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by Thomas P. Whitney,Vasily Grossman
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Classics
  • Author:
    Thomas P. Whitney,Vasily Grossman
  • ISBN:
    0060116137
  • ISBN13:
    978-0060116132
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Harper & Row; 1st edition (1972)
  • Pages:
    247 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Classics
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1868 kb
  • ePUB format
    1803 kb
  • DJVU format
    1812 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    193
  • Formats:
    lit lrf azw mbr


Forever Flowing book. Everything Flows is Vasily Grossman’s final testament, written after the Soviet authorities suppressed his masterpiece, Life and Fate.

Forever Flowing book. The main story is simple: released after thirty years in the Soviet camps, Ivan Grigoryevich must struggle to find a place for himself in an unfamiliar world. But in a novel that seeks to take in the whole tragedy of Soviet history, Ivan’s Everything Flows is Vasily Grossman’s final testament, written after the Soviet authorities suppressed his masterpiece, Life and Fate.

Forever flowing was Grossman's last book. Grossman began writing this book in 1955, two years after Stalin died. It was completed one year before the author's death in 1964, but was not published until 1970. The Reds tried to burn every copy. They even confiscated his typewriter ribbon. Framed as a novel, and written with great tenderness, "Forever Flowing" is primarily a history of the horrors of the Soviet state before, during, and after its Stalinist phase.

by. Grossman, Vasilii, author. Whitney, Thomas . translator. Ex-convicts - Russia - Fiction, Ex-convicts, Social conditions, Soviet Union - Fiction, Russia - Social conditions - 20th century - Fiction, Russia, Soviet Union. Sony Alpha-A6300 (Control).

Northwestern University Press, 1997 - 247 Seiten. Grossman's books were issued in the Soviet Union in the late 1980s and have met with both admiration and, on part of the nationalist right wing, considerable hostility. Bibliografische Informationen. Forever Flowing European classics.

The Soviet writer Vasily Grossman finished his major novel, Life and Fate, in 1960, four years before his death . Everything Flows has been translated into English before, as Forever Flowing (1972), by Thomas P Whitney.

The Soviet writer Vasily Grossman finished his major novel, Life and Fate, in 1960, four years before his death from stomach cancer. It could have made him as famous as Solzhenitsyn in the west, but it wasn't published anywhere until the 1980s, and until fairly recently he was little known in the English-speaking world. com: what is it with these Russianists? – as clumsy, error-filled and "based on an incomplete manuscript".

Vse Teche. y Vasilii Grossman. Frankfurt am Main: Possev-Verlag, 1970. Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service. Translated from the Russian by Thomas P. Whitney. New York, Evanston, San Francisco, London: Harper & Row, 1972. Vse Teche.

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The main story is simple: released after thirty years in the Soviet camps, Ivan Grigoryevich must struggle to find a place for himself in an unfamiliar world.

Items related to Forever Flowering. Home Grossman, Vasily (Translated By Thomas P. Whitney) Forever Flowering. Grossman, Vasily (Translated By Thomas P. Whitney). ISBN 10: 0233963936, ISBN 13: 9780233963938. Published by Andre Deutsch, London, 1973. Condition: Good Hardcover. From PsychoBabel & Skoob Books (Didcot, OXON, United Kingdom).

Translated from the Russian by Robert and Elizabeth Chandler. Vasily Grossman has become recognized not only as one of the great war novelists of all time but also as one of the first and most important of witnesses to the Shoah.

The novel tells the story of Ivan Grigoryevich, who has returned to Russia after thirty years in the Gulag. After short and unsatisfying visits to familiar places and persons in Moscow and Leningrad, the hero settles in a southern provincial town where he briefly establishes a new life with a war widow. Ivan Grigoryevich eventually returns to his boyhood home on the Black Sea, where he is finally able to come to terms with the inhumanity of the new Russian regime.

Nto
Grossman was a reporter who followed the Red Army through hell. He was Jewish and was one of the first to report on the horrors of the Nazi murder camps. After the war he fell into disfavor with Stalin and his crew. They didn't want any emphasis on Jewish deaths, as it conflicted with their commie notions about "the people's struggle". Forever flowing was Grossman's last book. The Reds tried to burn every copy. They even confiscated his typewriter ribbon. Fortunately a copy was smuggled out to the west. Russian's didn't get to see this until the last '90's when the commies were finally shoved out of power. No wonder the Reds hated this book; he equates slavery under Lenin and Stalin to slavery under the Tsars. A moving chapter is devoted to Stalin's murder through forced starvation of over 10 million Ukranians in the early 1930's in his effort to establish collective farms. This book gives a wonderful perspective on current events in eastern Europe
Bolanim
Grossman began writing this book in 1955, two years after Stalin died. It was completed one year before the author's death in 1964, but was not published until 1970. Framed as a novel, and written with great tenderness, "Forever Flowing" is primarily a history of the horrors of the Soviet state before, during, and after its Stalinist phase. Grossman's chapters recounting the huge famine of 1932, which was a government-enforced starvation of millions, particularly in the Ukraine, are matchlessly brilliant and profoundly moving. The entire novel is a tribute to human freedom. It also reflects the great courage of its author. In my opinion, "Forever Flowing" will become more widely read as time passes, and will become increasingly recognized as one of the greatest books of the 20th century. It is a true classic. The lucid translation by Thomas P. Whitney is excellent. Very highly recommended!
Error parents
As in his more famous "Life and Fate," Grossman does a brilliant job getting into the minds of a variety of Soviet characters who are forced to deal with Stalin's brutal system and its aftermath. It is enlightening for those of us in the West to realize that, unlike the Germans after the fall of Hitler, the Russian people never had "closure" with their even bloodier past. Grossman shows us the thinking, not only of the released prisoners of the gulag, but the soul-searching of the men and women who denounced them or who merely stood by.
Dalallador
This translation should not have been republished. Firstly, it is both clumsy and full of errors. Secondly, it is based on an incomplete manuscript. Grossman's final, considerably expanded text was published in the Soviet Union in the late eighties. A translation of that text is long overdue!
Darkshaper
One of the best books about not only a Soviet reality but also about Russian nationalism and imperialism that still exists today and probably will be "flowing forever".
Highly recommended!!!
Dandr
This little book is in a way a short version of the giant "life and fate". In it Grossman also describes the cruelties of stalinism, illustrated by the return of an old man, after 30 years in the detentioncamps. We see how his friends and family react uncomfortable, because all of them in a way were responsible for his detention, and/or have complied with the regime. Grossman depicts this psychological process in a very refined way.
But he goes further: in the end the story changes into a real pamphlet, an ode to freedom as the driving force of history, and how freedom was systematically raped in Russian history, especially in the Soviet-Union. Grossman not only writes about the cruelties of Stalin, but remarkably stresses the perfidity of Lenin. No wonder this book was only published years after the death of the author. Sometimes the story is a bit pushy, but it a real jewel.
DrayLOVE
Vasily Grossman is something of a forgotten, unsung, giant of Soviet dissident authors. Born in Berdichev, Ukraine in 1905, Grossman rose to prominence and received national acclaim as a war reporter for Red Star, the official newspaper of the Red Army. Grossman's coverage of the Battle for Stalingrad was popular and well known. In fact, Grossman may have been the first reporter to tell the story of the Holocaust, beginning with his reports subsequent to the liberation of Treblinka in Poland. Prior to the publication (abroad) of Forever Flowing Grossman had seen his other major work, Life & Fate, banned by the KGB. In February 1961, a KGB Colonel, Vladimir Prokopenko came to Grossman's flat not to arrest Grossman but to arrest his novel "Life and Fate". Grossman's manuscripts, carbon copies, notebooks and typewriter ribbons were all seized. These events took contemporaneously with the authorized publication in the USSR of Solzhenitsyn's One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich. An explanation of why Grossman was perceived as more of a threat than Solzhenitsyn can be gleaned from the contents of Forever Flowing. (The story of the eventual publication of Life and Fate is best left to reviewers of that book.)
"Forever Flowing" tells a simple, yet emotionally deep and politically nuanced tale. The story begins with the 1957 return to Moscow of Ivan Grigoryevich after 30 years of forced labor in the Gulag. (1957 marked the year in which the tide of returning prisoners of the Gulag reached its peak.) He arrives at the flat of his cousin, Nikolay Andreyevich. Nikolay, a scientist with less than stellar skills, has reached some measure of success at the laboratory through dint of being a survivor. He reaches the top of his profession only after those of his more talented colleagues are skimmed from the laboratory after purges (Stalin's last campaign - the Doctors Plot - seems to be referenced here) and other typical political campaigns. The meeting in the flat is entirely unsatisfactory for both parties. Nikolay is particularly upset (although he is not capable of figuring out why) as he sees his pale imitation of a life reflected through the prism of his cousin's 30 year journey. Grossman paints a vivid picture of Nikolay, more than a bit jealous that Ivan's light had always shone brighter than his own prior to Ivan's arrest. Nikolay suffers from the guilt of one who was not arrested and who is painfully aware of the choices he made to keep from being arrested. In that sense having Ivan sit across from him at the dinner table disturbs Nikolay no end because Ivan represents a mirror into which Nikolay can see only his own hollow reflection.
Grigoryevich leaves Moscow for his old city of Leningrad, the place where he was first arrested in 1927. There, quite by chance, he runs into the person whose denunciation placed him in jail in the first place. Grossman here embarks on a discourse on the different types and forms of denunciation available to the Soviet citizen. It is a remarkable discourse that shows how many different ways there are to participate in a purge and how many ways there are to legitimize ones participation and/or acquiescence.
From Leningrad Ivan travels to a southern industrial city where he finds work and eventually finds a deep and satisfying love in the person of his landlady, a grieving war widow. That relationship forms the centerpiece of what might be called Grossman's vision that love and freedom are two goals, not mutually exclusive, that form the essence of our shared humanity.
The above summary does not do justice to the power and depth of Grossman's prose. Further, it cannot do justice to the literary and political importance of the work. Since the death of Stalin, the Soviet line had remained relatively firm - Stalin's excesses were the product of a disturbed mind that represented a horrible deviation from the theory and principles of Leninism. The USSR's best path is the one that returned it to the path created by Lenin. Khrushchev first enunciated this line. (Brezhnev never paid it much mind as his own administration marked a step back towards Stalinism in some respects.) Even Gorbachev's perestroika was based on the theory that a return to first-principles, i.e. Leninism, would save the USSR from destruction.
Grossman did not buy into this line and Forever Flowing is noted for a remarkable attack not only on Stalin but on Lenin and Lenin's anti-democratic tendencies that had more in common with Ivan the Terrible than the principles of revolutionary democracy. "All the triumphs of Party and State were bound up with the name of Lenin. But all the cruelty inflicted on the nation also lay - tragically - on Lenin's shoulders." Grossman may have been the first to make this leap and he paid the price for making that leap. (This involves the suppression of his Life & Fate.)
Despite the horrors set out, quietly and without excess rhetoric, Grossman returns to an somewhat optimistic vision of mans search for freedom" "No matter how enormous the skyscrapers, no matter how powerful the cannon, no matter how unlimited the might of the state, no matter how vast its empire, all this was only smoke and mist which would disappear. There remained alive and growing one genuine force alone, consisting of one element only - freedom. To live meant to be a free human being.
Forever Flowing (and Life and Fate) are well worth the time and attention of anyone with an interest in the subject matter.