Download The Black Album fb2

by Hanif Kureishi
Download The Black Album fb2
British & Irish
  • Author:
    Hanif Kureishi
  • ISBN:
    0684813424
  • ISBN13:
    978-0684813424
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Scribner; 1st Scribner ed edition (September 1, 1995)
  • Pages:
    288 pages
  • Subcategory:
    British & Irish
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1404 kb
  • ePUB format
    1722 kb
  • DJVU format
    1122 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    502
  • Formats:
    mobi mbr txt azw


The Black Album book. Hanif Kureishi has never been an author to write to placate the masses, and he didn’t attempt so here either.

The Black Album book. This novel didn’t please everyone-in fact, it might have offended some-but if you’re looking for a single word to describe this pick, I’ve got one for you: soul. Keep in mind that this novel was Kureishi's response to the fatwah intent on killing Salman Rushdie for writing The Satanic Verses that was issued by Islamic fundamentalists.

adapted for the stage by the author. The Black Album was a novel I had begun to think about in 1991, not long after the publication of my first book, The Buddha of Suburbia. Unlike that story, which I’d been trying to tell in numerous versions since I first decided to become a writer, aged fourteen, The Black Album was more or less contemporary, a ‘state of Britain’ narrative not unlike those I’d grown up watching, enthralled and excited, in the theatre, particularly the Royal Court, and on television.

Hanif Kureishi: The Black Album is a sprawling book about late 80s London, taking in radical Islam, ecstasy – and Prince

Hanif Kureishi: The Black Album is a sprawling book about late 80s London, taking in radical Islam, ecstasy – and Prince. This was a novel I had begun to think about in 1991, not long after the publication of The Buddha of Suburbia.

Everyone’s standing by their own miserable class or race. Rudder’s going to say the book’s an insult and call for it to be withdrawn. The Tory leader’s agreed to do the same. главная форум контакты карта сайта правила.

The Black Album by Hanif Kureishi, set in London in the year of the fall of the Berlin Wall and the fatwah against Salman Rushdie, is a thriller with a characteristically lively background: raves, ecstasy, religious ferment and sexual passion in a dangerous time.

In the story My Son the Fanatic, which is also an award-winning film, Kureishi reveals the shifting values between a father and son-two generations of immigrants struggling between assimilation and separatist fundamentalism. The Black Album was a novel I had begun to think about in 1991, not long after the publication of my first book, The Buddha of Suburbia

adapted for the stage by the author.

Hanif Kureishi won the prestigious Whitbread Prize and was twice nominated for Oscars for best original screenplay (My Beautiful Laundrette and Venus, which starred Peter O'Toole)

Hanif Kureishi won the prestigious Whitbread Prize and was twice nominated for Oscars for best original screenplay (My Beautiful Laundrette and Venus, which starred Peter O'Toole). In 2010 Kureishi received the prestigious PEN/Pinter Prize. Collected Screenplays 1: My Beautiful Laundrette, Sammy and Rosie Get Laid, London Kills Me, My Son the Fanatic.

In The Black Album, Kureishi cautiously weaves this event into the conflicts and tensions that shape this novel’s . You may not use the material for commercial purposes.

In The Black Album, Kureishi cautiously weaves this event into the conflicts and tensions that shape this novel’s narrative. The novel’s protagonist, Shahid Hassan – a British Muslim of Pakistani descent – is caught between various identities and ideologies.

Stuck in a lackluster community college after a less-than-ideal high-school career, music-loving Shadid Hasan strives to impress two incompatible camps in his conservative Muslim neighbors and radical lecturer Deedee Osgood. 30,000 first printing. Tour.

Shadowredeemer
Book felt like a sequence of contrived situations which forced the characters to deliver soliloquies to each other based on their various views. The issues the author was trying to nut out are undeniably serious, but felt cheapened by his heavy handed technique. I'm sure other people would love it, but not my thing.
Avarm
Book was in good condition.
Mpapa
Is the liberalism that claims to fight the subjugation of others truly a colonial mentality that suppresses ethnic identity when it clashes with liberal ideas? "Equality for everyone, as long as we exist within 'reasonable' boundaries of similarness"? That's the question posed by this text when the religions and ethnic identity's of Shahid, a Pakistani Muslim living in Britain, clashes with his own liberal ideals, love of literature, and freedom of expression.

The story also includes a fantastic romance between Shahid and his professor Deedee, however the strength of the text is in analyzing this apparent contradiction of liberalism which advocates for the rights of everyone but excludes certain practices and ideologies that may be essential for maintaining and asserting ethnic identity. The commentary on this issue is fully featured and dense, leaning towards modern western liberal ideas but not completely vindicating them for this oversight of exclusion. Kureishi doesn't endorse religious fundamentalism, but he certainly seems to respect the right of individuals to express their ethnic identity as they see fit. The text reflects that both well-meaning western liberalism and positive ethnic expression can go wrong if they're intolerant and violent, and the story shows the slippery slope that exists where both mentalities can lead to ruin.
Thorgaginn
But pretty tasty. Shahid is not as interesting as the hero in Buddha (forget his name) was. He's not as smart, doesn't have as much gusto to know and love and live in the world, he's not as daring, but he's good. Furthermore the supporting characters, unlike the father and the rock star from Buddha, are all caracatures, some of which intially show promise, like his neighbor, the leader of a fanatical Muslim group, who originally shows an understanding passionate ear to Shahid, but then all but disappears or becomes a complete mockery. He could have been better. If Shahid was looking for brotherhood and found something attractive in the group, it is never explored. He never seems to care, not care, agree, or disagree, and I don't know whether this was Kureishi's point, or if the book was just poorly written. His lover lacks depth, as does his brother. The drugdealer proves to be boring and not worth reading, and then finally, his family history, his place, is never explored. Nothing is resolved, its a sitcom-type of comedy, but it is often a fun read. The raves and the chases and the experiences are all quite easy and fun to read, but the story never takes off like Buddha. I guess it stays closer to home, its a little more realistic, but overall, the book is much weaker than Buddha of Suburbia.
Todal
Yet another winner from Hanif Kureishi as he delves deep into the world of drugs, music and adolescent confusion within the
world of a group of Asian college students. Taking the title from a Prince album, Kureishi explores the interrelations between a
working class Asian student heavily influenced by literature and his revolutionary, English lecturer with whom he begins an affair.This is counterbalanced by the threats of an uprising amongst his fellow students who seek to defend themselves against the prejudice they see within neighbouring communities.
In a titanic struggle, Shahid Hasan must choose between his friends and his lover, both of whom are cast in the revolutionary
lights yet in radically different ways. Just as in The Buddha of Suburbia, Kureishi's own literary and musical tastes are revealed
yet this also shows what can go wrong when one person takes it on themselves to embody the opinions of the majority. The
result sees the boundaries of class and identity become tragically blurred amongst a haze of pills, alcohol and teenage outrage.
Once again Kureishi reinforces his position as one of the best non-British writers in British literature with a rollercoaster novel which moves between the deadly serious and wickedly funny, true genius.
Gavigamand
Funny, how much of the review I hear from folk, have been about the Indian, Pakistan, Islamic tinge on the book. Yea, it's good and stuff that he's writing about that, while much of the mainstream media still shows the myth of London in the 'Notting Hill' Film image (Damm, I use to squat there in the 80's, so I was never more than 5 minutes away from my Saltfish, Redstrip, Dub plates). But for me the strongest images are of the white folks in the book. I remember coming across SO MANY self proclaimed liberal lefties like Hanif covers in the book. Middle class English folk, who really want to make things better for us, colonials as long as they are in charge. This smug paternalistic attitude (gosh, the BBC just came to my mind) jumps out at you in funny funny incidents. In this novel, I reckon the 'anthropologists lense' (come on now, many do read his book to get an insider's glimse of a world they see a closed to them) is turned on the 'anthroplogists' themselves pretty well. This would explain why one of my friends reacted badly to it, ragging on about how she especially dislike 'that woman professor in the book' - For me, that female lecturer Hanif depicts was typical of my 'multiculti' friend.