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by Anthony Sutcliffe
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Engineering
  • Author:
    Anthony Sutcliffe
  • ISBN:
    0300110065
  • ISBN13:
    978-0300110067
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Yale University Press; First Edition edition (June 9, 2006)
  • Pages:
    264 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Engineering
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1660 kb
  • ePUB format
    1158 kb
  • DJVU format
    1254 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    264
  • Formats:
    doc lrf docx mobi


Anthony Sutcliffe was Emeritus Professor in History at the University of Leicester. Sadly, one may be tempted to apply some of these qualifiers to the recent photographs included in the book, all taken by the author himself.

Anthony Sutcliffe was Emeritus Professor in History at the University of Leicester. They are not of professional quality and often seem carelessly shot, with extreme contrasts and obtrusive passers-by, vehicles or parts thereof. Rather strangely, one (ugly) photo on page 202 is repeated on page 223! Overall, this book is of moderate interest and will appeal mainly to those with a strong passion towards London. 5 people found this helpful.

London : an architectural history. by. Sutcliffe, Anthony, 1942-2011. Architecture - England - London, London (England) - Buildings, structures, etc. Publisher. New Haven : Yale University Press. Preface - London and the idea of a city architecture - The remote city, 43-1603 - London's Augustan age, 1603-1830 - The London of the styles, 1830-1914 - The modern breaks through, 1914-1939 - London in the age of modern architecture, 1939-2000 - Conclusion: has there ever been an architecture.

In London: An Architectural History Anthony Sutcliffe takes the reader through two thousand years of architecture from the sublime to the mundane. With over 300 color illustrations the book is intended for the general reader and especially those visiting London for the first time.

by Anthony Sutcliffe. London is one of the world's greatest cities, and its architecture is a unique heritage. The Tower of London is an urban castle unique in Europe, St Paul's is one of the world's greatest domed cathedrals, and the squares and crescents of the West End inspired Haussmann's Paris. In London, it is the variety of the streets, buildings, and parks that strikes the visitor. No king or government has ever set its mark here.

London is one of the world’s greatest cities, and its architecture is a unique heritage. The Tower of London is an urban castle unique in Europe, St Paul’s is one of the world’s greatest domed cathedrals, and the squares and crescents of the West End inspired Haussmann’s Paris. Private ownership has shaped the city, and architects have served a wide variety of clients.

item 1 London: An Architectural History, Sutcliffe, Anthony, Good Condition Book, ISBN -London: An Architectural History, Sutcliffe, Anthony, Good Condition Book, ISBN. Presents a comprehensive overview of London's buildings, which encompasses the history of the city's architecture, from the time of the Romans to the twenty-first century. This book examines every kind of building, from palaces to terraced houses, shops to railway stations, and bridges to churches.

Anthony Sutcliffe (2006), London: An Architectural History, Yale University Press, p. 149, ISBN 9780300110067. Download as PDF. Printable version. Ed Glinert (2012), "Aldford House", The London Compendium, Penguin, p. 359, ISBN 9780718192044. Coordinates: 51°30′30″N 0°09′13″W, 5. 084°N . 537°W, 5. 084; -. 537. This article about a specific building or structure is a stub.

Anthony Sutcliffe (2006) London: An Architectural History, Yale University Press, please read Chapter 2. The Remote City, 43-1603. 1995) Architecture and the Sites of History, Watson- Guptill Publications, please read Francis Woodman, Chapter 5. The Rib, the arch and the buttress: the structure of gothic architecture.

Anthony Sutcliffe (1942-2011) helped Gordon Cherry set up the Planning History group in the 1970s and was a joint founder .

Anthony Sutcliffe (1942-2011) helped Gordon Cherry set up the Planning History group in the 1970s and was a joint founder with him of IPHS, organising the first conference in 1977. Annotated Bibliography (1981), Paris: An Architectural History (1993), An Economic and Social History of Western Europe Since 1945 (1996), London: An Architectural History (2006).

Sutcliffe later turned increasingly to the history of architecture, with two major books published by Yale University Press: Paris: An Architectural History (1993) and London: An Architectural History (2006). Lavishly illustrated with brilliantly relevant photographs – many of them his own – they steer a confident course through the shoals of architectural taste and style, some international but many individual and idiosyncratic to each city.

London is one of the world’s greatest cities, and its architecture is a unique heritage.  The Tower of London is an urban castle unique in Europe, St Paul’s is one of the world’s greatest domed cathedrals, and the squares and crescents of the West End inspired Haussmann’s Paris.In London, it is the variety of the streets, buildings, and parks that strikes the visitor. No king or government has ever set its mark here. Private ownership has shaped the city, and architects have served a wide variety of clients. London’s Classical era produced an elegant townscape between 1600 and 1830, but medieval, Tudor, and Victorian London were a potpourri of buildings large and small, each making its own design statement.In London: An Architectural History Anthony Sutcliffe takes the reader through two thousand years of architecture from the sublime to the mundane. With over 300 color illustrations the book is intended for the general reader and especially those visiting London for the first time.

Clodebd
I acquired this book after reading the excellent work written in 1994 by the same author on the architecture of Paris.

This book on the British capital is unfortunately not comparable.

Though thorough and well researched, it is generally very critical of London's architecture.

Clearly, the author prefers Paris to his own home city.

Refreshingly, he sometimes speaks tongue-in-cheek, for instance drawing a parallel between a cattle market and an adjacent prison.

However, he is often excessively vocal in expressing his opinions. For example, while the Victorian City of London is described as a «wasteland», the following adjectives are used to describe specific buildings of that era: grotesque, ugly, atrocious, dull, nondescript, dour, tasteless, pretentious and styleless.

Sadly, one may be tempted to apply some of these qualifiers to the recent photographs included in the book, all taken by the author himself. They are not of professional quality and often seem carelessly shot, with extreme contrasts and obtrusive passers-by, vehicles or parts thereof. Rather strangely, one (ugly) photo on page 202 is repeated on page 223!

Overall, this book is of moderate interest and will appeal mainly to those with a strong passion towards London.
Obong
I'm a long-time fan of pictorial books on the history of structures of a particular place -- not because I have any training in architecture, but because I'm very big on local history and buildings constitute the most prominent "physical anthropology" of any place. In the case of this particular volume, I'm also fascinated by London and its history, from the Roman town and William's White Tower to the reclamation of the Docklands. Lots of relatively new discoveries are depicted here, including the newly identified Roman victory arch, and many lesser known buildings are discussed, including the Staple Inn, the Panopticon prison plan, and the old Caledonian Market Clock Tower. And if you're a student of Wren's post-Fire churches, or of Buckingham Palace, there's lots here to interest you, too. An engrossing book.