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by Robert Morris
Download Environmental Case for Nuclear Power: Economic, Medical, and Political Considerations fb2
Engineering
  • Author:
    Robert Morris
  • ISBN:
    1557787808
  • ISBN13:
    978-1557787804
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Paragon House; 1 edition (July 1, 2000)
  • Pages:
    208 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Engineering
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1910 kb
  • ePUB format
    1111 kb
  • DJVU format
    1599 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    490
  • Formats:
    azw txt mbr lrf


Robert C. Morris received his P. In this book Robert Morris does a generally credible job explaining the benefits of nuclear power.

Robert C. in Science Education and is a retired Chemistry teacher, Educational Consultant and former Chairman of the Science Department for Illinois High School District 88. Morris is a recipient of the American Chemical Society Award for outstanding work in chemical education, received honorable mention in the National Science Teachers Association’s program to select the . science teacher of the year, and was a four-time recipient of National Science Foundation grants.

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book by Robert C. Morris. In the 20th Century, air pollution produced by the fossil fuels killed over five million Americans. Morris, a retired chemistry teacher, argues against opponents of nuclear power, saying they overestimate its danger. He compares fossil fuels and nuclear power, asserting that nuclear power offers a vast potential improvement over toxic pollution by fossil fuel use, while arguing that other alternat.

The Seabrook Nuclear Power Plant, more commonly known as Seabrook Station, is a nuclear . a b Morris, Robert C. (2000). The environmental case for nuclear power : economic, medical, and political considerations.

The Seabrook Nuclear Power Plant, more commonly known as Seabrook Station, is a nuclear power plant located in Seabrook, New Hampshire, United States, approximately 40 miles (64 km) north of Boston and 10 miles (16 km) south of Portsmouth. Two units (reactors) were planned, but the second unit was never completed due to construction delays, cost overruns and troubles obtaining financing. The construction permit for the plant was granted in 1976, and construction on Unit 1 was completed in 1986.

2003) Morris, Robert . The Environmental Case for Nuclear Power: Economic, Medical, and Political Considerations, Continuum (2000) Ford, Davis . Toxicity Reduction, Technomics (1992) Jensen, Paul, Davis L. Ford, et al, How Knowledge Gained in Toxicity Testing Can Help. Ford, et al, How Knowledge Gained in Toxicity Testing Can Help Water Conservation, PBS&J (unpublished) Eckenfelder, W. W. and Davis L. Ford, Water Pollution Control, Jenkins Press (1970) Ataei, . Wastewater Treatment: Energy-Conservation.

The Environmental Case for Nuclear Power Economic, Medical, and Political Consideration Robert C. This 2000 book by a retired chemistry teacher is an easy-to-read book comparing the hazards of nuclear power to the hazards of air pollution. The book is a bit preachy, and there is not enough back up for many of the statements (that I do believe are correct).

Fuel, operational, and maintenance costs are relatively small components of the total cost. The long service life and high capacity factor of nuclear power plants allow sufficient funds for ultimate plant decommissioning and waste storage and management to be accumulated, with little impact on the price per unit of electricity generated

The Seabrook Nuclear Power Plant, more commonly known as Seabrook Station, is a nuclear .

Morris, a retired chemistry teacher, argues against opponents of nuclear power, saying they overestimate its danger. He compares fossil fuels and nuclear power, asserting that nuclear power offers a vast potential improvement over toxic pollution by fossil fuel use, while arguing that other alternat

Kizshura
In this book Robert Morris does a generally credible job explaining the benefits of nuclear power. His book is factually accurate and informative, and particularly useful to people who have listened to extensive anti-nuclear rhetoric without attempting to hear the pro-nuclear arguments.

While I agree with most of the points Morris makes, I do have a couple of quibbles with the book. The first is endless, mind-numbing repetition. I don't know how many times he says that 50,000 people a year die in the US from carbon-based air pollution, but you can bet it's a lot. The basic point here is that while that is likely true, repeating it every other page for 200 pages or so does not help make the case: this book needs editing. The second issue I have with the book is the presence of grossly inflated, yet trivial arguments. There is no question, for instance, that coal and oil use are air polluters; that is a valid point to make in this book. Where the logic gets stretched, however, is when he claims that because of all this air pollution (that would not be present with more nuclear power) that humans probably have more fatal traffic accidents because carbon monoxide makes driver reaction times longer, seems improvable at best, and ludicrous at worst. These are the two big criticisms I have of the book.

While I believe his data on nuclear safety statistics, I do think that he overestimates nuclear safety features, and perhaps underestimates dangers. Safety engineering professionals study not only the accidents in an industry, but also the incidents that did not lead to accidents, yet could have. On this matter Morris is totally silent, and I think that detracts significantly from the scientific validity of some of his arguments: in other words, accidents are actually very rare, incidents more common. Since Three Mile Island the nuclear industry has become much better about sharing trend data, but this book leads readers to the conclusion that nuclear power is a 100 percent safe, utopian energy source. I personally agree that it is a generally safe source of power, and that the US would be wise to follow Europe's lead (for once) and develop more of it. Having said that, I also believe that nuclear accidents could potentially be quite dangerous, despite Morris' reassurances.

Most of the low rating reviewers here are clearly in the anti-nuclear camp, and I think it's admirable that they read the book (if they actually did). I do question where most of them got their information; some of the armchair critics seem unclear on basic physics or other issues (like Uranium ore production, for instance.) One particularly offensive reviewer thought that this book proves that Morris was worse than Hitler and hated babies. My take on that: if you can't objectively criticize the book, you must not have anything important to say...frequently like the media establishment. It is clear that Morris' assertion that the media spreads a virulently anti-nuclear message is correct, probably in part because they are politically to the left in general, but more likely simply because it sells. For the same reason that you never see a headline reading "Jetliner Lands On Time After a Smooth Flight: Passengers Enjoyed A Light Snack" you will also never see a headline reading "Nuclear Plant Releases No Radiation; Nobody Injured; Electricity Produced At A Reasonable Price." This is a differentiation that I think needs to me made, and while he attempts to make that argument in the book it falls a bit flat.

While parts of this book are a bit overblown, and the book is clearly in the pro-nuclear camp, at least Morris makes his sympathies clear at the outset. I am glad that he wrote the book, and despite a few qualms about the presentation, I think it is worthy reading for anyone on either side of the nuclear debate, preferably in conjunction with the excellent and considerably more unbiased masterwork on contemporary nuclear safety organizations, "Hostages of Each Other" by Joseph Rees.
Auridora
The premise of this book is that we will continue to exploit some form of energy since the alternative is a world that cannot support agriculture, civilization or current population. The United States has choices but activists, in collaboration with the news media, have distorted the negatives of nuclear power and ignored the consequences of the alternative: burning coal. The costs of building nuclear power plants have been inflated due to relentless law suits. Morris looks at the true costs of fossil fuel, and the true promise of nuclear power. Much of the world now relies for the majority of their electricity on nuclear plants, which have increasingly improved safety designs. So it's really an American problem, and we have missed out on the rational growth of clean nuclear power for three decades. The tone is a rational weighing of our options, and it is left to the reader to ask why we allowed ourselves to be distracted from the safer, cleaner, sustainable choice. Charts of fossil fuel accidents illustrate the raw deal nuclear has received. If you care about the future, read this book and then voice your support. Our decisions, unfortunately, involve political, not technical, considerations. The home of the brave needs the wisdom and courage to stand up for rational energy choices.
Akirg
If you are only going to read one book about nuclear energy, fossil fuels and alternative energy sources, this is the one. If you are going to read more than one, this is the one to start with. It is easy to read, packed with solid scientifically based information, and easy to understand with little or no scientific background. It smashes many of the myths promoted by alarmist "environmentalists" who usually speak in generalities and have little or no scientific background. Dr. Morris tells you what the science says, and what the scientists believe in concise lucid detail.
The book fills the critical need for a logical explanation of the advantages and disadvantages of various methods of meeting our energy needs: fossil fuels (oil, natural gas, coal), nuclear, hydroelectric, solar, windmills, oil shales, hydrogen. It also explains the alarming consequences of failing to meet these needs. It discusses the advantages, environmental effects, economics and practicality of all these sources of energy. It sounds like a huge undertaking, but Dr. Morris explains it easily and soundly.
If you want real scientific information for the layman about nuclear and other forms of energy, this is the book to read.
Drelalak
This book provides a very good introduction to nuclear energy and the environmental factors. The author covers in some detail the issues of using nuclear power and the fallacies of the environmental extremists who oppose it. To environmentalist mindlessness the author provides good brain food.
In particular Mr. Morris points out the down side of trying to manage without energy in a less affluent society. Anti-nuke artists might note that in the energy scarce Middle Ages acting and artist jobs were few and far between. The average peasant only saw a juggler once in a while.
Vudomuro
This is a book that the New Zealand government should read and backs up a book that I read years ago called the "The Day the Bomb Fell". I would like to add my two cents worth in relation to the five worst coal mining disasters on P 132. The Number 2 colliery at the Wankie Coal Mine in what was then Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) suffered a coal dust explosion in 1972 which killed 427 miners. This is a prophetic book and the powers that be need to take note, particularly here in New Zealand which has suffered electricty shortages because hydro dams have dried up recently as a result of 1 in 50 year droughts that seem to happen every year now. It's time to wake up and smell the coffee.
Urtte
This was a great read for someone just getting interested in energy for the future.