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by Margaret J. Osler
Download Rethinking the Scientific Revolution fb2
Engineering
  • Author:
    Margaret J. Osler
  • ISBN:
    0521661013
  • ISBN13:
    978-0521661010
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Cambridge University Press (March 13, 2000)
  • Pages:
    356 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Engineering
  • Language:
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    1965 kb
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    1366 kb
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    1408 kb
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    4.6
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    561
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ISBN-13: 978-0521667906. The Scientific Revolution still divides historians into those who see it as an undeniably real period of historical change comparable with the Renaissance and the Reformation, and those who see it merely as a term of convenience for historians of science. In this important new collection each of the authors reassesses the Scientific Revolution, some in the widest possible terms, others by focussing upon one episode or one individual, with a view to redressing this problem.

Rethinking the Scientific Revolution. Usually referring to the period from Copernicus to Newton (roughly 1500 to 1700), the Scientific Revolution is considered to be the central episode in the history of science, the historical moment at which that unique way of looking at the world that we call 'modern science' and its attendant institutions emerged.

Rethinking the Scientific Revolution book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Rethinking the Scientific Revolution. Osler traces two different epistemological traditions which converged on the mechanical philosophy and which produced two contradictory attitudes toward scientific knowledge. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-66790-6. Osler, Margaret J (1994). Divine Will and the Mechanical Philosophy: Gassendi and Descartes on Contingency and Necessity in the Created World. One of the traditions is the probabilism rooted in the skeptical crisis connected to post-Reformation theological debates. The article is mainly post-1720 in its thrust, but much of it is devoted to the seventeenth-century "roots.

This book challenges the traditional historiography of the Scientific Revolution

This book challenges the traditional historiography of the Scientific Revolution. Starting with a dialogue between Betty Jo Teeter Dobbs and Richard S. Westfall, whose understanding of the Scientific Revolution differs in important ways, the papers in this volume reconsider canonical figures, their areas of study, and the formation of disciplinary boundaries during this seminal period of European intellectual history.

The Scientific Revolution (roughly 1500 to 1700) is considered to be the central episode in the history of science, the historical moment when modern science .

The Scientific Revolution (roughly 1500 to 1700) is considered to be the central episode in the history of science, the historical moment when modern science an. .

What did the Scientific Revolution lead to? The sudden emergence of new information during the Scientific Revolution called into question religious beliefs, moral principles, and the traditional scheme of nature. It also strained old institutions and practices, necessitating new ways of communicating and disseminating information

Rethinking the Scientific Revolution This book challenges the traditional historiography of the Scientific Revolution, .

Rethinking the Scientific Revolution This book challenges the traditional historiography of the Scientific Revolution, .CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS Cambridge, New York, Melbourne, Madrid, Cape Town, Singapore, Sao Paulo Cambridge University Press The Edinburgh Building, Cambridge CB2 8RU, UK Published in the United States of America by Cambridge University Press, New York www.

The Scientific Revolution (roughly 1500 to 1700) is considered to be the central episode in the history of science, the historical moment when "modern science" and its attendant institutions emerged. This book challenges the traditional historiography of the Scientific Revolution. Starting with a dialogue between Betty Jo Teeter Dobbs and Richard S. Westfall, whose understanding of the Scientific Revolution differs in important ways, the papers in this volume reconsider canonical figures, their areas of study, and the formation of disciplinary boundaries during this seminal period of European intellectual history.