose she thinks is "gritty realism" - Bingley had a mistress, Mary is dead, the Darcy son is mentally unstable. But this supposed realism only serves to suck any residual Austen charm out of the story. The reader loses interest in the characters and the plot long before Tennant hits the big red Reset Button three pages before the end. (Not to mention that the Darcy son's problem has no relationship to any real-life psychiatric disorder.)

The writing, and especially the clunky dialogue, is also sub-par. In many of Mrs. Bennet's scenes (I'm thinking specifically of a scene early in the book featuring Charlotte Collins and Lady Lucas) the characters seem to be merely bellowing unrelated phrases at each other. It's confusing and annoying and does nothing to advance whatever ragged plot there is.

If you're in the market for a continuation of "Pride and Prejudice", look elsewhere. I so do not recommend this book.
Naril
What a Horrible, HORRIBLE book! The sitcom-esq ending where everything is wrapped up in the last 3 pages as all a big misunderstanding do nothing to save this book.
After 19 years of marriage Elizabeth and Darcy are "sooo" much in love, that is until they receive some bad news, and Darcy concludes that he made a mistake in perusing Elizabeth after he learned of her family's insanity all those years ago. AND TELLS HER SO! Elizabeth, in turn, realizes that Darcy is a "monster," and wishes for equality of the sexes so that she may get a divorce. Her realization of her superior character is what inspires the title of "an unequal marriage." This also leads her to become bitter about Jane's happiness.
Of the 180 so pages of this book over 170 are dedicated to the hatred and resentment of the Darcys. This book is written from bitterness and contempt of love. It has nothing to do with the original sentiments of Austin, and is uninteresting and depressing in its own right. The shortness of the book make it undeveloped and do nothing to justify the stream ill events and bad feelings.
The book only serves as a laundry list of bad happenings and despair only to have the curtain whipped aside at the very end to say "silly Elizabeth, none of that's true - now lets go to Italy and be Rich!" All of the fair-weather love and weak loyalties are supposed to be forgotten in the end pronouncement of an undying and strong love. This sentiment is our reward for wading through the dreadfulness of the book.
Silly reader! Don't waste your time, money or good feelings on this wretched excuse for a story of love.
Funky
What a Horrible, HORRIBLE book! The sitcom-esq ending where everything is wrapped up in the last 3 pages as all a big misunderstanding do nothing to save this book.

After 19 years of marriage Elizabeth and Darcy are "sooo" much in love, that is until they receive some bad news, and Darcy concludes that he made a mistake in perusing Elizabeth after he learned of her family's insanity all those years ago. AND TELLS HER SO! Elizabeth, in turn, realizes that Darcy is a "monster," and wishes for equality of the sexes so that she may get a divorce. Her realization of her superior character is what inspires the title of "an unequal marriage." This also leads her to become bitter about Jane's happiness.

Of the 180 so pages of this book over 170 are dedicated to the hatred and resentment of the Darcys. This book is written from bitterness and contempt of love. It has nothing to do with the original sentiments of Austin, and is uninteresting and depressing in its own right. The shortness of the book make it undeveloped and do nothing to justify the stream ill events and bad feelings.

The book only serves as a laundry list of bad happenings and despair only to have the curtain whipped aside at the very end to say "silly Elizabeth, none of that's true - now lets go to Italy and be Rich!" All of the fair-weather love and weak loyalties are supposed to be forgotten in the end pronouncement of an undying and strong love. This sentiment is our reward for wading through the dreadfulness of the book.

Silly reader! Don't waste your time, money or good feelings on this wretched excuse for a story of love.