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by Tom Wolfe
Download The Right Stuff: Illustrated fb2
Engineering
  • Author:
    Tom Wolfe
  • ISBN:
    1579124585
  • ISBN13:
    978-1579124588
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Black Dog & Leventhal; Illustrated edition (2004)
  • Pages:
    304 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Engineering
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1276 kb
  • ePUB format
    1739 kb
  • DJVU format
    1992 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    535
  • Formats:
    lit mbr lrf doc


It was. I’d forgotten much of what had been covered in Tom Wolfe’s book, but the added perspective of some 30 plus years gives new resonance to his take on our space program and politics of that period

It was. I’d forgotten much of what had been covered in Tom Wolfe’s book, but the added perspective of some 30 plus years gives new resonance to his take on our space program and politics of that period. Through my work, I had the chance to meet with Pete Conrad in the early 90’s. He is the first pilot/astronaut that he introduces in his book, and uses his life to introduce the reader to what it takes to have the Right Stuff. He was not chosen in the first group of Astronauts, but in the second.

The Right Stuff is a 1979 book by Tom Wolfe about the pilots engaged in .

Tom Wolfe began The Right Stuff at a time when it was unfashionable to contemplate American heroism. Certainly The Right Stuff is the best, the funniest, and the most vivid book ever written about America's manned space program. Nixon had left the White House in disgrace, the nation was reeling from the catastrophe of Vietnam, and in 1979-the year the book appeared-Americans were being held hostage by Iranian militants. Yet it was exactly the anachronistic courage of his subjects that captivated Tom Wolfe began The Right Stuff at a time when it was unfashionable to contemplate American heroism.

This book grew out of some ordinary curiosity

This book grew out of some ordinary curiosity. What is it, I wondered, that makes a man willing to sit up on top of an enormous Roman candle, such as a Redstone, Atlas, Titan, or Saturn rocket, and wait for someone to light the fuse? I decided on the simplest approach possible. The Right Stuff became the story of why men were witting-witting?-delighted!-to take on such odds in this, an era literary people had long since characterized as the age of the anti-hero. Such was the psychological mystery that animated me in the writing of this book.

It is this, the inner life of the astronauts, that Tom Wolfe describes with his almost uncanny empathetic powers, that made The Right Stuff a classic.

Millions of words have poured forth about man's trip to the moon, but until now few people have had a sense of the most engrossing side of the adventure; namely, what went on in the minds of the astronauts themselves - in space, on the moon, and even during certain odysseys on earth. It is this, the inner life of the astronauts, that Tom Wolfe describes with his almost uncanny empathetic powers, that made The Right Stuff a classic

A wonderful novel and perfect book club choice, The Right Stuff is a wildly vivid and entertaining chronicle of America's .

A wonderful novel and perfect book club choice, The Right Stuff is a wildly vivid and entertaining chronicle of America's early space programme. With an introduction by us astronaut scott kelly. and wait for someone to light the fuse?’ Arrogance? Stupidity? Courage? Or, simply, that quality we call 'the right stuff'?

Wolfe To. om Wolfe The Right Stuff Foreword This book originated with some ordinary, curiosity.

Wolfe To. This book originated with some ordinary, curiosity.

by. Wolfe, Tom. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities. The angels - The right stuff - Yeager - The lab rat - In single combat - On the balcony - The Cape - The thrones - The vote - Righteous prayer - The unscrewable pooch - The tears - The operational stuff - The club - The high. A narrative of the early days of the . space program and the people who made it happen, including Chuck Yeager, Pete Conrad, Gus Grissom, and John Glenn. Internet Archive Books.

552 Pages · 2012 · . 1 MB · 16 Downloads ·English. Don't Sweat the Small Stuff Workbook. 12 MB·20,589 Downloads.

The Right Stuff Illustrated includes hundreds of photographs and reproductions of documents and . Tom Wolfe is the author of a dozen books, among them such contemporary classics as The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test and The Bonfire of the Vanities

The Right Stuff Illustrated includes hundreds of photographs and reproductions of documents and memorabilia pertaining to the Project Mercury program, the current events surrounding the program, and the political climate that led up to the missions in the early 1960's. It's the perfect gift book for lovers of history and the space program, as well as the millions of fans of The Right Stuff. Format Hardback 304 pages. Tom Wolfe is the author of a dozen books, among them such contemporary classics as The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test and The Bonfire of the Vanities. His most recent bestseller is I Am Charlotte Simmons (Nov.

First published in 1979 to extraordinary acclaim, Tom Wolfe’s landmark work became an instant bestseller, going on to sell more than 2.5 million copies. It is a true story that is as exciting as the best fiction—the tale of American heroes Yeager, Conrad, Grissom, and Glenn—men who were willing to put their lives on the line in pursuit of the final frontier. With stunning accuracy and captivating prose, Wolfe recounts the details of the lives of these men, their families, and of NASA’s Project Mercury program. The result is a vivid history that could only be enhanced by actual historic photographs. The Right Stuff Illustrated includes hundreds of photographs and reproductions of documents and memorabilia pertaining to the Project Mercury program, the current events surrounding the program, and the political climate that led up to the missions in the early 1960’s. It’s the perfect gift book for lovers of history and the space program, as well as the millions of fans of The Right Stuff.

Samutilar
After seeing the movie numerous times, I thought it was time to finally read the book. Although sometimes the language can be colorful and literary, overall I could not put it down, and finished it in just a few days.
Kerdana
Bonfire of the Vanities has made me a Tom Wolfe fan. It paints a truthful picture of late 20th Century morality. There are no heroes in this book. The egos and dark flaws of its characters are on display for the world to read. Who knows? You might find a bit of yourself in this classic. I don't consider myself a student of literature, but I'd be surprised if this book wasn't required reading for literature majors, or perhaps social studies and first year law students . It's a great read.
Wooden Purple Romeo
After 30 years it still resonates -- kind of sad really. Excellent read, for "readers," not for those who like snippet type reading. Only beef. Why of all possible endings did he choose this one?! Very unsatisfying after a substantial commitment to the story. Feels like he rushed the ending.
Thorgaginn
This book is about the Mercury Project, NASA’s first manned space missions, and the origins of the astronaut program.

Tom Wolfe was a practitioner of “New Journalism.” The only previous experience that I had with that style was with Hunter S. Thompson’s alcohol-and-other-drugs-fueled escapades in Las Vegas while covering a race for Sports Illustrated and his alcohol-fueled experiences at the Kentucky Derby. Based on those reading experiences, it was my understanding that one of the hallmarks of New Journalism was Journalist-as-Participant. The historical record, however, is pretty clear that a drunk Tom Wolfe had not, in fact, been blasted into orbit with John Glenn or any of the other Mercury 7 astronauts. How then is The Right Stuff an example New Journalism?

Well, Tom Wolfe wrote his butt off. The book reads more “literary” than as an object of traditional journalism. Let me explain…no, there is too much…let me sum up…A traditional journalistic or scholarly book about the early astronauts and “what made them tick” might include quotations from interviews with those astronauts and people that knew them, government officials and news reporters from the time, and maybe a few academics to provide some Authoritative Interpretation. The writer wouldn’t put forth a theory of their own about the astronaut motivations, or, if they did, there’d be a ton of explicit sources backing them up.

Tom Wolfe just puts his theories out there, front and center, and then writes with such force – with repeated interjections, sometimes with exclamations! – and capitalizations and callbacks and pretty descriptions and literary techniques that the reader will forget that they are reading some nonfiction book; this story may be (at least in some sense) true, but it reads like a novel. It never really dives into the minutiae of bureaucratic organization nor is it really interested in any one’s point of view other than that which drives the author’s central point: the astronauts were military test pilots fueled by a Manly Competitive Desire to BE THE BEST and that performing well under pressure in that competition exhibits The Right Stuff (which is never explicitly defined, although I have my own theories).

I am a fan of David Foster Wallace’s writing, and I could see a clear influence from Tom Wolfe’s style in Wallace’s writing. And David Foster Wallace was certainly not the only literary writer influenced by Wolfe. Fans of literature really should check this out, just to trace back certain styles to their creator (or popularizer). Science fiction fans could be inspired by a (more or less) true account of fighter pilot personality and how their influence (or lack thereof) could impact a fictional space program. Fans of nonfiction could see that there are ways of telling a nonfiction story rather than the usual, traditional methodologies. I’d recommend this book to anyone, just with the disclaimer that it is NOT like the usual biographical or documentary-style rendition of the Mercury Project. The writer’s style is definitely noticeable, and some might be distracted by it (or it could just not be to their taste).
Tujar
The Right Stuff is the story of 7 men chosen for the Mercury space program and also about the life of Chuck Yeager, a very talented test pilot. Most of the story takes place from the late 50's when the U.S. was in a race with Russia to reach outer space. There was a lot of pressure on the U.S. because Russia had already sent out the first manned space flight. Personally I liked the story a lot, it was very interesting, but I feel like the story spent a lot of time around things that were not important to the progression of the story. Examples of this is when they are all sitting around at their hangout, not really doing anything. The characters were very interesting though, at first they were kind of low down and rowdy, but as the story progresses they end up much more mature and helpful to each other. I learned a lot from this book, such as: Who broke the sound barrier first, who the first to go into space were, and how they all got there. I would recommend this book to those who are looking for an interesting story about the advancement of our current technology.
BroWelm
This book doesn't need a recommendation from me. I'll just comment on the Kindle production of it, which was good. I mention this because comments about typos in the Kindle version of Wolfe's The Right Stuff made me cautious about buying that book, and the sample indeed had obvious errors, so I will only read that in a printed copy.
Zepavitta
Very entertaining. I reread this in memory of Tom Wolfe and it is very good and still pertinent to our times. He is the best at setting scenes, dialogue and social commentary . I highly recommend this book if you have not read Tom Wolfe before now.
Written in his inimitable droll style Tom Wolfe in this novel pits the mores of the haves of the right upper Manhattan addresses against those of the have nots of the Bronx, all manipulated by the power structure of the over burdened judicial system as it seeks to maintain some sense of order, while pointing out the sort of corruption that can thrive in each segment of society.