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by Barbara Reys
Download The Intended Mathematics Curriculum as Represented in State-Level Curriculum Standards: Consensus or Confusion? (PB) (Research in Mathematics Education) fb2
Schools & Teaching
  • Author:
    Barbara Reys
  • ISBN:
    1930608527
  • ISBN13:
    978-1930608528
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    IAP - Information Age Publishing (October 1, 2006)
  • Pages:
    152 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Schools & Teaching
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    1935 kb
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The intended mathematics curriculum Page 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY. The mathematics curriculum in the United States is difficult to characterize.

The intended mathematics curriculum Page 1. Since the passage of the federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB, 2001) state. Curriculum decisions in the United States are made at multiple levels of a complex system. These decisions are further complicated by a shifting terrain of curriculum resources, propelled forward by the Internet and globalization.

The current set of state-level mathematics standards documents .

The intended mathematics curriculum Page 1 This report describes the amount of variation regarding specified grades at which states call for particular learning goals/expectations. The intended mathematics curriculum Page 4 Table 5. Number of states and grade-level when state GLE documents introduce computation with fractions.

This volume represents a detailed analysis of the grade placement of mathematics learning goals across all state-level curriculum standards published as of May 2005. The volume documents the varied grade-level mathematics curriculum expectations in the . and highlights a general lack of consensus across states. As states continue to work to improve learning opportunities for all students this report can serve as a useful summary to inform future curriculum decisions

The Intended Mathematics Curriculum as Represented in StateLevel Curriculum Standards: Consensus or Confusion? - Е-книга напишана од Barbara Reys

The Intended Mathematics Curriculum as Represented in StateLevel Curriculum Standards: Consensus or Confusion? - Е-книга напишана од Barbara Reys. Прочитајте за книгава со апликацијата Google Play Books на вашиот компјутер или уред со Android или iOS. Преземете ја The Intended Mathematics Curriculum as Represented in StateLevel Curriculum Standards: Consensus or Confusion? за офлајн читање, означете ја, обележете ја или запишувајте белешки додека ја читате.

Barbara J. Reys Center for the Study of Mathematics Curriculum The intended curriculum: What mathematics should students . Reys Center for the Study of Mathematics Curriculum The intended curriculum: What mathematics should students learn and when should they learn it? Slideshow 23620 b. .Publication of State-Level Mathematics Curriculum Standards(as of May 2006) 2006 4 states 2005 9 states 2004 13 states 2003 8 states 2002 4 states 2001 4 states 2000 2 states pre-2000 7 states (FL, 1999). Increased Specificity, Authority, and Influence For many states, their most recent curriculum standards represent increased specificity of learning expectations compared to previous standards.

The newest iterations of state mathematics standards specify grade-level learning expectations. For many states, these documents are far more specific with regard to grade placement of topics than previous state standards or frameworks. For example, prior to NCLB, most state departments of education provided school districts with a broad set of standards (generally organized by grade band, such as K-4, 5-8, and 9-12). The states then monitored student learning at particular grades (.

The intended mathematics curriculum as represented in state-level curriculum standards: consensus or confusion? Charlotte: Information Age. Google Scholar.

The intended curriculum: What mathematics should students learn and when should they learn it? .

The intended curriculum: What mathematics should students learn and when should they learn it? No Child Left Behind (2001) Each state is required to: - adopt challenging academic content standards that will be used by the State, its local educational agencies, and its schools. Publication of State-Level Mathematics Curriculum Standards (as of May 2006) 2006 4 states 2005 9 states 2004 13 states 2003 8 states 2002 4 states 2001 4 states 2000 2 states pre-2000 7 states (FL, 1999).

4 Organization of High School Mathematics Curriculum Standards States generally organize high school mathematics curriculum standards . The Intended Mathematics Curriculum as Represented in State-Level Curriculum Standards: Consensus or Confusion?

4 Organization of High School Mathematics Curriculum Standards States generally organize high school mathematics curriculum standards in one of three ways by course, by grade, or by grade band. The Intended Mathematics Curriculum as Represented in State-Level Curriculum Standards: Consensus or Confusion? Greenwich, CT: Information Age Publishing, Inc. Curriculum for High School Mathematics Page 5.

Reys, B. J. (E. (2006). The Intended Mathematics Curriculum as Represented in State-Level Curriculum Standards: Consensus or Confusion? Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing. Proceedings of the tenth international congress on Mathematics Education, July 4-11, 2004. Roskilde, Denmark: IMFUFA.

This volume represents a detailed analysis of the grade placement of mathematics learning goals across all state-level curriculum standards published as of May 2005. The volume documents the varied grade-level mathematics curriculum expectations in the U.S. and highlights a general lack of consensus across states. As states continue to work to improve learning opportunities for all students this report can serve as a useful summary to inform future curriculum decisions. The report is also intended to stimulate discussion at the national level regarding roles and responsibilities of national agencies and professional organizations with regard to curriculum leadership. Serious and collaborative work that results from such discussions can contribute to a more coherent, focused mathematics curriculum for Us students