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by Geoffrey Harvey,Jerome K. Jerome
Download Three Men in a Boat/Three Men on the Bummel (Oxford World's Classics) fb2
Classics
  • Author:
    Geoffrey Harvey,Jerome K. Jerome
  • ISBN:
    0192880330
  • ISBN13:
    978-0192880338
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Oxford University Press (October 15, 1998)
  • Pages:
    330 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Classics
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1684 kb
  • ePUB format
    1550 kb
  • DJVU format
    1432 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    796
  • Formats:
    azw lrf mbr lrf


About ten years later, Jerome wrote a sequel, Three Men on the Bummel (also known as Three . These two books detail the misadventures of three adult? British men as they take vacations from their lives of daily toil (which lives would seem like a vacation to the rest of us).

About ten years later, Jerome wrote a sequel, Three Men on the Bummel (also known as Three Men on Wheels), in which the three Englishmen, now middle aged, with two of them married and having children, escape from the claustrophobia of suburban life to go on an equally picaresque cycling and hiking tour in the Black Forest of Germany. The stories are hilarious; I particularly love the scene in which the dog meets his match is a tough street cat. This is a great fun book to read and re-read.

It provides brilliant snap-shots of London's playground in the late 1880s, where the fashionable steam-launches of river swells encounter the hired skiffs of city clerks.

Three men in a boat (to say nothing of the dog). Publisher’s advertisement

Three men in a boat (to say nothing of the dog). Publisher’s advertisement. Originally published in August, 1889, it has been year after year reprinted, until there has been produced the large number of 202,000 copies.

It provides brilliant snap-shots of London's playground in the late 1880s, where the fashionable steam-launches of river swells encounter the hired skiffs of city clerks

It provides brilliant snap-shots of London's playground in the late 1880s, where the fashionable steam-launches of river swells encounter the hired skiffs of city clerks. The medley of social vignettes, farcical incidents, descriptions of river fashions, and reflections on the Thames's history, is interspersed with humorous anecdotes told by a natural raconteur.

The book was initially.

Three Men In An Omnibus. Published November 8th 1984 by Mandarin. Published 1984 by Bibliophile Books. The World's Best Reading, Leather Bound, 392 pages. Author(s): Jerome K. Jerome.

Three men in a boat ( to say nothing of the dog )

Three men in a boat ( to say nothing of the dog ). by jerome k. Author of "Idle thoughts of an idle fellow," "Stage land," etc. Illustrations by A. Frederics. I remember going to the British Museum oneday to read up the treatment for some slight ailment of which I had atouch-hay fever, I fancy it was. I got down the book, and read all Icame to read; and then, in an unthinking moment, I idly turned theleaves, and began to indolently study diseases, generally.

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This volume stands as the only available critical edition of two of the most popular classics in English literature. Three Men in a Boat describes a comic expedition by middle-class Victorians up the Thames to Oxford, providing along the way brilliant snap-shots of London's playground in the late 1880s. In Three Men on the Bummel, the three Englishmen escape from the claustrophobia of suburban life some ten years later to go on a cycling tour in the Black Forest of Germany.

Manris
These 19th century travel tales are witty, observant, and fun to read. The author details his travels with a couple of friends in a boat on the Thames and then on a bike across Germany.
He promises to offer no practical information and no scenery, but you will still get a sense of what it was like to travel in Europe a century ago. More than that, you'll get plenty of insights into what it's like to travel with human beings -- now as much as then. Human nature hasn't changed, and you'll recognize yourself and your own friends and family in Jerome's pithy observations.
Enjoy these books on your own vacation, or just when you feel that you need a vacation. You'll laugh out loud.
นℕĨĈტℝ₦
When I was in eighth and ninth grades, our Latin teacher, Mrs. Ruth Mackey, wrote a different aphorism on the blackboard every day. One that has always stuck with me is “I like work; it fascinates me. I can sit and look at it for hours,” attributed to Jerome K. Jerome (1859-1927). I was recently surprised to learn that this quote is taken from a book by Jerome, Three Men in a Boat, published in 1889. Three middle-class Victorian friends, J. the narrator, George, and Harris, all young and single, along with Montmorency the dog set off on a comic expedition up the Thames to Oxford. Their hilarious misadventures along the way provide the author with opportunities to make brilliant social comments about English life in the late 1880s.

About ten years later, Jerome wrote a sequel, Three Men on the Bummel (also known as Three Men on Wheels), in which the three Englishmen, now middle aged, with two of them married and having children, escape from the claustrophobia of suburban life to go on an equally picaresque cycling and hiking tour in the Black Forest of Germany. Again, there is social commentary, not only about Germany but also more about England as well. Instances of smoking tobacco and drinking alcohol are found, though when writing about the excessive drinking of beer in Germany, the author seems not to approve of it. And references to swearing and cursing occur. In the first book, aside from the euphemistic “darn,” there is no actual bad language, but in the second, the “d” word is used a few times.

Some people, especially those who do not care for (or understand) the old-style, dry, British type of humor, may not think that the books are really all that funny, but I consider the observations quite witty. And one learns a little about the history and geography of both England and Germany along the way. Admittedly, Jerome chases a lot of rabbit trails in his descriptions of the events, but that is part of what makes them so humorous. The stories are based on real occurrences but are highly fictionalized. Each novel is rather short. Modern combined editions have been published by both Oxford University Press and Penguin Classics (2000). By the way, do you know what a “bummel” is? J. describes it as “a journey, long or short, without an end; the only thing regulating it being the necessity of getting back within a given time to the point from which one started.”
Bolanim
I had never heard of this book - but noticed it in an interview with Jasper Fforde - the Thursday Next writer - when he said it was one of his all time favorites. It is just 160 pages long - published in 1889 - and a big success in Europe and US at the time. Three men and a dog go up/down the Thames from Kingston to Oxford. There is real actual information about the trip and the towns they pass - plus historical interludes - they stop at Magna Carta Island where it was supposedly signed for example. The three are basically wackos - the author's descriptions of the characters - their past escapades - and commentaries on a variety of subjects sneak up on you and leave you gasping for air as you laugh uncontrolable - I can't see how one could read it out loud to an audience. Ther was a second book - in the same edition with the same characters in a bicycle ride thru the Black Forest in Germany - I have't started it yet but will soon when I have calmed down.
White_Nigga
This is one of the funniest books I've ever read. So why only 4 stars? Because it's not consistantly funny. The problem seems to be that Jerome started to write a travel story, with some serious thought on history and life, and added a few humorous bits as he went along. His editor got him to tone down the history and emphasize the humor, but we, the readers, are still stuck with some dreary Victorian romantic musings.

But then there are the funny bits. And there are a lot of them. I'd say 80% of this book is funny, and a good 10% is hysterically funny. Well worth the few dull patches.

WARNING: Do not read this in a public place. You WILL embarrass yourself by laughing out loud. The pages on cheese are especially deadly. I still giggle uncontrolably each time I re-read them.
Niwield
This was for my husband and it was a perfect choice. He hasn't put it down!! The paperback version is great for him since he is one of those people that bend it wide open to read. Drives me nuts when he reads my books so it is nice that this is his.
happy light
Bought as a gift. The EXTRA large print makes it very bulky and not easy to read especially for an elderly man.
Malahelm
Yes, this IS the book Robert Heinlein was referring to in his classic sci-fi book, "Have Space Suit-Will Travel", and the scene with the can of pineapple is even funnier than I would have believed possible. These two books detail the misadventures of three adult? British men as they take vacations from their lives of daily toil (which lives would seem like a vacation to the rest of us). The stories are hilarious; I particularly love the scene in which the dog meets his match is a tough street cat. This is a great fun book to read and re-read.
This is a fantastic novelette. I was laughing out loud throughout the entire book and there are certainly places where the reading is filled with detailed and beautiful passages. A great read.