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by Daniel Fox
Download Jade Man's Skin (Moshui: The Books of Stone and Water) fb2
Action & Adventure
  • Author:
    Daniel Fox
  • ISBN:
    034550304X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0345503046
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Del Rey (February 16, 2010)
  • Pages:
    432 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Action & Adventure
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1425 kb
  • ePUB format
    1280 kb
  • DJVU format
    1834 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    236
  • Formats:
    azw docx mobi lrf


Book 2 of 3 in the Moshui, the Books of Stone and Water Series.

Book 2 of 3 in the Moshui, the Books of Stone and Water Series. But there's no need to wait for the final book to come out, as "Jade Man's Skin" offers enough intermediate resolution of plot threads to leave a reader feeling satisfied while still wanting to hear the end of the story.

Jade Man's Skin is the second book of Moshui: The Books of Stone and Water, a series set in an. .Before this he had published a couple of dozen books and many hundreds of short stories, under a clutch of other names. He has also written poetry and plays

Jade Man's Skin is the second book of Moshui: The Books of Stone and Water, a series set in an alternate China where dragons are real and jade has. He has also written poetry and plays. Some of this work has won awards. Библиографические данные. Jade Man's Skin Moshui: The Books of Stone and Water (Том 2).

Jade Man's Skin is the second book of Moshui: The Books of Stone and Water, a series set in an alternate China .

Jade Man's Skin is the second book of Moshui: The Books of Stone and Water, a series set in an alternate China where dragons are real and jade has. Daniel Fox is a British writer who first went to Taiwan at the millennium and became obsessed, to the point of learning Mandarin and writing about the country in three different genres.

Book 2. Jade Man's Skin. In this soaring epic, Daniel Fox weaves th. ore. Shelve Jade Man's Skin.

By daniel fox. Dragon in Chains. The books of stone and water. They were mostly those who claimed to have seen a dragon also, rising from the water and destroying all the boats. Not much lies within my gift, but this does. This book is for you. You know who you are. Dragon’s Flight. Others had seen a storm, no more than that, a darkness on the horizon. Wilding or weather, he was almost sure that the invasion had been launched and met catastrophe. He couldn’t be certain until he saw the wreckage or heard from Tunghai Wang; but the generalissimo should have trusted the signal.

Jade Man's Skin book. It's hard to describe this book, second in "Moshui, The Books of Stone and Water" in anything less than superlatives. It's a rare second book (the first being Dragon in Chains) that stands so well on its own. There's no trace of "middle book syndrome," the let-down of a volume that is essentially all development. Jade Man's Skin has its own integrity, gorgeous prose, action that ranges from subtle to gritty to expansive.

In this soaring epic, Daniel Fox weaves the ancient myths and legends of feudal China into a fantasy world of brutal war and brittle passion, immortal gods and mystical creatures. With the long-chained dragon now free and the rebels’ invasion smashed by her exultant fury, the balance of power has changed. Young emperor Chien Hua is no longer struggling for survival; now he is ambitious to strike back. As treacherous General Ping Wen whispers in the emperor’s ear, not even Chien Hua’s beloved concubine or his most trusted bodyguard can reason with him.

Moshui, The Books of Stone and Water 02 - Jade Man's Skin Building on the brilliantly subtle groundwork laid in 2009 's Dragon in Chains, Fox 's Chinese fantasy series continues as the. Publication. Readers who enjoyed Fox's delicate descriptions and leisurely prose will be thrilled to find more of the same, along with greater depth of story as the numerous characters are pulled together by schemes and destiny. Dear user! You need to be registered and logged in to fully enjoy Englishtips.

Moshui: the Books of Stone and Water. In this soaring epic, Daniel Fox weaves the ancient myths and legends of feudal China into a fantasy world of brutal war and brittle passion, immortal gods and mystical creatures. With the long-chained dragon now free and the rebels' invasion smashed by her exultant fury, the balance of power has changed. As treacherous General Ping Wen whispers in the emperor's ear, not even Chien Hua's beloved concubine or his most trusted bodyguard can reason with him.

Jade Man's Skin - (Moshui: The Books of Stone and Water) by Daniel Fox (Paperback). Daniel Fox, author of Into the Dark at the On Point Book Fair held in Tampa, Florida; home to a diverse community of authors. Street Style Outfits Men Denim Blazer Daniel Magic Fox Daniel Fox Paris Street Men Street Saint Laurent Boots Mens Fashion Shoes Fashion Outfits. Daniel Fox - Streets of Paris. Daniel Fox Losing Her. Hidden Cities - (Moshui: The Books of Stone and Water) by Daniel Fox (Paperback). The annual showcase encompasses. On Point Executive Center.

In this soaring epic, Daniel Fox weaves the ancient myths and legends of feudal China into a fantasy world of brutal war and brittle passion, immortal gods and mystical creatures. With the long-chained dragon now free and the rebels’ invasion smashed by her exultant fury, the balance of power has changed. Young emperor Chien Hua is no longer struggling for survival; now he is ambitious to strike back. As treacherous General Ping Wen whispers in the emperor’s ear, not even Chien Hua’s beloved concubine or his most trusted bodyguard can reason with him. Worse, prolonged exposure to magical jade is changing him radically: His increasingly godlike powers are making him dangerously rash.But with the dragon patrolling the skies above and the strait beneath, the emperor’s forces have no hope of launching a counterattack—until a goddess moves to interfere. Yet neither the clash of armies nor the opposing wills of goddess and dragon can decide ultimate victory or defeat. The fate of the war lies in the blood-deep bonds between the dragon and the boy Han, her jailer and her liberator—and in the prices both will pay for their freedom.

Rasmus
The Dragon in Chains is no longer locked in the Straits of Taishu. Instead she soars in the sky free with an obsession to take her vengeance on those who chained it. However, the beast has not been able to rid itself of her liberator, Han the apprentice scribe who remains telepathically tied to the dragon.

At the same the exiled young Emperor remains alive because of the dragon, but also feels like a bird in a gilded cage as he is trapped in the mountains of Taishu Island by his enemies and the beast. He is changing due to jade exposure that leaves him more powerful, angrier and frustrated as he no longer wants to hide in the mountains. His first step back is taking control of the city of Taishu as the Emperor strikes back. General Ping Wen believes capturing the Jade Throne is his first step to what he should be - Godhood. Besides counting his losses over the years, pirate Captain Li Ton tries to take over the military as the civil war continues unabated. The exiled Emperor's favorite concubine Lady Mei Feng is also in the mix cleverly out maneuvering the ambitious general. However, out of the sea comes the Li-Goddess who comes after the dragon, but collateral damage of people is no concern to her.

The second medieval fantasy captures the essence of Chinese mythology with an even deeper more complicated tale than the Dragon in Chains. The story line is fast-paced with several subplots brewing as various individuals want power; some want godhood power. The point of view changes, but never slows down as the dragon unchained is a strong tale as the conflict expands.

Harriet Klausner
Vichredag
Thank you for your timely delivery! This is a very good series. Great detail. Has the ability to transport you to another world.
Zacki
Why are the second books of trilogies so difficult? Jade Man's Skin is the second book of Moshui: The Books of Stone and Water, a series set in an alternate China where dragons are real and jade has the power to make an emperor nearly invincible. I greatly enjoyed Dragon in Chains, the first in this series. And I can't say that I didn't enjoy Jade Man's Skin; only that I enjoyed it less. It seems to start somewhere and end somewhere, but there is a great deal of chatter in between.

The dragon inhabiting the strait between the mainland of the empire (which is clearly China, though it is not given a name) and Taishu (which appears to be Taiwan in our world) has been mostly unchained, but is not entirely free. Not only is she somehow bound to the boy, Han, whose own chains, once stricken, unleashed the dragon, but she is also forbidden to act whenever she chooses by the goddess of the strait, the Li-goddess. The Li-goddess's sympathies appear to lie with the young emperor, Chien Hua, but that is not entirely clear; indeed, it seems that her sympathies are most explicitly with the fisherman, Old Yen, the grandfather of Mei Ling, who is the emperor's first - and so far, only - concubine.

Almost everyone is at odds with everyone else in this chapter of Fox's trilogy. General Ping Wen wants the emperor's throne, but he is ostensibly the emperor's principal protector at the moment, the one in charge of the armed forces who remain loyal to Chien Hua. Tunghai Wang, the soldier who led the rebellion again the emperor that forced him to flee to Taishu, does not know of Ping Wen's ambitions, but relies upon him to assassinate the emperor. Mei Ling and the emperor's mother know of Ping Wen's treachery, but are unable to convince the emperor, who wants to follow Ping Wen's advice to launch an assault on the mainland.

Yes, there are many different characters and story arcs to keep track of in this book. Some characters who played significant roles in Dragon in Chains, such as the jade master, Guangli, and the pirate, Li Ton, have only walk-on roles here, as the epic grows beyond what can be contained in a single volume. New characters appear, like the eunuch Jung, and Siew Ren, of whom we only heard tangentially in the first book. It soon becomes difficult to remember who everyone is in this vast cast of characters. It is difficult to pay the close attention necessary to keep everyone in his or her place, as the story sags under its own weight and, it must be said, even becomes boring through the middle half of the book. Things pick up considerably as we approach the final battle, but until then, there is much squabbling and talking with little action, and little resolved.

This is so common in trilogies that it is almost not worth reporting. But one must wonder: why do writers write trilogies if they don't have enough story to fill two books? Why not write a duology and keep it exciting throughout? I'm quite sure that the answer is simply financial, the theory being that three books will earn more money than two, but (while I am not privy to publishing figures on the question) I tend to doubt that that is the case. Surely readers who are disappointed in the second book will not buy the third.

I enjoy that Fox's trilogy is sent in the Far East, a culture with which I have little familiarity, either in life or in fiction (or even in fantasy). I enjoy the magic system at work here, and I particularly enjoy the realization that Chinese dragons do not have wings, though they fly. Think about the depictions of Chinese dragons you've seen on scrolls or kimonos; no wings, see? For all my life, that has eluded me somehow, and now it's clear to me that Chinese dragons seem to swim through the air, flying by a means of propulsion unknown in the West. Even if I did not enjoy the problems that arise in the romance between Mei Feng and Chien Hua (though I did); even if I did not enjoy Chung's romantic dilemma (though I did); even if I were not interested in Han's relationship with the dragon (though I was); I would find the time I put into reading this book repaid by this new knowledge of Chinese dragons. Sometimes the smallest details can enchant completely. And certainly, any trilogy will provide any reader with a plethora of details; it only takes one to fascinate.
WUNDERKIND
Disclaimer: Daniel Fox is a friend of mine. However, I didn't review the book just because he's a friend -- I whined shamelessly for an ARC because having read the first book in the trilogy, I very badly wanted to read the next one as soon as it was available in edited form, rather than waiting until it was on sale.

~~~

Daniel Fox keeps up the quality and the pace in the second volume of his fantasy trilogy inspired by mediaeval China. The first volume, "Dragon In Chains", told the tale of the boy Emperor's flight from a rebel army, and the stories of some of those touched by the war. Now the Emperor has reached safety on the remote island of Taishu on the very fringe of the Empire.

Taishu may be remote, but no would-be usurper can afford to leave the Emperor there in exile. The island holds the jade mines that are the source of imperial power -- and in this world, that isn't just symbolic. This volume explores in greater depth the subtle magic that underpins imperial rule. And there is more than imperial magic. There are other intelligences in this world, and the human forces which are arrayed against one another are starting to learn just what it means to tangle such creatures into human battles.

It's hard to review this book in any depth without giving major spoilers for the first one (which I've reviewed previously), because this trilogy really is a single novel in three volumes, not a series of three interlinked novels. But what I can say is that it follows each of the major characters and threads from the first volume, developing each strand of the story in a satisfying way. This is no wish-fulfillment story wherein the Hero is noble simply because he is the Hero, but a careful consideration of the cumulative effects of power -- on those who have it, whether in name only or in reality, on those who desire it, and on those who are simply in its path. And like the first volume, it neither flinches from showing the horror of war, nor wallows in gratuituous gore.

This is a complex story with equally complex characters, which genuinely needs the three volumes to do justice to the tales it has to tell. But it's beautifully constructed, and told in stunningly good prose. If you've not read the first book, don't start with this one. It really is worth your while finding "Dragon in Chains" and reading that first, not least because part of the pleasure is watching how the characters are changing and growing in response to the upheavals in their world. But there's no need to wait for the final book to come out, as "Jade Man's Skin" offers enough intermediate resolution of plot threads to leave a reader feeling satisfied while still wanting to hear the end of the story. Go buy them now -- this series is breathtaking, in concepts, in story and in prose.