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by Stephen J. Pyne
Download Voyager: Seeking Newer Worlds in the Third Great Age of Discovery fb2
Engineering
  • Author:
    Stephen J. Pyne
  • ISBN:
    0670021830
  • ISBN13:
    978-0670021833
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Viking; First Edition edition (July 22, 2010)
  • Pages:
    464 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Engineering
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1673 kb
  • ePUB format
    1371 kb
  • DJVU format
    1991 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    447
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The juxtaposition of the first two great ages of discovery with the third (culminating in the Voyager mission) is a logical comparison, but Pyne's attempt falls far short of enjoyable

The juxtaposition of the first two great ages of discovery with the third (culminating in the Voyager mission) is a logical comparison, but Pyne's attempt falls far short of enjoyable. The chief offense of our purportedly award-winning author is that he forces this loosely braided narrative down the reader's throat with no regard to it's success.

Mission Statement: Voyager of Discovery Of course that sentiment was never alone sufficient to justify such costly . The Voyagers are among exploration’s purest expressions, and among both its strangest and its most revelatory.

Mission Statement: Voyager of Discovery. On August 20 and September 5, 1977, two spacecraft, Voyager 2 and Voyager 1, respectively, lifted off atop Titan/ Centaur rockets from Cape Canaveral, Florida, to begin a Grand Tour of the outer planets.

Also by stephen j. pyne

Also by stephen j. pyne. Voice and Vision: A Guide to Writing History and Other Serious Nonfiction (2009). Awful Splendour: A Fire History of Canada (2007). An age will come after many years when the Ocean will loose the chains of things, and a huge land lie revealed; when Tethys will disclose new worlds and Thule no more be the ultimate.

Stephen J. Pyne Stephen J. Pyne is a Regents Professor in the School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University. The 1600s marked the first great age of discovery, with Portugal and Spain fighting for primacy in sea trade

Stephen J. An award-winning environmental historian, he is the author of Year of the Fires, The Ice and How the Canyon Became Grand. He is the recipient of the Robert Kirsch Award from the Los Angeles Times. He lives in Glendale, Arizona. The 1600s marked the first great age of discovery, with Portugal and Spain fighting for primacy in sea trade. In the 18th century, England and France competed to circumnavigate the globe and be the first to measure an arc of the meridian.

Voyager: Seeking Newer Worlds in the Third Great Age of Discovery. IN THE summer of 1977 two American spacecraft were launched on what is arguably the grandest mission ever: the exploration of the outer planets of the solar system and the space that lies beyond. More than three decades later, they have become the farthest man-made objects from Earth, reaching out in the darkness to overtake earlier missions to oblivion.

Launched in 1977, the two unmanned Voyager spacecraft have completed their Grand Tour to the four outer planets, and they are now on course to become the first man-made objects to exit our solar system. In this highly original book, Stephen Pyne recasts Voyager in the tradition of Magellan, Columbus, Cook, Lewis and Clark, and other landmark explorers.

In seeking newer worlds, it bypassed the world that has most mesmerized the imagination of space partisans, that best expresses their . The Second Age secularized those motives and laundered them through the Enlightenment

In seeking newer worlds, it bypassed the world that has most mesmerized the imagination of space partisans, that best expresses their effort to control the direction of Third Age exploration, and that best boils down the motives of those who have most fervently wished to project exploration into space and those who have most doubted its value. The Second Age secularized those motives and laundered them through the Enlightenment. A more aggressive commerce replaced simple plundering, a generalized Civilization substituted for Christendom, and glory softened into national prestige and professional reputation.

Pyne, Stephen . 1949-. Voyager Project, Astronautics, Aeronautics, Planets. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Delaware County District Library (Ohio). Uploaded by w on July 13, 2012.

A third Voyager mission was planned, and then canceled

A third Voyager mission was planned, and then canceled. Apparently, Voyager 3 was cannibalized during construction: I am currently reading the book Voyager: Seeking Newer Worlds In The Third Great Age Of Discovery by Stephen J. On the second chapter, it is listed that there were three Voyager spacecraft. The second Voyager, VGR 77-2 had flaws and it was used for spare parts for Voyager 1 (VGR 77-1) and Voyager 2 (VGR 77-3). At one point, NASA had a Planetary Grand Tour plan that consisted of 4 missions (Mariner 11-14).

As with those earlier journeys, Voyager was motivated by a mix of desires: military, political, economic, and a love of pure discovery.

A brilliant new account of the Voyager space program-its history, scientific impact, and cultural legacy Launched in 1977, the two unmanned Voyager spacecraft have completed their Grand Tour to the four outer planets, and they are now on course to become the first man-made objects to exit our solar system. To many, this remarkable achievement is the culmination of a golden age of American planetary exploration, begun in the wake of the 1957 Sputnik launch. More than this, Voyager may be one of the purest expressions of exploration in human history. For more than five hundred years the West has been powered by the impulse to explore, to push into a wider world. In this highly original book, Stephen Pyne recasts Voyager in the tradition of Magellan, Columbus, Cook, Lewis and Clark, and other landmark explorers. The Renaissance and Enlightenment-the First and Second Ages of Discovery- sent humans across continents and oceans to find new worlds. In the Third Age, expeditions have penetrated the Antarctic ice, reached the floors of the oceans, and traveled to the planets by new means, most spectacularly via semi-autonomous robot. Voyager probes how the themes of motive and reward are stunningly parallel through all three ages. Voyager, which gave us the first breathtaking images of Jupiter and Saturn, changed our sense of our own place in the universe.

Raelin
Stephen Pyne does an excellent job illuminating the nature of modern space exploration. Another area that I will need to read again to understand is the relationship of modern space exploration to past explorers. I think Pyne has captured the science and engineering that went into the Voyager mission very well. He says: Gravity assist was one of dozens of ideas - inventions, if you will - that made Voyager possible. Who invented Voyager? Who invented the Grand Tour?" Read this fascinating and complex book to find answers to those questions.
Dagdarad
I was interested in learning more about the Voyager missions, but I should have done more research on this book & paid attention to the particular part of the title "..and the Third Great Age of Discovery."
The author spends a good amount of pages delving into past explorations (not space, but period). I don't care about those past sailing missions....
I tried to keep up with it, but I eventually tossed the book aside.
Bukelv
Was looking for info on the "gold" records...wasn't much in here, but book was good, somewhat drawn out.
White_Nigga
Alas, I purchased this book thinking it would lay bare everything concerning the two Voyager spacecraft, but instead I'm told about the wonderful color pictures they took (with only a few lame ones shown in black and white), countless comparisons to the great oceangoing explorers in of past centuries, and a few nice Voyager facts. I found it hard to read, and finally just skipped over any paragraph that mentioned Magellan or Vasco De Gama. I found myself looking at the cover to see what the book was titled, in case it was actually called "Explorers Who Died a Long Time Ago".

After finally managing to force my way through it, I checked out NASA's website and Wikipedia where I found loads of facts, pictures, and details. There are some interesting and enlightening Voyager facts mentioned in this book, but far too few for anything longer than a comic book. Hey, I love to read and learn about a very wide variety of subjects, but when you're wanting to learn about a great feat of late 20th century engineering, constantly bringing up the 17th century just becomes annoying.

Ok, I feel better now.
Hugifyn
I bought the book as it was highly touted to be about the Voyager project. It lived up to that billing. It does, however, have a lot of comparisions to historical explorations (Columbus etc) and some were interesting and many I just skipped over. I really enjoyed the details about Voyager though, and how they figured out how to send two spacecraft beyond the solar system with minimal fuel. I now appreciate all the effort that went into this mission. One last tidbit is the fact that they had to deal with the issue of keeping expertise around to support the missions, as they took decades to accomplish. Really interesting.
Samugor
Most readers who get this book will be sorely disappointed and probably feel cheated as I did. The author's primary concern is not about Voyager or even space exploration. He cares a great deal about exploration, yes, but not the kind that uses rocket boosters. His passion is for sailing ships and the book shows his love for them. So this book treats the science of space exploration as a prop to deal with the history of exploration and the philosophy behind exploration. Nothing wrong with those subjects but the way the book promotes itself is an act of deception.
Terr
I really wanted to like this book as the history and science of unmanned space exploration can be an interesting one. But I felt like I've largely been down this road before via Carl Sagan's ground-breaking book Cosmos. While the author provides some interesting information on the two Voyager space probes and their journeys to the outer planets I didn't really learn much of anything new. I would recommend this book to a high school science student who was new to the topic of space exploration. But for anyone who has followed planetary exploration for a while I'd say there are better books and sources of information on the web.
Technical and but very interesting.

I am enjoying it quite a lot.

8 more words to go, not much else to say.