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by James Schall,Intercollegiate Studies Institute
Download A Student's Guide to Liberal Learning (Isi Guides to the Major Disciplines) fb2
Schools & Teaching
  • Author:
    James Schall,Intercollegiate Studies Institute
  • ISBN:
    1882926536
  • ISBN13:
    978-1882926534
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Intercollegiate Studies Inst; 58894th edition (April 1, 2000)
  • Pages:
    54 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Schools & Teaching
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1173 kb
  • ePUB format
    1463 kb
  • DJVU format
    1752 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    914
  • Formats:
    mobi lrf mbr doc


James Schall, professor in the Department of Government at Georgetown University, wrote this book as part of the ISI Guides to the Major Disciplines

James Schall, professor in the Department of Government at Georgetown University, wrote this book as part of the ISI Guides to the Major Disciplines. He encourages students to read great books saying that "the very existence of the great books enables us to escape from any tyranny of the present, from the idea that we only want to study what is currently & or immediately useful.

A Student’s Guide to Liberal Learning is an inviting conversation with a learned scholar about the content of an authentic liberal arts education. It surveys ideas and books central to the tradition of humanistic education that has fundamentally shaped our country and civilization. A Student's Guide to Liberal Learning. Understand history in one sitting.

Start by marking A Student's Guide to Liberal Learning (ISI Guides to the Major Disciplines) as Want to Read . It surveys ideas and books central to the tradition of humanistic education that has fundamentally shaped our country and our civilization

Start by marking A Student's Guide to Liberal Learning (ISI Guides to the Major Disciplines) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. It surveys ideas and books central to the tradition of humanistic education that has fundamentally shaped our country and our civilization.

The Intercollegiate Studies Institute logo is an open book in the colors of the American flag " books, for example A Student's Guide to Liberal Learning, providing a classical introduction into several disciplines. It also holds other events, such as conferences, that feature prominent conservative speakers and academics, and provides funding for students to attend these conferences. In this funding capacity ISI is affiliated with the Liberty Fund.

The ISI Guides to the Major Disciplines are reader-friendly introductions to the most important fields of knowledge in the liberal arts. Read this book by Dr. Schall then get the books he recommends for a true education

The ISI Guides to the Major Disciplines are reader-friendly introductions to the most important fields of knowledge in the liberal arts. Schall then get the books he recommends for a true education. After that read his book-Another Sort of Learning and then read the books he recommends in that book.

series ISI Guides to the Major Disciplines. It surveys ideas and books central to the tradition of humanistic education that has fundamentally shaped our country and our civilization

series ISI Guides to the Major Disciplines. Freshly conveying the excitement of learning from the acknowledged masters of intellectual life, this guide is also an excellent blueprint for building one’s own library of books that matter.

A Student's Guide to American Political Thought by George W. Carey

I thought it was a handbook for how to study economics for those who wanted a really good education in the field: what books to. .

ISI Guides to the Major Disciplines. A Student’s Guide to Philosophy by Ralph M. McInerny

ISI Guides to the Major Disciplines. McInerny. A Student’s Guide to Literature by R. V. Young. A Student’s Guide to Liberal Learning by James V. Schall, . A Student’s Guide to the Study of History by John Lukacs. The Student Self-Reliance Project and the ISI Guides to the Major Disci-plines are made possible by grants from the Philip M. McKenna Foundation, the Wilbur Foundation, F. M. Kirby Foundation, Castle Rock Foundation, the William H. Donner Foundation, and other contributors who wish to remain anonymous.

James Schall, Great Books, Liberal Learning, Morality, Reason. Clearly, the notion of discipline, especially disciplining one’s own self, has to do with the systematic process by which we acquire knowledge or virtue or art. Discipline means instruction, especially organized instruction. It is difficult to see ourselves as we are, even if this inner seeing is one of the most important things we must do for ourselve. n today’s world, when the topic of the defects of university teaching and curricula comes up, the most well-known alternative put forward is the great books programs.

The ISI Guides to the Major Disciplines are reader-friendly introductions to the most important fields of knowledge in the liberal arts. Written by leading scholars for both students and the general public, they will be appreciated by anyone desiring a reliable and informative tour of important subject matter. Each title offers an historical overview of a particular discipline, explains the central ideas of each subject, and evaluates the works of thinkers whose ideas have shaped our world. They will aid students seeking to make better decisions about their course of study as well as general readers who wish to supplement their education. All who treasure the world of ideas and liberal learning will be motivated by these original and stimulating presentations.

uspeh
If you don't read a book ever, these 50 pages should ignite the spark!

Liberal: Liberas: Freedom.
MrCat
Sent a copy to my son. This little book should be required reading for any high schooler - in fact, for anyone who wants to actually think.
Adrierdin
My son received this book as a gift when he was accepted at Georgetown University. I read it, and found it to be quite a "gem". Have purchased several to give as gifts to graduating HS seniors.
Adoranin
This thin text intends to be casual, easy on the attention span, providing options to our university's failures where "diversity" has replaced education as their central function. Those options are valid books (in several very limited lists) censored by our "new-movements" dominating the humanities. And the humanities are most in peril as concrete results of science (technologies) are harder to marginalize - though that effort too is underway.

Schall does not launch a Philippic, never indicates the source of this decay (a motivation for readers in itself) and falls short of full-blown inspiration for learning. As a Jesuit he has more than ample horsepower to do so but, apparently, intends to merely raise awareness, not incite. Too bad.

There are gems, "... humility is misplaced; thought to be located in the intellect where it does not belong... We should not doubt our minds but our motives. The condition of not knowing should not lead us to a further skepticism but to a more intense search for truth." And humor, as Schall pondered a subtitle, "How To Get An Education Even While Still In College".

As important as Schall's tip on postmodern agendas is his caution about machinery of economic society where nature and the human spirit are eviscerated by product, profit and utility (though again, its passive). "The important things, Aristotle told us, are to be known `for their own sakes'". A pleasant book, probably well suited for students strongly influenced by blood-chemistry, pop-media and about to get four-years of sensitivity training. With Schall's help perhaps they'll graduate with something worth knowing and a route toward understanding through pursuit of real learning after the degree.
LivingCross
good purchase
Cordabor
The book "How to Read a Book" is often mentioned here in this short book by James V. Schall, as it deals with some of the same issues, issues about discovering things, and 'the truth', for oneself, by the help of good or great books.

Schall has clear thoughts on how he wants the reader to understand him, and he delivers three major points in the book:

1) Colleges do not teach us the whole thing; the student must use self-learning.
2) Build a personal library of great books (The Bible and the Complete Works of Shakespeare are mentioned).
3) Reading a book only once is not enough.

These points, and the book recommendations given in the book, is probably the essence of "A Student's Guide to Liberal Learning". Those aside, there are some interesting tips and anecdotes, but also the ideas of 'liberal' (or 'free') learning.

This type of learning is expressed by Schall as 'How to Get an Education While Still in College'. So, if you are a college student wanting to learn by yourself while still in college, this book can be a useful guide.

"A Student's Guide to Liberal Learning" is not a book I would have bought if it wasn't recommended; it was recommended because I have bought "How to Read a Book". I recommend that book to anyone who wishes to become a better reader - and this book to anyone who wants to learn while still getting an education.
Silly Dog
James Schall, professor in the Department of Government at Georgetown University, wrote this book as part of the ISI Guides to the Major Disciplines. The primary emphasis of Shall's book is to encourage the student to think, even saying that "thinking is itself...an adventure." He encourages students to read great books saying that "the very existence of the great books enables us to escape from any tyranny of the present, from the idea that we only want to study what is currently `relevant' or immediately useful." Amen!

How can a student accomplish this life-long journey of learning - Schall gives two simple steps: 1) self-discipline and 2) a personal library. Schall encourages college students to practice self-discipline, mastery over their passions to the end that they might be free to pursue those things of meaning and purpose in life. Of course, if a student is able to control his sensual appetite, he can then dine on the delicacies of the great works of literature - Schall encourages students to begin to build their own personal library of great books that they can read and re-read and use in a variety of ways once they have been digested fully by the reader.

Schall is good about giving numerous lists of books that he considers worthy of our time and energy to read. He also notes in the book that everyone has the time to read and reflect, but few actually use it...he encourages the reader to make use of those odd or spare moments and hours in a week to read and reflect. The book is good, but since Schall is coming from a Catholic background, many of the books that he suggests wouldn't be on my Top Ten list...although many would!