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Download HCCI and CAI Engines for the Automotive Industry fb2

by Hua Zhao
Download HCCI and CAI Engines for the Automotive Industry fb2
Engineering
  • Author:
    Hua Zhao
  • ISBN:
    1420044591
  • ISBN13:
    978-1420044591
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    CRC Press; 1 edition (September 10, 2007)
  • Pages:
    524 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Engineering
  • Language:
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    1162 kb
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    1683 kb
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    1105 kb
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    4.4
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    789
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Introduction Current automotive engines and technologies Historical background of HCCI/CAI type combustion .

Introduction Current automotive engines and technologies Historical background of HCCI/CAI type combustion engines Principle of HCCI/CAI combustion engines Definition of HCCI and CAI combustion engines Summary References. Chapter 4. Professor H. Zhao School of Engineering and Design Brunel University West London Uxbridge Middlesex, UB8 3PH UK. J. Yang 582 Terrace Court Canton, MI 48188 USA. E-mail:.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. HCCI and CAI engines for the automotive industry. Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) and Controlled Auto Ignition (CAI) Engines for the Automotive Industry. Категория: Математика, Прикладная математика. 3 Mb. Plunkett's Automobile Industry Almanac 2009: the Only Comprehensive Guide to Automotive Companies and Trends.

Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI)/controlled auto-ignition (CAI) has emerged as one of the most promising engine technologies with the potential to combine fuel efficiency and improved.

Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI)/controlled auto-ignition (CAI) has emerged as one of the most promising engine technologies with the potential to combine fuel efficiency and improved emissions performance, offering reduced nitrous oxides and particulate matter alongside efficiency comparable with modern diesel engines. Commercial applications are, however, close to reality.

Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) is a form of internal combustion in which well-mixed fuel and oxidizer (typically air) are compressed to the point of auto-ignition. As in other forms of combustion, this exothermic reaction releases energy that can be transformed in an engine into work and heat. HCCI combines characteristics of conventional gasoline engine and diesel engines. Gasoline engines combine homogeneous charge (HC) with spark ignition (SI), abbreviated as HCSI.

Hcci and Cai Engines for the Automotive Industry. Part 1 Overview: Motivation, definition, and history of HCCI/CAI engines. Part 2 Gasoline HCCI/CAI combustion engines: Overview of CAI/HCCI gasoline engines Two-stroke CAI engines Four-strok. More).

It tries to find out whether these technologies are suitable for the purpose to reduce pollutant emissions.

Automobile engineering has come a long way since the invention of the internal combustion engine. The internal combustion engine is, by any standards, the de facto reason for the existence of the automobile, today. These 20 examples are just some of the huge range of innovations made over the years. Although various examples of early engines have been around since the 1700's, it took Etienne Lenior to produce the first reliable one in 1859. The modern internal combustion engine, as we know it, wouldn't be developed until Nikolaus Otto patented his atmospheric gas engine in 1864.

Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine is a potential solution for reducing air pollution and for satisfying legal limits regarding the emissions from internal combustion engines. The HCCI engines have advantages of lower emissions of NOx and particulate matter, compared to the standard combustion modes, while on the other hand one of the major disadvantages is the difficulty of control of start of combustion, since the start of combustion is highly sensitive to the intake air temperature.

Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI)/controlled .

HCCI/CAI has emerged as one of the most promising engine technologies with the potential to combine fuel efficiency and improved emissions performance. Despite the considerable advantages, its operational range is rather limited and controlling the combustion (timing of ignition and rate of energy release) is still an area of on-going research. However, commercial applications are close to reality. This book reviews the key international research on optimising its use, including gasoline HCCI/CAI engines; diesel HCCI engines; HCCI/CAI engines with alternative fuels; and advanced modelling and experimental techniques.