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by W.Somerset Maugham
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Schools & Teaching
  • Author:
    W.Somerset Maugham
  • ISBN:
    0435295721
  • ISBN13:
    978-0435295721
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Macmillan Education Ltd; New Ed edition (October 1970)
  • Pages:
    240 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Schools & Teaching
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1453 kb
  • ePUB format
    1897 kb
  • DJVU format
    1833 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    182
  • Formats:
    mbr lrf lrf mobi


The Moon and Sixpence is a novel by W. Somerset Maugham, told in episodic form by the first-person narrator as a series of glimpses into the mind and soul of the central character, Charles Strickland, a middle-aged English.

The Moon and Sixpence is a novel by W. Somerset Maugham, told in episodic form by the first-person narrator as a series of glimpses into the mind and soul of the central character, Charles Strickland, a middle-aged English stockbroker who abandons his wife and children abruptly to pursue his desire to become an artist. Stylistic analyses of English text. The Moon and Sixpence by W. Somerset Maugham. Автор: Черноклинова Ольга Андреевна Класс: 10 А школа: МОУ Средняя общеобразовательная школа №2 г. Кременки Жуковский район Калужская область.

Home W. Somerset Maugham The Moon and Sixpence. Some were modern and some were old-fashioned. To me it was all very romantic. Somerset Maugham first published in April 15th, 1919. It is told in episodic form by a first-person narrator, in a series of glimpses into the mind and soul of the central character Charles Strickland, a middle-aged English stockbroker, who abandons his wife and children abruptly to pursue his desire to become an artist. The story is in part based on the life of the painter Paul Gauguin.

Maugham, Gauguin, fictional texts, Count Kessler, Conrad, The Moon and .

Maugham, Gauguin, fictional texts, Count Kessler, Conrad, The Moon and Sixpence. The Moon and Sixpence (1919) draws on the life of Paul Gauguin in complex ways, some of. them surprising. English intellectual life following the furore roused by the ineffectual Royal Commission into. university education of 1850, and equally familiar in English letters as a result of Coleridge’s. and Carlyle’s ‘Germanising’ earlier in the century, especially the latter’s Sartor Resartus. While he was writing The Moon and Sixpence, the only extant monograph on Gauguin was. Paul Gauguin 1848-1903 by Jean de Rotonchamp (pseudonym of Louis Brouillard), the.

The moon and sixpence. William Somerset Maugham was born in 1874 and lived in Paris until he was ten. He was educated at King's School, Canterbury, and at Heidelberg University.

This item:The Moon and Sixpence by W. Somerset Maugham Paperback .

The Moon and Sixpence was written as a sort of biographical fiction on the life of the painter Paul Gauguin. Gauguin was called Strickland in the book, and was cast as a disillusioned former stockbroker and family man. The narrator becomes obsessed with following his life and movements, due to Strickland's extraordinarily misanthropic and apathetic view of western society.

Maugham, W. Somerset (William Somerset), 1874-1965.

W. Somerset Maugham's Introduction to modern English and American literature. by. Maugham, W.

The Moon and Sixpence book. My imagination was tickled beyond measure and when I discovered there was a novel by . omerset Maugham (the author of The Razor's Edge no less!) based on Gauguin, my joy knew no bounds. I was in the correct frame of mind to read about the life of a stockbroker who gave up on the trivial pleasures of bourgeois life for the penury and hard life of an aspiring painter without considering him ridiculous or vain.

The Moon and Sixpence: All artists should read this book. It is a fictionalization of the life of post-impressionist artist Paul Gaugin. The main character is sent on a mission to find the remiss husband of a friend

The Moon and Sixpence: All artists should read this book. The main character is sent on a mission to find the remiss husband of a friend. Once he finds this man, Charles Strickland, he is unable to make him come back to his wife in England. Charles has left his life of relative ease to become an artist - and not a very good one, according to some


xander
Perhaps this novel should have a warning label underneath the title "Warning: may cause you to re-evaluate your life" because that was my experience of this masterpiece.
The plot is loosely based on the life of Gaugin, a famous painter but even if you are fairly ignorant of his work you can still be deeply moved by this novel.
Charles Strickland is a middle aged man with a sound profession and a respectable family. He throws all this away to become an artist. First he goes to Paris where he lives in poverty and squalor and destroys at least two other people who just happen to cross his path then after further misadventures he lands in Tahiti and there he paints his masterpieces.
What really made this book for me was the sense that even though Strickland had thrown his life away and lived in appalling poverty and degradation his life was more meaningful and even beautiful as a result than if he had stayed a respectable middle class man. The idea of a life spent pursuing beauty at whatever cost is intoxicating and I've never come across a writer who can convey what this means better than W. Somerset Maugham.
Highly recommended.
Wrathshaper
A dreadful misogynist who left his wife and 3 kids without remorse or a smidgen of regret in his mid-40s to pursue the painter's life in Paris, stole the wife of another painter who committed suicide when he rejected her as no longer necessary. Ultimately, he moves to Tahiti to live, paint masterpieces, marry a young native girl and die a leper.

Maugham's interesting study based on the life of the painter Paul Gauguin is partly a mockery of society's willingness to turn sinners into saints and partly a sober look at the artist's lifelong pursuit of "beauty" and its costs to both himself/herself and to loved ones.

I'd recommend it if you like Somerset Maugham, which I do, even though he was somewhat of an old lady in temperament. Warning too: it's fairly sexist -- one example, "Women are strange little beasts,... You can treat them like dogs, you can beat them till your arm aches, and still they love you." He shrugged his shoulders. "Of course, it is one of the most absurd illusions of Christianity that they have souls.... In the end they get you, and you are helpless in their hands. White or brown, they are all the same."
Fordrelis
Mr. Maugham was, perhaps, the greatest short-story writer, ever. If not, he was surely one of them and near the top. The book was captivating and very readable. My one criticism is the omission of Paul Gauguin's friendship with Vincent Van Gogh, a central issue in his life. However, who am I to criticize this fine writer.
Rrinel
The Moon and Sixpence was written as a sort of biographical fiction on the life of the painter Paul Gauguin. Gauguin was called Strickland in the book, and was cast as a disillusioned former stockbroker and family man. The narrator becomes obsessed with following his life and movements, due to Strickland's extraordinarily misanthropic and apathetic view of western society. The narrator struggled to grasp Strickland's motivations. It seemed his best explanation was that Strickland was possessed by a drive to find a sort of terrible primeval beauty in man and the world around him. Yet Strickland's genus as a painter was eventually recognized, contrasting greatly with the man himself. The narrator used Strickland as a sort of muse, to reflect upon the human condition. This was a book that started slow, but was hard to put down. Definitely worth the read.
Jorius
I have put this, not new, but still beautiful book, on the reading list for a class I am teaching, Into The Heart of Art. This book stirred a lot of controversy when it was first published, because it's a brazen and obvious portrayal of the life of the well known artist, Gauguin, borrowing so unmistakeably from his life and yet, not at all Gauguin, because the artist portrayed has a very same but different life. The beautiful old copy of this book, which I got from Amazon, has lovely prints of Gauguin's paintings within, and if you can get it, I heartily recommend this particular edition! Somerset Maugham is a wonderful writer. The book itself makes us all ponder the nature of the creative spirit that pushes a person to the extremes of giving up so much that is "comfortable" to pursue his or her art. The Gauguin portrayed in this book is not a sympathetic character, and yet, he is pursued by his Muse. There are beautiful, memorable quotes about art in this book. Purchase it. Find them. Enjoy!
Brakree
I am a big fan of Maugham's and this book was a masterpiece, as was his Of Human Bondage. I think Maugham puts a lot of himself and his troubled life into his books. I am not a fan of Gauguin's paintings, but it at least gave some insight into what made Gauguin so world-renowned. This book is really incredible (and I have read it five times at least).