Download The Sopranos fb2

by Alan Warner
Download The Sopranos fb2
British & Irish
  • Author:
    Alan Warner
  • ISBN:
    0374266700
  • ISBN13:
    978-0374266707
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Farrar Straus & Giroux; 1st American ed edition (April 1, 1999)
  • Pages:
    323 pages
  • Subcategory:
    British & Irish
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1849 kb
  • ePUB format
    1408 kb
  • DJVU format
    1843 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    764
  • Formats:
    lit rtf txt mbr


The Sopranos, Alan Warner's exploration of the lives of several teenage girls in the big city is fantastic.

The Sopranos, Alan Warner's exploration of the lives of several teenage girls in the big city is fantastic. The young women explore the grimy underside of life-barhopping, getting picked up by sleazy older men-while maturing in the process. One must face an unwanted pregnancy, while another, the truth about her sexuality.

Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. The Sopranos Cycle #1).

The Sopranos is a 1998 novel by Scottish writer Alan Warner. It won the Saltire Society's 1998 Scottish Book of the Year Award

The Sopranos is a 1998 novel by Scottish writer Alan Warner. It won the Saltire Society's 1998 Scottish Book of the Year Award. The novel was adapted by Lee Hall with the title Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour for a National Theatre of Scotland and Live Theatre, Newcastle, tour in 2015. The novel has been adapted by Alan Sharp and Michael Caton-Jones for the screen titled Our Ladies and released in 2019 and directed by Michael Caton-Jones.

Alan Warner (born 1964) is a Scottish novelist who grew up in Connel, near Oban

Alan Warner (born 1964) is a Scottish novelist who grew up in Connel, near Oban

Like Irvine Welsh, Warner uses Scottish slang.

It was a good read and well written. Like Irvine Welsh, Warner uses Scottish slang.

Alan Warner - The Sopranos. 8 people like this topic.

The Sopranos (Paperback). Alan Warner (author). This is the most profound of Warner's books.

This is the most profound of Warner's books. His sense of place and atmosphere remains extraordinarily intense".

Now a sell-out play: our ladies of perpetual succour. The choir from Our Lady of Perpetual Succour School for Girls is being bussed to the national finals in the big, big city. Humane, unique, a page-turner with a neat series of bombshells at the end".

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Teenage girls, Female friendship, Choirs (Music), Bildungsromans. New York : Farrar, Straus, and Giroux. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Uploaded by sf-loadersive. org on February 9, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

A trip to the big city for the national singing finals becomes a saga of adolescent debauchery for members of the choir from Our Lady of Perpetual Succour School for Girls, especially for the sopranos, for whom such treats as pub crawling, shoplifting, and body piercing are top priorities

Aiata
The Sopranos, Alan Warner's exploration of the lives of several teenage girls in the big city is fantastic. The young women explore the grimy underside of life--barhopping, getting picked up by sleazy older men--while maturing in the process. One must face an unwanted pregnancy, while another, the truth about her sexuality. The six girls we follow have a depth of true to life emotions that they must handle. Because of their youth, all mishandle, in some way or other, these emotions. The writing here is fabulous--funny, exhuberant and energetic. The young women are all completely believable. This book will definitely transport you to the insecurities and the excitement of being young, thinking you can conquer the world. Highly recommended.
Yalone
If this isn't the best novel out of Europe this year, I'll eat my hat. This would make a hell of a movie! The characters are real, the plot develops with amazing skill, and it's as raunchy and side-splittingly funny as anything Irvine Walsh has done. The drunken debauchery and fun-crazed attitude of the teenage heroines of this story will make your eyes pop. Flaming zambucas and a large tray of tequila shots all round!
Anen
Just finished reading a signed copy of this that I've had knocking around since it first came out. Have the feeling that I would have liked it more after it had first came out... But back then the fact that their was no quotations for the dialogue put me off - to be fair it still took a little getting used to. Quotations and punctuation are there to tell the narrative apart from the dialogue. Its a proven method - why change it? Pretension?... If I was to be cynical then I'd say that if Warner hadn't been found by the publishing world then they would have had to create him. After the success of fellow Scot Irvine Welsh the public were hungry for another writer, experimental, concerned with youth culture, drugs and alcohol and inner city liiving. And most importantly one from Scotland. A bit like how Nesbo had to be dug up to cream off Larsen's success. But now the fad is Norway.
The novel follows the life of a number of teenage convent school girls over the course of a few days. A trip to the capital, lots of alcohol, boyfriends, girlfriends, parties, drinks, etc. Well written with a good ear for dialogue the novel is valuable as a social document. It just seems thess typed of books date too quickly to ever be considered classics.
Cherry The Countess
The most recent, and probably most entertaining of Warner's three books (see also Morven Callar and These Demented Lands) set in a small town on the Scottish coast, it's probably also the least demanding read and most self-conciouslessly commercial of them. Warner shares two stylistic forms with his more famous countryman, Irvine Welsh: ultra-realistic dialogue with a rhythm and vocabulary all its own, and a tendency to write in fragments, scenes, and flashbacks to build the overall narrative. As in his previous books, the narrative here is about the oppressiveness and boredom of youth living in a small town. The book chronicles the adventures of six foul-mouthed, bawdy, and misbehavin' teenage Catholic choir girls as they take a day trip to Edinburgh to compete in a nationwide choral competition. Released to the big city the girls set sights on booze, clothes and men--with mostly predictable results, rendered in enjoyable episodes by Warner. Fun stuff, but the underlying air of desperation to grasp a good time, makes this more than a mere mildly titillating romp with youth. The dull fate that inescapably awaits these girls in adulthood make this a poignant and memorable tale.
Whitegrove
This work is as poignant a social comment as any I have recently read.
This novel turns an intimate spotlight on the plight of bored, rudderless Scottish schoolgirls trapped in a featureless port town whose only respite from the numbing drudgery of their existence is achieved through an astonishingly excessive alcohol intake and sex acts devoid even of affection.
The British quality press all say how funny this book is, with epithets like "wickedly funny" (Independent) and "riotously funny" (The Times). Yes there are some amusing slapstick scenes but this book is not purely a comedy.
This in an excellent novel. One starts with a certain mild distaste as one is introduced to the main protagonists but as time and the story progress one is drawn in to a realization of how these girls have been abandoned by our social culture and put-upon by their draconian and misguided school. This leads to a certain affection for these individuals, and their dispair (though most do not acknowledge it) becomes very tangible.
Perhaps the most telling observation is from a young lad who befriends one of the girls whose thought is "These chicks are the damaged goods."
Through the use of quirky spelling and a startling lack of punctuation (which take a little getting used to), the author captures with remarkable accuracy the girls' brash but amusing dialogue and the reader is left in no doubt that he is absolutely in touch with the sub-culture of that environment. The girls meet their situation with riotous rebellion and a dry humour that is very amusing, if not touching.
Especially well drawn is the discovery of a true sense of love in one of the girls, an emotion clearly previously unknown to her and one which leads her to a very courageous public stance.
This is the first book by Alan Warner that I have read. It certainly won't be the last.