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by Marcus Clarke
Download For the Term of His Natural Life fb2
Classics
  • Author:
    Marcus Clarke
  • ISBN:
    1876930004
  • ISBN13:
    978-1876930004
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Victorian Book Wholesalers P/L (October 19, 2000)
  • Pages:
    448 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Classics
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1656 kb
  • ePUB format
    1257 kb
  • DJVU format
    1339 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    990
  • Formats:
    docx mobi azw lrf


For the Term of His Natural Life is a story written by Marcus Clarke and published in The Australian Journal between 1870 and 1872 (as His Natural Life).

For the Term of His Natural Life is a story written by Marcus Clarke and published in The Australian Journal between 1870 and 1872 (as His Natural Life). It was published as a novel in 1874 and is the best known novelisation of life as a convict in early Australian history. At times relying on seemingly implausible coincidences, the story follows the fortunes of Rufus Dawes, a young man transported for a murder that he did not commit

Dedication to sir charles gavan duffy.

Dedication to sir charles gavan duffy. I have endeavoured in "His Natural Life" to set forth the working andthe results of an English system of transportation carefully consideredand carried out under official supervision; and to illustrate in themanner best calculated, as I think, to attract general attention, theinexpediency of again allowing offenders against the law to be herdedtogether in places remote from the wholesome influence of publicopinion, and to. be submitted to a discipline which must necessarilydepend for its just administration upon the personal character andtemper of their gaolers.

His capture helped to securethe brief freedom of his comrades; for Mr. Troke, content with oneprisoner, checked a pursuit which the nature of the ground rendereddangerous, and triumphantly brought Dawes back to the settlement. Troke, content with oneprisoner, checked a pursuit which the nature of the ground rendereddangerous, and triumphantly brought Dawes back to the settlement as hispeace-offering for the negligence which had resulted in the loss of theother four. He enacted the scene with his mother over again. Heharangued the rocks, and called upon the stones about him to witness hisinnocence and his sacrifice. He was visited by the phantoms of his earlyfriends, and sometimes thought his present life a dream.

Last updated Wednesday, December 17, 2014 at 12:58. To the best of our knowledge, the text of this work is in the Public Domain in Australia

Last updated Wednesday, December 17, 2014 at 12:58. To the best of our knowledge, the text of this work is in the Public Domain in Australia. eBooksaide The University of Adelaide Library University of Adelaide South Australia 5005.

Marcus Clarke uses his novel to describe the convict system. It’s a lot like slavery, except that the convicts have no monetary value, contrary to slaves. It’s always in their administrative coldness that inhumane businesses inadvertently show their inhumanity. As I said, I was interested in the workings of the penal settlements but I would have enjoyed For The Term of His Natural Life a lot more if it had been written in a more sober manner and if the discussions about the penal system had been more challenging. I had trouble with the book’s style and its literary genre.

I felt strong influence from that, and from Les Mis - no worse for it, but rather an argument for unabashed influence.

First published in 1874, Marcus Clarke’s vivid and brutal depictions of convict life have come to define our colonial history

First published in 1874, Marcus Clarke’s vivid and brutal depictions of convict life have come to define our colonial history. Still beloved by readers today, For the Term of His Natural Life remains the most important Australian book of the nineteenth century, and a vital part of our cultural and literary identity. Marcus Clarke was born in 1846 in Kensington, London. At age seventeen Clarke left England for Australia, where his uncle was a county court judge. Despite an early career in banking, Clarke had begun to write professionally by 1867, penning stories for the Australian Magazine and.

Marcus Andrew Hislop Clarke (24 April 1846 - 2 August 1881) was an English-born Australian novelist and poet, best known for his novel For the Term of His Natural Life. It is the best known novelisation of life as a convict in early Australian history. At times relying on seemingly implausible coincidences, the story follows the fortunes of Rufus Dawes, a young man transported for a murder that he did not commit.

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Waiso
This is one of the most depressing books I have ever read. I don't want to give away the plot, but I will say that it's the story of a very unlucky man who is wrongly accused of a crime he has not committed and is deported to what is today Tasmania. Clarke wrote this book years after the deportation system had been abolished and perhaps what he is trying to say is: "That happened when the English were in charge, but now we are Australia and we don't do that." There is no hope in this book, even the clergy is unable to offer any comfort. Injustice, cruelty and abuse of power are the themes and death is the only way out. From a historical point of view, the story is very informational but it is at times really hard to believe that all that is described is true. In some chapters, the book looks like an adventure book, but in the end we are left with the impression that there is no redemption.
Lilegha
It really shows how badly the prisoners were treated going from England to Tasmania. The British of that time were very cruel to men who did petty crimes. The men who were hanged were the lucky ones, Far better to die than live in a prison work camp .
Mmsa
This book was very good at demonstrating the injustice and cruelty of the 19th Century, British penal system and the attitudes which propped it up. Following the fortunes, or rather misfortunes of the main character was at first interesting but became a bit monotonous,frustrating and depressing due to his dogged determination to follow one general course of action down a path of self destruction. The ending was somewhat trite and disappointing.
Onaxan
I found this story engrossing-it gave me an insight into how the convicts must have suffered in the early days in Tasmania-being deported for such minor offences-then slaving under horrendous conditions-& imprisonment in harsh surroundings. Would recommend this to anyone interested in Australia's early history , I have actually been to some of the places mentioned in the book and they look just as grim now as they would have been in the period about which the book was written.
Helldor
This is both a very fascinating and a very frustrating book. Its principal protagonist is Rufus Dawes, a young Englishman from a wealthy family, who allows his pride to put him into the terrifying experience of becoming a prisoner condemned to transportation. Along the way he encounters other characters - each with his or her own reasons for being (sometimes literally) in the same boat.

What makes the book fascinating is the abundance of detail about a youthful Australia and the abuses of its terrible prison system. What makes the book frustrating is that Marcus Clarke has written in Rufus Dawes a lead character who is driven almost entirely by his pride, which has the effect of trapping him in situations from which common sense would allow him to escape or at least alleviate. This is probably intended to stand in for his fatal flaw, but it gets a little old, which is one of the two reasons I give it four stars instead of five. The second reason for the lowered rating is because Clarke is BIG on coincidences - huge overwhelmingly unlikely, mind-numbing coincidences. He doesn't use the coincidence device a lot, but when he does, the use is awe-inspiring.

The book was written in the 1870s by an expatriate Englishman who had become an Australian journalist whose job allowed him to research the infamous prison system in great depth. If this makes it sound like it would be dry, don't be deceived. It is a rip-roaring adventure that I highly recommend.
Froststalker
For English speakers who have graduated from high school after only the past 30 years, this book cannot be adequately read without a dictionary. The grammar, choice of words the mastery of English expression, not to mention the rivetting story line are incredible. For one who would want to understand the brutality of the penal settlements of Tasmania and Norfolk island, this book is a must read.
Gavinranara
This is not a pleasant story, but it most certainly is compelling. I learned a lot about penal colonies too. The plot and the characters are great. The author explores human nature in a most realistic way. There is something that renders this book really unique. I suppose I really liked the values, such as honour and the force of human spirit, that are prominent in it. It is a thought provoking book, but that doen not get in the way of the plot and of the tragic crescendo that few authors manage to achieve.
I absolutely loved the book. But the softback I bought was almost unreadable. It was in a format which one couldn't read....the size was that of a school textbook and the font went completely across the page. I ended up buying a copy in Melbourne which was wonderful which was the "typical book" format. I loved the story. It was recommended to me by friends in Sydney, and after visiting Tasmania and Port Arthur, I think it was the most memorable book i read. I loved it.