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by M. Granger Morgan,Jon M. Peha
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Engineering
  • Author:
    M. Granger Morgan,Jon M. Peha
  • ISBN:
    1891853740
  • ISBN13:
    978-1891853746
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Routledge; 1 edition (September 10, 2003)
  • Pages:
    228 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Engineering
  • Language:
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    4.6
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Granger Morgan and Jon Peha begin with an overview of the use of technical information in framing policy issues .

Granger Morgan and Jon Peha begin with an overview of the use of technical information in framing policy issues, crafting legislation, and the overall process of governing. They note how, as nonexperts, legislators must make decisions in the face of scientific uncertainty and competing scientific claims from stakeholders. The contributors continue with a discussion of why OTA was created. They draw lessons from OTA's demise, and compare the use of science and technological information in Europe with the United States

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Read instantly in your browser. by M. Granger Morgan (Author), Jon M. Peha (Author). ISBN-13: 978-1891853746. M. Granger Morgan is professor and head of the Department of Engineering and Public Policy, Lord Chair Professor in Engineering, professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and professor in the H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management at Carnegie Mellon University. The elimination of the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) in 1995 came during a storm of budget cutting and partisan conflict. Operationally, it left Congress without an institutional arrangement to bring expert scientific and technological advice into the process of legislative decisionmaking.

Granger Morgan and Jon Peha begin with an overview of the use of technical information in framing policy issues, crafting legislation, and the overall process of. .Books related to Science and Technology Advice for Congress. Just Business: Multinational Corporations and Human Rights (Norton Global Ethics Series).

M. Granger Morgan and Jon M. Peha, Science and Technology Advice for Congress, RFF Press, 2003. Jon M. Peha, "Robots, Telework, and the Jobs of the Future," Science, Volume 363, Number 6422, pp. 38, January 2019. Papers in Journals and Books of Refereed Papers. Alexandre Ligo and Jon M. Peha, "Cost-Effectiveness of Sharing Roadside Infrastructure for Internet of Vehicles," IEEE Transactions on Intelligent Transportation Systems, Volume 19, Issue 7, July 2018, pp. 2362-2372.

Granger Morgan, "Congress Needs an Adviser on Technology," Newsday, p. A34, June 27, 2001. William Schulz, "Advising Congress: Holt introduces legislation to reestablish Congress’ Office of Technology Assessment," Chemical & Engineering News, p. 29, July 23, 2001. Peha, "The Growing Debate Over Science and Technology Advice for Congress," Communications of the ACM, 2001. Bill Tammeus, "Flying Blind on Science," Kansas City Star, September 01, p. B7, 2002. Table of Contents of the book Science and Technology Advice to the Congress (M. Granger Morgan and Jon Peha, ed. now under contract at RFF Press.

Granger Morgan and Jon Peha begin with an overview of the use of technical information in framing policy issues . For 23 years OTA completed reports on virtually all science and technology subject faced by the Congress until the agency's annual appropriation of funds to operate was eliminated in 1995 as one of a series of budget austerity measures. This paper recaps the OTA experience and recent efforts to fill the gap since OTA's closure.

Washington: RFF Press, 2003. An examination of the U. S. Congress’s evolving need for scientific and technical advice, the inherent difficulties in fulfilling this need, and a historical assessment of the mechanisms put in place to provide the legislative branch with independent technical counsel. Placing Environmental History on Display. They draw lessons from OTA's demise, and compare the use of science and technological information in Europe with the United States.

The elimination of the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) in 1995 came during a storm of budget cutting and partisan conflict. Operationally, it left Congress without an institutional arrangement to bring expert scientific and technological advice into the process of legislative decisionmaking. This deficiency has become increasingly critical, as more and more of the decisions faced by Congress and society require judgments based on highly specialized technical information. Offering perspectives from scholars and scientists with diverse academic backgrounds and extensive experience within the policy process, Science and Technology Advice for Congress breaks from the politics of the OTA and its contentious aftermath. Granger Morgan and Jon Peha begin with an overview of the use of technical information in framing policy issues, crafting legislation, and the overall process of governing. They note how, as nonexperts, legislators must make decisions in the face of scientific uncertainty and competing scientific claims from stakeholders. The contributors continue with a discussion of why OTA was created. They draw lessons from OTA's demise, and compare the use of science and technological information in Europe with the United States. The second part of the book responds to requests from congressional leaders for practical solutions. Among the options discussed are expanded functions within existing agencies such as the General Accounting or Congressional Budget Offices; an independent, NGO- administrated analysis group; and a dedicated successor to OTA within Congress. The models emphasize flexibility--and the need to make political feasibility a core component of design.