» » Media Literacy Grade 7-8

Download Media Literacy Grade 7-8 fb2

by Melissa Hart
Download Media Literacy Grade 7-8 fb2
Schools & Teaching
  • Author:
    Melissa Hart
  • ISBN:
    1420627805
  • ISBN13:
    978-1420627800
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Teacher Created Resources (September 1, 2008)
  • Pages:
    144 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Schools & Teaching
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1259 kb
  • ePUB format
    1847 kb
  • DJVU format
    1877 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    985
  • Formats:
    lit rtf docx doc


Books New Releases Best Sellers Arabic Books Children's Books Business & Finance Self-Help Literature & Fiction Cookbooks Biographies & Memoirs. Media Literacy Grade 7-8. by Melissa Hart 1 October 2008.

Books New Releases Best Sellers Arabic Books Children's Books Business & Finance Self-Help Literature & Fiction Cookbooks Biographies & Memoirs. 1-16 of 40 results for Books : Melissa Hart.

Media Literacy Grade 5 book. See a Problem? We’d love your help.

Hart, Melissa F. Book One: Taming Suzanna Book Two: Capturing Suzanna Book Three: Freeing Suzanna Book Four . Hart, Melissa F. Schoolyard Bully - Volume 1 Love and Chinese Food - Volume 2 Twisted Sisters - Volume 3. Read online. Book One: Taming Suzanna Book Two: Capturing Suzanna Book Three: Freeing Suzanna Book Four: Suzanna Bound by Love. Phases of Passions II (Trilogy Bundle) (Werewolf Romance - Paranormal Romance).

Melissa Hart 10 Books To Help Build Self-Confidence in Your Tweens and . Better with Books author Melissa Hart will provide examples from middle school literature, but this event will be valuable for parents o. .

Melissa Hart 10 Books To Help Build Self-Confidence in Your Tweens and Teens Teaching them to love themselves is necessary for growth. By Melissa Hart posted May 16th, 2019 These 10 books will help your child gain self-confidence. Melissa Hart, Author. Better with Books author Melissa Hart will provide examples from middle school literature, but this event will be valuable for parents of children of any age! (And middle school students are welcome!) FRI, MAY 17.

Melissa Hart, Teacher Created Resources Staff. PreK by The Mailbox Books Staff (2008, Book, Other). Б/у: 766,22 RUB. Hooray for Me! : PreK-K by The Mailbox Books Staff (2009, Book, Other).

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Melissa Hart books online. Media Literacy Grade 5. Melissa Hart. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles.

As they develop media literacy, they learn to make thoughtful, informed decisions.

is an umbrella term encompassing a variety of approaches that. Media Literacy is critical to the health and well-being of America’s children, as well as to their future participation in the civic and economic life of our democracy. What is the MLN definition of Media Literacy?

Help students learn to think critically about the thousands of media messages they encounter each day via art, music, video games, radio, TV, websites, newspapers, magazines, ads, and packaging. Standards-based lessons require students to deconstruct, examine, discuss, and create media messages. As they develop media literacy, they learn to make thoughtful, informed decisions.

Whilingudw
Major props to Melissa Hart for creating a media literacy workbook for students, and even including a certificate of completion. Every page is a removable worksheet. There’s nothing else like it on the market. It includes some innovative, developmentally appropriate analysis strategies, like filling in imagined dialogue or doing a blind taste test to compare generic and advertised brands. And students who complete all the activities will certainly come away with a greater awareness of the media messages that surround us.
So, why the low rating? Because the workbook’s underlying approach won’t help students become proficient critical thinkers, which is, after all, the major purpose of media literacy.

There are three (interrelated) big misses:
1. The underlying goal of most activities is for students to find the “true” message. That contradicts a basic tenet of media analysis, which is that everyone interprets through the lens of their own experiences; two people can look at the same thing and have differing takeaways without either being wrong.
2. Too many activities ask students to come to conclusions without ever asking them to provide the evidence for those conclusions. So, for example, An analysis of a photo of a Japanese internment camp asks “What do you think is happening here?” but never asks students for evidence to support their answers.
3. The approach uses a banking model of education that tells students what to think about media rather than a constructivist approach that allows students to learn how to think for themselves.

Those major issues are exacerbated by dozens of smaller problems, such as:
1. Students are encouraged to think in oversimplified binary terms. For example, students are repeatedly asked to classify media examples into “healthy” or “unhealthy.” What’s a student supposed to do with a media document that is neither healthy nor unhealthy (e.g., the sign for a local laundromat), or healthy in some ways and unhealthy in others (e.g., promotes outdoor activities and exercise but also sells water in plastic bottles) or healthy for some people but unhealthy for others (e.g., something that would be okay for a middle schooler but not okay for their three-year-old sibling)?
2. Messages are either “obvious” or “hidden.” There are two issues here. First, the word “hidden” is misleading. It’s the equivalent of implying that a book’s messages are hidden if a reader doesn’t have the requisite knowledge to understand all the words. The words are all there; there’s nothing “hidden” about them. It's the reader's literacy skills that determine what they see.
More importantly, the author’s explanation of what constitutes a “hidden” message is flat out wrong (p23). Using the example of a soda ad, the author suggests that the hidden message is that if you buy the soda you will be like the people in the picture. Actually, that is part of the overt “buy this soda” message. The implicit message that a twelve-year-old might miss is that the women in the ad define a standard of beauty, and anyone who doesn’t look like them isn’t beautiful.
3. Historical documents are introduced for analysis but readers are given only cursory background on the history of the era. This means that students are asked to draw conclusions without being informed enough to provide well-reasoned answers. So, for example, one activity describes the panic caused by the radio broadcast of War of the Worlds, but there is nothing on what was happening in the U.S. at the time, either politically or technologically, that would have explained people’s heightened fears of attack. Students are encouraged to research topics online, but there are no activities on research skills or assessing the credibility of sources.
4. Students are often advised to find their own media example to analyze. While it’s a good idea to do media analysis using texts that are already a part of students’ lives, the open-ended approach here is a problem. For example, one activity asks students to watch their favorite film and look for product placements. But what if their favorite film is something like Sound of Music or Wizard of Oz, which have no product placements?
5. There are activities dealing with stereotyping, but nothing on the role of repetition in media (which is necessary for stereotyping to have an impact). One of the radio exercises actually suggests to students that use of a British accent might indicate that the speaker is a “beautiful person” but it never asks students to explore why a British accent might be desirable or appealing. Why not a Southern accent? or Jamaican? or Mandarin?
6. Several sections ask students to compare historical and contemporary practices, but without ever explaining why that might be a valuable thing to do. What’s a student supposed to learn from comparing a 1950s TV commercial with a TV ad today? Time might have been better spent asking students to explore the ethics over services that are free to users but that include ads, versus services that users pay for but are ad free. Instead of just telling students about the FCC ruling to allow ads on TV, students could have explored the the pros and cons of each option in the 1950s and today.
7. There is a primary focus on analyzing advertising, but in the discussion of music videos, the text says they are made to “illustrate a song,” without so much as a mention of their role in selling songs, albums, and concert tickets.
8. The word “media” is used as a singular instead of plural noun (as in “How Media Affects You” instead of “How Media Affect You”). Not only is this grammatically incorrect, but it leaves students with the erroneous impression that media are monolithic.
9. The author acknowledges that books are media, but there isn’t a single activity that involves analyzing a book.

The things that this book wants students to think about are important, but it just doesn’t do an adequate job of designing activities that would encourage the type of complex reasoning or reflection that the author is after. Because the level of thinking it requires tends towards the simplistic, I fear that many students would be bored by this workbook. That’s a shame, because high quality media literacy education engages and excites even resistant students.

Teachers should also know that this was published in 2008, which means there is nothing here on social media, so nothing on creating a digital footprint, cyberbullying, sexting or privacy. And though there are actual historical media examples, all the contemporary references are line drawings rather than real media. I assume this had to do with copyright issues, but given that this is about analysis, there are workarounds, and the lack of real-life examples to analyze really detracts from the value. If ever there were a text that would have benefited from a companion website with downloadable media examples, this is it.
Xal
I got a new class thrown at me this year, this has been a useful resource
Coiriel
What a find! Discovered late in the game but I'm glad its now here. The work is relevant and well constructed.